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Illustration of Mohamed Noor in space wearing a Star Trek style uniform
Resistance (to science) is futile

Mohamed Noor ’92 brings the science to science fiction as a consultant for “Star Trek: Discovery”

A person in a bee keeper's suit stands near a hive
W&M announces spring, summer 2021 Green Fee awards

With the promotion of sustainable practices at the forefront of these grants, the Committee on Sustainability members approved a total of $35,712 to be spent across a broad spectrum or projects, from academia and research, to operations that advance sustainability on campus.

Center for Conservation Biology’s Libby Mojica cradles a golden eagle
In ‘Science:’ CCB’s bird-tracking data added to Arctic Animal Movement Archive

Bryan Watts, the director of William & Mary’s Center for Conservation Biology, and Fletcher Smith, a research associate at the CCB, are part of an effort to share animal-tracking data to get a handle on what is ahead for the diverse animal populations of the changing Arctic and near-Arctic habitats.

red-cockaded woodpecker
Once in imminent danger, rare woodpecker reaches milestone in its recovery

The Piney Grove Preserve has shifted from receiving red-cockaded woodpeckers from other populations to donating woodpeckers. The movement marks a milestone in the recovery of the species and is a testament to the valuable work of W&M’s Center for Conservation Biology.

James Skelton with red drum
Meet Dr. James Skelton

Newly hired Assistant Professor James Skelton's research subjects often involve the quirky organisms people usually don’t notice or even realize exist. Read on to find out what a Quantitative Symbiologist does.

Dr. Lisa A. Jackson
W&M alumna helps lead COVID-19 vaccine study

Dr. Lisa A. Jackson ’84 has conducted numerous vaccine studies, but the task before her in March was different — the timing compressed, the stakes higher — when her team launched one of the first human clinical trials for a vaccine to block infection from the virus that causes COVID-19.

Student reading on a bench on the Lake Matoaka pier
W&M's Parks Research Lab releases Campus Greenspace Map

For the past seven years, Dorothy Ibes has been using William & Mary’s outdoor space as a laboratory to understand the relationship between human health and human access to nature. 

Erica Smith head shot
Staying vigilant against the virus

Epidemiologist Erica E. Smith ’08 helps coordinate Delaware’s response to COVID-19

Heather Kenny places a band on a bluebird
In a quiet world, research on noise and nesting bluebirds

Heather Kenny, a biology master’s student at William & Mary, has spent the past two years studying the parenting behavior of bluebirds. Specifically, she is working to understand how human-made noise influences nesting and productivity.

EdoReps students carrying items on freshman move-in day
W&M announces 2020 spring Green Fee projects

The William & Mary Committee on Sustainability has announced the spring 2020 Green Fee awards, which will be awarded to seven campus projects.

The USNS Comfort
W&M alumnus on a mission of Comfort

Having completed a month-long mission of helping New York City hospitals that were overwhelmed by the coronavirus pandemic, the USNS Comfort has sailed back to Virginia with about 600 doctors, nurses and other crew members, including Dr. A. Scott Morris ’10, a lieutenant in the Navy’s Medical Corps and an alumnus of William & Mary.

A great blue heron stands near a pond
Social distancing in birds

One of many things that the COVID-19 pandemic will be remembered for is the introduction of the term “social distancing” to the global lexicon. For bird behaviorists, the term and its variants have been in use for over a century.

Cellular image of circles and swirls
Immune-system cells of fish are ingesting plastic…and then dying

The research lab of Patty Zwollo, an immunologist and professor of biology at William & Mary, has discovered that just as whales swallow plastic thinking it’s food, some cellular components of the immune system in fish “swallow” bits of microplastic that they mistake for invading pathogens.

A series of planting pots containing Mars-like soil
How scientifically accurate is 'The Martian'? Ask W&M’s budding astrobotanists

Jon Kay, a visiting assistant professor of geology at William & Mary, is using the hypothetical situation Matt Damon’s character finds himself in — being stranded on Mars and forced to grow his own food — as a real research question for students in his new COLL 150 class Science and Science Fiction.

A MERS coronavirus shows its namesake crown-like structure under the microscope.
A coronavirus Q&A with a virologist

Kurt Williamson is a virologist, an associate professor in William & Mary’s Department of Biology who specializes in the study of viruses. He offers some scientific context for the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak.

Molly Mitchell
VIMS scientist wins national Early Career Leadership Award

Molly Mitchell of William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science has earned an Early Career Leadership Award from the US CLIVAR Program for her efforts to develop and share sea-level forecasts and other planning tools with coastal risk managers and emergency responders in Virginia and the mid-Atlantic region.

A student spoons soil samples taken around campus
William & Mary’s freshman phage lab goes viral for the 12th straight year

A new lab of select William & Mary freshmen takes on the study of bacteriophages each fall. It’s a program supported by the Science Education Alliance of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute called the Phage Hunters Advancing Genomic and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) project.

Headshot of Lizabeth Allison, Chancellor Professor of Biology at William & Mary
Allison wins Ruth Kirschstein Diversity in Science Award

Lizabeth Allison, Chancellor Professor of Biology at William & Mary, has been awarded the Ruth Kirschstein Diversity in Science Award by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

Gail smiles at the camera from an archaeological dig site
Gail Williams Wertz ’66, M.A. ’19 digs into new career

Gail is currently a full-time graduate student in anthropology and archaeology at William & Mary, returning to her alma mater after an almost 50-year career in biomedical research.

A photo from June of 2018 shows the Newton Trees growing outside Small Hall doing well, even producing apples.
Sad news: The Newton Trees are gone

William & Mary’s Isaac Newton apple trees no longer stand outside Small Hall. The trees likely succumbed to a bacterial disease known as fire blight.

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Plumeri Awards honor excellence

On Friday, May 3, the university honored the 2019 recipients for their outstanding achievements in teaching, research and service to the William & Mary community.

Grace Solini and Hana Warner
Two W&M juniors awarded Goldwater Scholarship

William & Mary’s legacy of success with the Goldwater Scholarship Program continues in 2019 as two students have been named to the exclusive list of undergraduate scholars. Hana Warner ’20 and Grace Solini ‘20 are among just 496 undergraduate students nationwide to be named Goldwater Scholars in 2019.

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W&M's annual Raft Debate set for March 14

The 2019 Raft Debate, a much beloved William & Mary tradition, will be held at the Sadler Center in Chesapeake ABC, on March 14 at 6:30 p.m.

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GMOs not main culprit in monarch butterfly decline

Jack Boyle, a post-doctorate Mellon Fellow at W&M, is lead author on a paper that shows GMOs are not the main culprit for the decline of the monarch butterfly, a finding that goes against claims made by scientists and activists for decades.

Spider silk square
Unraveling another secret of spider silk — it’s a cable!

A strand of spider silk is five times stronger than a steel cable of the same weight, said Hannes Schniepp of the Department of Applied Science at William & Mary. His lab has been unraveling the secrets behind the strength of the brown recluse spider.

igem 2018 square
W&M iGEM team decodes the signals of cells

The William & Mary iGEM team is preparing to compete in the world’s largest synthetic biology competition for the fifth year in a row. The students have spent the past six months finding a multidisciplinary approach to cracking the code for how cells interpret signals.