William & Mary

Department Hosts First Archaeology Day

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Prof. Andrew Ward discusses his excavation with studentsUPDATE: see also this story about the event

On Saturday September 21, the Classical Studies department hosted W&M's first Archaeology Day. The event included a poster session, a guided tour of the department's collection of archaeological artifacts, a book sale, a screening of the film Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (followed by student-led discussion), and refreshments arranged by our indefatigable departmental administrator Joyce Holmes. All sessions were very well attended and well received at the first of what we hope will be an annual event.

At the poster session, 14 students and faculty from Classical Studies and a number of other departments, including Anthropology, Chemistry, and Geology, presented the results of their archaeological research (see the list below). Dr. Laurie Rush, Cultural Resources Manager at Fort Drum, delivered a keynote address for the occasion on the previous evening, and generously took the time to talk with the presenters about their research.

Dr. Laurie Rush chats with students at Archaeology DayProfessors Georgia Irby, Jessica Paga, Andrew Ward, and Mitch Brown took the lead in organizing the event for the department, and support was generously provided by the Center for Liberal Arts, the Arts & Sciences Annual Fund, and an Archaeological Institute of America local society outreach grant via the Williamsburg chapter of the AIA.

Poster-session participants:

  • Kayla Cahoon, Nicholas Balascio, James Kaste, Maddie Renshaw (VIMS) - SCPs, Trace Metals, and Lake Matoaka
  • Elizabeth Dowker (Art History) - Sanctuary of the Great Gods, Samothrace, Greece: Space K
  • Jennifer Ellis, Chardé Reid, Rebekah Planto, and Erin Schwartz (Anthropology) - Windows to the Past: How Anthropology Informs Archaeology
  • Daniel Highland, Kristin Wustholz (Chemistry) - Identifying Fugitive Pigments in Cultural Heritage Objects using SERS
  • Georgia Irby (Classical Studies) - The Ancients Speak: Archaeology and the "Written Word"
  • Brighten Meade (Classical Studies) - Villa Del Vergigno Archaeological Project
  • Christina Monroe (Classical Studies) - Extracting Divine Favor by Interring the Dead: The Placement of Etruscan Necropoleis and Their Role within Sacred Landscapes
  • Madeleine Nelson (Classical Studies) - Over the Hill and Through the Woods: Navigating the Sanctuary of the Great Gods at Samothrace
  • Andy Oudkirk (Religious Studies) - Excavations Megiddo and Kiriath Jearim, Bronze and Iron Age Excavations in Israel
  • Iris Puryear (Classical Studies) - Taberna Lusoria: Contextualizing Pompeian Tabernae
  • Carson Sisk (Classical Studies): Public Archaeology in the UK and US
  • Bronwynn Terrell, Jennifer Kahn, Shannon White (Anthropology and Center for GIS) - GIS Mapping, Sacred Trees, and Archaeology Sites of the 'Opunohu Valley, Mo'orea (French Polynesia)
  • George Tomadakis (Classical Studies) - Argilos Trench L3
  • Andrew Farinholt Ward (Classical Studies) - American Excavations at Selinunte, Sicily
  • Reese Waters (Classical Studies) - Underwater Archaeology in Menorca, Spain