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Science & Technology

Bryan Watts uses a caliber to take several measurements of an eaglet as Bart Paxton helps to steady the bird.
Leaving the nest

Shane Lawler was taking care of business in a loblolly pine, 90 feet above Gospel Spreading Farm, unfazed by the agitated bald eagles spiraling around his head. "All right!" he yelled to Bryan Watts, waiting at the base of the tree. "I've got one bird in a bag."

goldfish
Inspired by fish

What if we could design industrial filters that just don’t clog? William & Mary ichthyologist Laurie Sanderson has a patent pending on a new type of filter that is designed to be clogless, or at least clog-resistant.

ScaAnalyzer
ScaAnalyzer

Computer developers work like runners in a race. One foot — software — has to keep pace with the advancement of the other foot — hardware. (And vice versa, of course).

An image from the SXS Project depicts the collision of two black holes
Black holes collide

William & Mary’s physics community squeezed into a single room the morning of Feb. 11 to hear the announcement, a group of just-from-class undergraduates finding room on the floor and in odd corners.

Sara Schad ’16, Cyril Anyetei-Anum ’16, Chancellor Professor of Biology Lizabeth Allison and M.S. student Dylan Zhang
Downtown Cell City?

Think of a cell as a city, a metropolis both constructed of and populated by proteins.

Haitao Xu reports for work on the Alibaba corporate campus in Hangzhou, China.
A digital detective

Online ratings and reviews are a helpful, if imperfect, guide for potential customers.

Faraz Rahman (left) and Jasmin Green, known collectively as “Jafar” look over the open water of Lake Matoaka with Kurt.
Going viral

Lake Matoaka has a thriving and diverse population of viruses living in its waters. And that’s good.

Larry Leemis
Big love for big data

If there is a fire hydrant in front of your home, premiums on your homeowner’s insurance will be lower than the same home without a fire hydrant in its proximity.

Comfort food

Psychologists have traditionally looked to the mind to help people living with mental health issues. But a recent study led by William & Mary researchers shows that the stomach may also play a key role.

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