William & Mary

Konstantinos Orginos awarded time on world’s fastest supercomputer to study Lattice QCD

  • Portrait photograph of Konstantinos Orginos, associate professor in the William & Mary Department of Physics
    Supercomputing:  Konstantinos Orginos, a professor in the William & Mary Department of Physics, received 238,000 node hours on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility’s Summit supercomputer for “Hadron Structure from Lattice QCD.”  Photo by Stephen Salpukas
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A William & Mary physicist has been awarded computing time on a U.S. Department of Energy machine that holds current bragging rights of world’s fastest supercomputer.

Konstantinos Orginos, a professor in the William & Mary Department of Physics, received 238,000 node hours on the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility’s Summit supercomputer for “Hadron Structure from Lattice QCD.”

A press release from the DOE’s Oak Ridge National Lab lists Orginos among the 21 researchers and teams that received a combined 6 million node hours on Summit, a 200-petaflop IBM AC922 system. Computing time is allocated through the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research’s Leadership Computing Challenge.

This year, 21 research teams have been awarded a combined 6 million node hours on the OLCF’s Summit supercomputer, a 200-petaflop IBM AC922 system.

The program grants the one-year allotments to scientists from industry, academia and national laboratories whose work emphasizes high-risk, high-payoff simulations in energy-related fields. The program allocates up to 30 percent of the ASCR computational resources at the Oak Ridge faility, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

The research performed on Summit will range from simulations of engine performance by General Motors to the study of compressed carbon materials by the University of South Florida.