William & Mary

Campus health notice

Vice President for Student Affairs Ginger Ambler and Director of the Student Health Center Virginia Wells sent the following messages to the campus community. - Ed.

April 26, 2018

Dear W&M Community,

Earlier this week we informed you that the Peninsula Health District had identified a case of mumps at William & Mary. We have now learned that additional cases have been confirmed. As with the first, these additional students have been isolated and those known to have had contact with them have been notified.

Please review your immunization status and contact your doctor to receive vaccine as needed.  MMR is usually given at age 12 months and again between the ages of 4 to 6 years.  The mumps vaccine is 88% effective in persons having received two doses; therefore, some fully immunized individuals may still develop mumps. 

Mumps is an acute viral disease that is transmitted from person to person through direct contact with respiratory droplets spread by coughing and sneezing, or through contact with saliva from an ill person, such as by sharing drinking cups, cigarettes, e-cigarettes or eating utensils.  Persons with mumps may have body aches, fever, and swollen glands in the jaw.  Most people recover from the illness in a week, but serious complications are possible.

We want to remind you that people who are exposed to mumps may not show symptoms for 12 to 25 days.  Typically, infected individuals can transmit the infection to others two days before symptoms appear.  If you develop mumps-like symptoms, first contact your doctor and self-isolate until your doctor directs otherwise (self-isolate means: no class, no work, no gym, no parties, no eating out, and no team practices).  If you have questions about whether you are up-to-date with your mumps immunizations, please contact your physician.  

The university has taken all appropriate and recommended steps, including sharing this information with the campus community.  We will continue to provide additional updates or recommendations if needed.  More information about mumps is available in the attached flyers and from Virginia Department of Health at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/mumps/

Sincerely,

Virginia D. Wells, M.D.
Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases
Director, Student Health Center

Virginia M. Ambler, Ph.D.
Vice President for Student Affairs

 

April 24, 2018

Dear W&M Community,

The Peninsula Health District has identified a case of mumps at William & Mary. The student has been isolated and those known to have had contact with the student have been notified. Still, due to the close environments of campus settings, the health department has determined it is possible some students may have been exposed to mumps.  We are encouraging you, therefore, to review your immunization status and contact your doctor to receive vaccine as needed.  MMR is usually given at age 12 months and again between the ages of 4 to 6 years.  The mumps vaccine is 88% effective in persons having received two doses; therefore, some fully immunized individuals may still develop mumps. 

Mumps is an acute viral disease that is transmitted from person to person through direct contact with respiratory droplets spread by coughing and sneezing, or through contact with saliva from an ill person, such as by sharing drinking cups, cigarettes, e-cigarettes or eating utensils.  Persons with mumps may have body aches, fever, and swollen glands in the jaw.  Most people recover from the illness in a week, but serious complications are possible.

People who are exposed to mumps may not show symptoms for 12 to 25 days. Typically, infected individuals can transmit the infection to others two days before symptoms appear.  If you develop mumps-like symptoms, first contact your doctor and self-isolate until your doctor directs otherwise (self-isolate means: no class, no work, no gym, no parties, no eating out, and no team practices).  If you have questions about whether you are up-to-date with your mumps immunizations, please contact your physician.  

The university has taken all appropriate and recommended steps, including sharing this information with the campus community.  We will provide additional updates or recommendations if needed.

More information about mumps is available in the attached flyers and from Virginia Department of Health at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/mumps/

Sincerely,

Virginia D. Wells, M.D.
Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases
Director, Student Health Center

Virginia M. Ambler, Ph.D.
Vice President for Student Affairs