Fall 2016

September 2, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: Department Panel
Host: Physics Chair Gene Tracy
Abstract: Panel Discussion about department followed by 1st social event of the year. PGSA/SPS/Dept join

September 9, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: Jason McDevitt, William & Mary
Title: Commercialization of Technology Developed at W&M
Abstract: I will discuss patents and commercialization of inventions, both on a general level and more specific to W&M.  Additionally,  I will talk about startup companies and the logistics of getting a company started and then funded, as well as the relative advantages and disadvantages of trying to spin companies out of W&M.
Jason McDevitt's Presentation (pdf)

September 23, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: Hebin Li, Department of Physics, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
 Host: E. Mikhailov
Title:  Optical Multi-dimensional Coherent Spectroscopy 
Abstract: The concept of multi-dimensional coherent spectroscopy originated in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) where it revolutionized NMR studies of molecular structure and dynamics. In the past two decades, the same concept has been implemented in the optical region with femtosecond lasers. In the experiment, the nonlinear response of a sample to multiple laser pulses is measured as a function of time delays. A multi-dimensional spectrum is constructed by taking a multi-dimensional Fourier transform of the signal with respect to multiple time delays.
In this presentation, I will introduce optical multi-dimensional coherent spectroscopy and its applications to study atomic vapors and semiconductor nanostructures. Atomic vapors provide a simple test model to validate the method, while the obtained 2D spectra reveal the surprising collective resonance due to the dipole-dipole interaction in a dilute gas. By extending the technique into a third dimension, 3D spectra can unravel different pathways in a quantum process and provide complete and unambiguous information to construct the full Hamiltonian of the system. Besides atomic vapors, optical multi-dimensional coherent spectroscopy is also a powerful tool for studying many-body dynamics and coupling in solid-state systems such as semiconductor nanostructures. I will present several applications in semiconductor quantum wells and self-assembled quantum dots, where unique information about the systems can be obtained from 2D spectra. The technique will also have advantages in studying valley carrier dynamics in atomically thin 2D semiconductors.  

September 30, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: TBA
Host: 
Title: 
Abstract: 

October 7, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: Dr. Douglas Higinbotham, Jefferson Lab
Host: T. Averett
Title: The Proton Radius Puzzle
Abstract: Recent atomic physics measurements using the Lamb shift in Muonic hydrogen have determined the proton's charge radius to be 0.84 fm, while the radius determined from atomic hydrogen Lamb shift and modern electron scattering measurements give a value of 0.88 fm. As the proton has only one true radius, this systematic difference in the radius from different measurement techniques has become known as the proton radius puzzle. I will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Muonic hydrogen measurements compared to atomic hydrogen. I will also summarize the history of the electron results, starting from the 1963 review article on nuclear physics electron scattering data by Hand et al. with its 0.81(1)fm 

standard dipole radius, and track the evolution of the proton charge radius up to the recent 0.88(1)fm results from Mainz. I will then discuss the statistical methods that were used by groups in Virginia (JLab, UVA, and W&M) that yield an electron scattering result that is in agreement with the Muonic hydrogen results. Finally, I will discuss  how these results could bring about a change to the Rydberg constant.


October 21, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: TBA
Host: 
Title: 
Abstract: 

October 28, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: TBA
Host: 
Title: 

Abstract: 

November 4, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: TBA
Host: 
Title: 
Abstract: 

November 11, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: TBA
Host: 
Title: 

Abstract:  

November 18, 2016 (Friday) 4:00-5:00p.m. Small Hall 111
Speaker: Kenneth Burch (BC)
Host: I. Novikova
Title: 
Abstract: