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Chardé Reid

Year Entered: 2017
Degree Sought: M.A./Ph.D.
Sub-field: Archaeology
Research Interests: African Diaspora Anthropology and Archaeology; Engaged and Community-Based Archaeology; Critical Heritage Studies; Black Feminist Theory; Critical Race Theory; Historical Memory; Archaeological Ethics
Regional Specialization: North America (Southeast & Mid-Atlantic)

Background

Chardé Reid is a historical archaeology Ph.D. student in William & Mary’s Department of Anthropology. Her doctoral research investigates the relationship between archaeological knowledge production, heritage sites, historical memory, contemporary identities, and restorative justice in Tidewater Virginia. Results of Chardé’s master’s thesis research, which explored the complex relationship between making African Diaspora history and culture visible at Historic Jamestowne, were recently published in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology. Before joining William & Mary’s anthropology graduate program, Chardé served as the Assistant Archaeologist of the District of Columbia for seven years. Her community-engaged and interdisciplinary research has previously been recognized with a Mark E. Mack Community Engagement Award (2016), a District of Columbia Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation for Community Involvement/ Education (2017), and the National Park Service’s Appleman-Judd-Lewis Regional Award for Interdisciplinary Stewardship Team (2020). Currently, she is the co-chair (Community Side) of the William & Mary Student Assembly’s Ad-Hoc Committee on Reparations, and a member and group advisor to the Lemon Project: A Journey of Reconciliation's undergraduate and graduate student volunteer group, the Lemon Project Society. 

 

Publications:

“It’s Not About Us”: Exploring White‐Public Heritage Space,
Community, and Commemoration on Jamestown Island,
Virginia in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology, February 2021

Chardé has also recently published an op-ed in the William & Mary student newspaper, The Flat Hat, on the subject of community and reparations.