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Meet Dr. Chinua Akimaro Thelwell, an Interdisciplinary Scholar on Race and Place

Dr. Chinua Akimaro Thelwell has always found college classrooms to be one of the “few spaces in American society where people could have honest and informed conversations around race and racism.” When entering the higher education space as a professor, Thelwell wanted to incorporate those ideas and conversations into his teaching.

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W&M responds to call for feedback on naming principles

The William & Mary community responded “emphatically and with a great deal of warmth toward our Alma Mater of a Nation” to principles drafted for naming and renaming of buildings, spaces and structures on campus.

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Justice for Native Americans, more than a century later

Legislators in Washington state observed this principle when they passed a law in 2014 enabling Native American defendants tried before 1975 to have their convictions overturned if they were exercising treaty-reserved rights to fish at “usual and accustomed places” off reservation. If those people are now deceased, family members may appeal on their behalf, allowing restorative justice even in cases that date back 100 years.

Books on John Tyler provide look at W&M alum and U.S. president

Only once in United States history have presidential and vice presidential candidates come originally from the same state, much less the same county. Such was the case in 1840, when William Henry Harrison and John Tyler, both born in small Charles City County, ran on the Whig Party ticket and won.

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Pandemics: Hope from history

Gérard Chouin, associate professor of history at William & Mary, discusses COVID-19 in the context of past pandemics.

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Dispatches from the United States

As COVID-19 continues to ravage the world, we hope and pray that you, your family and all loved ones are safe and healthy during these increasingly perilous times. We know too well that all over the world, ongoing racial and economic inequalities explain why COVID-19 kills people of color in highly disproportionate numbers. Black and brown people cannot always take protective social distancing measures while...

Statement on Current Events

"The role of The Lemon Project: A Journey of Reconciliation is to tell the full story, to administer the medicine, and to make it plain for all to see and learn from. Of course, some people will find the medicine difficult to take and it will make them uncomfortable, but that is the price we all must pay if real and lasting change has a hope of surviving."

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COVID, race, and a pivotal moment for America

In some ways, the circumstances of 2020 are not so much a repeat of 1968’s as an extension of them, says Robert Vinson, a professor of history at The College of William & Mary.

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Professor Chouin participates in Webinar on the the latest research into the Black Death

Gerard Chouin recently participated in a Webinar run by the Medieval Academy of America, entitled "The Mother of All Pandemics: The State of Black Death Research in the Era of Covid-19." Gerard shared the virtual stage with other experts in the fields of bioarchaeology, genetics, climate history, literary studies, and art history.

Karin Wulf Interviews Alexis Coe About Her Cheeky New George Washington Biography

No one would describe Alexis Coe’s unconventional biography of conventional biographical subject George Washington as boring. Starting with its cover illustration, a playful Washington grinning at the reader, You Never Forget Your First is a wink of sorts, at Washington biography and at the ways that Americans have very consistently misremembered the first president.

Footage shows alumni present at fall of the Berlin Wall

Last semester, College of William and Mary history professor Frederick Corney and his students discovered a man clad in a green crewneck sweater in a film showing the 1989 collapse of the Berlin Wall.

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Meet this year's Faculty Fellowship awardees

Each year, the Alumni Association honors five professors in the early stages of their careers who exemplify teaching excellence at William & Mary.

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First history of African Americans at W&M published

“Building on the Legacy: African Americans at William & Mary,” an illustrated history, was written by Jacquelyn McLendon, professor of English, emerita, and was released this month.

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Why is impeachment in the Constitution?

With impeachment in the news, W&M News sat down with historian Karin Wulf to discuss the origin of the impeachment process outlined in the U.S. Constitution.

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The 1619 anniversary: Where does the American story begin? | Opinion

Four hundred years ago, in August of 1619, more than 20 African captives arrived by ship to the English colony of Virginia, predating the Mayflower journey that brought English Pilgrims to what is now Massachusetts by a year. As recently explored in the New York Times Magazine’s 1619 Project, this anniversary reignites questions about American history, including: Which stories has it prioritized, and which has it left out?

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Q&A: Robert Trent Vinson on the history, legacies of 1619

W&M News recently talked with Robert Trent Vinson, Frances L. and Edwin L. Cummings Professor of History and Africana Studies, about 1619, its significance and its part in the upcoming ASWAD conference.

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Lemon Project fosters historical discussion, will host campus symposium

As the new academic year begins, the Lemon Project is celebrating its ninth year of working towards discovery and reconciliation for African Americans enslaved by the College of William and Mary in the early days of its history. As it nears the completion of its first decade in operation, the Project continues to build scholarship and awareness of these untold stories through research, open dialogue and community engagement.

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Professor Vinson: City Council Briefing on ASWAD Conference

William & Mary Professor Robert Trent Vinson will brief City Council about the 10th Biennial ASWAD (Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora) Conference coming to William & Mary November 5-9, 2019. Vinson has just been elected President of ASWAD and will talk about the conference, William & Mary's role, and the nearly 1,000 scholars, artists and activists from 30 countries that he's bringing to Williamsburg.

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Kashmir: History and Politics

This lecture will address the complex history and recent developments of the Kashmir dispute in the midst of tense India and Pakistan relations as well as a very diverse Kashmiri people.

1619-2019: From Trauma to Triumph

In late August of 1619, a ship landed in Point Comfort, Virginia with what was recorded as “20 and odd Negars” on board. In the language of the era, the word ‘negar’ meant black, and these men, women and children from West Central Africa had dark skin, burnished by the sun.

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How The Kashmir Region Became A Geopolitical Hot Spot

People in Kashmir are hoping that life starts returning to normal in the next few days. Ever since the Indian government revoked the territory's limited autonomy earlier this month, millions of Kashmiris have been cut off from the outside world, living without internet or phone services. But Kashmir is no stranger to unrest. And to give us some history on how we got to this moment, we're joined now by Chitralekha Zutshi. She's a professor of history at the William & Mary.

NATO was — and still is — absolutely essential

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is the most successful alliance in history. In its 70 years, NATO has brought a historically unprecedented period of great power stability to Europe. NATO’s “attack on one is an attack on all” guarantee, underscored by the presence of American military forces on the continent, assures the security of the democratic West’s territory and political institutions. A strong trans-Atlantic alliance was — and remains — absolutely essential to our defense of American national interests.

Universities Grapple With Historical Ties To Slavery

In the past month, both the University of Bristol and the University of Cambridge in England have announced plans to research their historical links to slavery. But other universities, particularly in the United States, have been doing similar work for years. Among those universities are the College of William & Mary in Virginia and Sewanee: The University of the South in Tennessee.

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The Lemon Project Report

The work of Lemon Project has been challenging and rewarding. It has also been inspiring. It has provided a doorway to the past and a way to propel William & Mary into the future. And we have just begun. Stay tuned.

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W&M professor wins prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

Ronald Schechter, professor of history at William & Mary, has been awarded the 2019 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in Intellectual and Cultural History.

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At the GRS Symposium: When in Boston, stop into Mr. Abbot’s

Alexandra Macdonald has been looking into the 18th-century “theatre of consumption” that was Samuel Abbot’s shop and the retail culture of colonial America, where even the residents of Puritan Boston were interested in consumption.

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Tack Faculty Lecture to explore Marie Antoinette’s secret library

Ronald Schechter, professor of history at William & Mary, will deliver the spring 2019 Tack Faculty Lecture, “The Secret Library of Marie Antoinette: Revealing the Inner Life of a Conflicted Queen,” on March 28 at 7 p.m. at the Sadler Center’s Commonwealth Auditorium.