William & Mary prepares to welcome strong Class of 2016

  • Trying it on for size
    Trying it on for size  During Admitted Students Weekend some 3,000 visitors – including 1,000 prospective students – are expected to be on campus. Admitted students and their families will visit campus and meet and congregate with current students, faculty, staff and administrators.  
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This fall’s entering undergraduate class at William & Mary is poised to be among the best and brightest to arrive at the College.

William & Mary recently sent acceptances to approximately 4,250 students in anticipation of enrolling a freshman class of 1,470 in the fall. The group of admitted students – many of whom will be in Williamsburg this weekend for Saturday’s Day for Admitted Students – represents one of the most academically accomplished and diverse admitted freshmen classes in the College’s 319-year history, said Henry Broaddus, associate provost for enrollment and dean of admission.

The group of admitted students comes from the largest undergraduate applicant pool in the College’s history – William & Mary received more than 13,600 undergraduate applications for the Class of 2016, a record number for the eighth year in a row. The admission office spent the past several months carefully reading each application and shaping this year’s group of admitted students, Broaddus said.

“We are extremely pleased with how next year’s class is shaping up,” said Broaddus, adding that William & Mary’s admitted Class of 2016 saw increases in both the middle 50th percentile of SAT scores and the percentage of students of color.

“These students are incredibly accomplished academically, and they will enrich our campus community with a wide range of talents, interests and backgrounds."

Among the highlights of this year’s group:

  • As a result of the increase in applications, the admit rate for this year’s class was 31.1 percent compared to 34.6 percent a year ago.
  • SAT scores were comparably strong to previous years. The middle 50th percentile for the SAT Critical Reading and Math scores was 1300 to 1510, compared to 1300 to 1490 a year ago.  The median score was 1400, the same as last year.
  • 32.7 percent of the admitted students are students of color. This is an increase from last year’s final total of 31.6 percent.
  • 88.4 percent of admitted students with a high-school rank finished in the top 10 percent of their graduating class – an increase from 86.1 percent a year ago. Broaddus noted that only 38 percent of admitted students attend a high school that reports class rank.

Approximately 3,000 visitors – including 1,000 prospective students – are expected to be in town this weekend. Admitted students and their families will visit campus, take part in activities to introduce them to campus and meet and congregate with current students, faculty, staff and administrators.

“This is a fun time to be on campus,” Broaddus said. “There is so much energy and so much enthusiasm as we welcome the newest members of the Tribe.”