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Arts & Humanities

An 18th-century brewery?

All signs indicate that a brew house once stood in the shadow of the Wren Building, but those inclined to toast the rediscovery of a facility that slaked thirsts at William & Mary 300 years ago should really wait until the lab results are in.

students working at the Bray School dig site
Digging for a smoking lunchbox

Archaeologists have a month to find the smoking lunchbox of the Bray School, and Terry Meyers has lost none of his optimism.

Be there…or be 1/r²

The hyper-rational world of science has always made a bit of room to accommodate legend and William & Mary will soon be home to a living piece of one of the most well known scientific legends: a descendant of Isaac Newton’s apple tree.

Madeline Benjamin
Into the woods…with Thoreau

As a summer counselor at Camp Takodah in the woods of New Hampshire, Benjamin led a group of teenage girls in a non-traditional learning experience that she based off of the theory and thought of perhaps the ultimate camp counselor—Henry David Thoreau.

1977 police record of the capture of Dora Marta Landi
Searching for the ‘disappeared’

A dozen high-level Latin American military officers are on trial in Argentina for their role in Operation Condor, and William & Mary students have been assisting with the prosecution.

Pondering ambiguity

As you walk into William & Mary's Mason School of Business, vanilla-cream tiles catch your eye as the sunlight streams down from the third-story atrium and reflects off the lobby floor.

Student historians (from left) Jack Middough, Sagra Alvarado, Crosby Enright, Tracey Johnson, Jessie Dzura
Spanish court

Domestic violence. Drug smuggling. Priests hauled into court for scandalous behavior. Welcome to Spain in the 17th century.

Barbara King
Animal grief

Animals feel grief; they mourn. And there are enough documented examples of the phenomenon to fill a book.

Timothy Costelloe (left), Adam Potkay (center) and Chandos Brown.
A sublime history

If you were to stand at the edge of the Grand Canyon, or observe the Mona Lisa in real life at the Louvre, you might be lucky enough to experience what Timothy Costelloe calls the Sublime—but only if the experience is literally awesome.

Lu Ann Homza (center) discusses with her students intricate script handwriting of copies of 15th century Spanish manuscripts.
Into the archives...

The writing is cramped, and ink bleeds through the 400-year-old manuscript. There are letters missing or substituted, strange abbreviations and various words that seem to make no sense.