Science & Technology

Rowan Lockwood
‘Big, honkin’ grandma oysters’

Rowan Lockwood is extracting pearls of data from long-dead oysters. She has strung those data pearls together to craft a set of suggestions for the re-oystering of today's Chesapeake Bay.

Alexander Williams ’17 works with psychologist Chris Conway on a study of how people develop fears of things that haven’t harmed them yet.
Vicarious fear learning

Chris Conway recalls a moment in his childhood in which he was chased by a neighbor’s aggressive dog. The experience didn’t scar Conway, but it did leave a lasting impression on someone else — his brother, who saw everything from afar.

Chemist Robert Orwoll (left) raps his knuckles on a sample regolith-polymer brick
Bricks on Mars

Moses and Aaron, the Old Testament tells us, had to make bricks without straw before their people could leave Egypt and begin the journey to the Promised Land. Bob and Dick have to figure out how to make bricks from regolith before their people can leave Earth and begin colonizing Mars.

Ornithologist Dan Cristol
A surge of neurotoxin is no help

Migration is hard on a songbird. It has a commute of thousands of miles — north or south, depending on the season — a journey that often includes a nonstop flight over the Gulf of Mexico or even along nearly the entire coastline of North and South America.

Bryan Watts uses a caliber to take several measurements of an eaglet as Bart Paxton helps to steady the bird.
Leaving the nest

Shane Lawler was taking care of business in a loblolly pine, 90 feet above Gospel Spreading Farm, unfazed by the agitated bald eagles spiraling around his head. "All right!" he yelled to Bryan Watts, waiting at the base of the tree. "I've got one bird in a bag."

goldfish
Inspired by fish

What if we could design industrial filters that just don’t clog? William & Mary ichthyologist Laurie Sanderson has a patent pending on a new type of filter that is designed to be clogless, or at least clog-resistant.

ScaAnalyzer
ScaAnalyzer

Computer developers work like runners in a race. One foot — software — has to keep pace with the advancement of the other foot — hardware. (And vice versa, of course).

An image from the SXS Project depicts the collision of two black holes
Black holes collide

William & Mary’s physics community squeezed into a single room the morning of Feb. 11 to hear the announcement, a group of just-from-class undergraduates finding room on the floor and in odd corners.

Sara Schad ’16, Cyril Anyetei-Anum ’16, Chancellor Professor of Biology Lizabeth Allison and M.S. student Dylan Zhang
Downtown Cell City?

Think of a cell as a city, a metropolis both constructed of and populated by proteins.

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