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Science & Technology

Sonic Nets

Scarecrows have never worked, and history shows that advancements in technology haven’t worked much better when it comes to shooing birds away from ripening crops.

Gunter Lüpke (left) and Wei Zhang
It’s a small world

The surface of a metal seems smooth, but a closer look—much closer, at the atomic level—will show that the same surface resembles the surface of a beehive.

Le Mangeur de Bleuets

Over the songs of Swainson’s thrush and white-throated sparrows come the soothing calls of approaching whimbrels. Soon 24 birds in formation appear over the tree line and begin a wide circle over the blueberry field.

Rebooting algae

William & Mary scientists are rebooting their algae biofuel initiative, aiming to build on opportunities brought about by new processes, new funding and newly patented apparatus.

Apps in the Cloud

Mike Panciera had already helped a blind man navigate the perilous fantasy worlds of video games. It made sense that the next step would be to design a mobile app to help the blind find their way through the interiors of real buildings.

The missing birds

Mercury takes a toll on the population of songbirds, even at sublethal doses.

Ubiquitous, yet elusive

Neutrinos are interesting to physicists for some of the same reasons that pottery shards are interesting to archaeologists.

At TribeHacks

H. Wade Minter, the chief technology officer at a company that provides web and mobile services to five million users, stood in Swem Library, looked out upon the frantic final minutes of William & Mary’s first 24-hour hackathon and talked about the influence of the liberal arts on computer science.

Center for Conservation Biology scientists use a variety of  indicators, including size and markings, to determine the age of eagle nestling. This chick is eight weeks old.
More eagles, more questions

The Center for Conservation Biology has begun its 2014 flights to survey nesting bald eagles and Mitchell Byrd is once again in the co-pilot seat.