W&M Neurodiversity in the News

Memoirist speaks on autism

John Elder Robison, a best selling memoirist and autism activist, says in order to give children with autism a fair shot at a decent education, schools must first change their approach to dealing with autistic students.

The next frontier in workplace diversity: brain differences

We are on the cusp of a civil rights movement for workers on the autism spectrum and those who have conditions like ADHD and dyslexia. Companies and managers at many companies have already begun to take note.

Four projects receive Creative Adaptation funding

Four projects designed to improve the quality, scope and/or efficiency of programs at William & Mary were made possible this semester with support from the provost's Creative Adaptation Fund.

Creating inclusive classrooms for students with autism

Since 2012, the Neurodiversity Working Group has been working to explore and celebrate the neurological differences in the College's population. Last year, a University Teaching Project grew out of the group, with the aim to focus on the classroom experience for students.

New York Times Best-selling Author Visits William & Mary

While visiting the College, Mr. John Elder Robison met with the Neurodiveristy Working Group, had lunch with students interested in neurodiversity issues, spoke with PSYCH 101 students in Professor Connie Pilkington’s class, and ended the day with a standing-room only presentation.

Neurodiversity: Exploring, supporting a different way of thinking

Karin Wulf describes her 11-year-old son Ethan as an “amazing person” with knowledge and abilities beyond her own. He has a specialist’s knowledge of prehistoric mammals and passion for time travel. And when they watch movies together, he notices things that no one else does.