DC Summer Session 2017

Course List & Descriptions

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NUMBER

ATTRIBUTE

PROFESSOR

SESSION

LOCATION

MEETING TIME

Insurgency and Terrorism

GOVT 391,

3 credits

PPEL 

Professor Kay Floyd

Session 1

W&M Washington Center

Mon-Thur

9:00-10:50AM

This course examines the complexities of insurgency and terrorism in the modern world, while shedding light on the rising problem of religious radicalization and politically motivated violence.

Intro to Creative Writing

CRWR 212,
3 credits

GER 6; ACTV

Professor Brian Castleberry

Session 1

W&M Washington Center

Mon-Thur

5-6:50PM

7-8:50PM

Intro to Creative Writing introduces students to the techniques used by writers in multiple genres of literary activity, including poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama. Through readings and discussion, students will learn the basics of these genres before working on independent narrative projects to be workshopped and discussed in class.

Intro to Islam

REL 212, 3 credits

GER 4B, COLL 200

Professor Chrystie Swiney

Session 1

W&M Washington Center

Tue-Thur

7-9:30PM

This course will be an exploration into the heart of Islam: its origins, historical evolution, diversity, core theological principles, and key modern developments.  During our whirlwind tour, we will touch on many of the currently prevailing stereotypes and misconceptions surrounding the Islamic faith today, questioning, assessing, and in some cases debunking, their veracity.

Nutrition and the Brain

KINE 352,

3 credits

GER 2B, GER 3, COLL 200 NQR, NSCI Behavioral Elective, KINE, NSCI WR

Professor Ken Kambis

Session 1

W&M Washington Center

Mon-Thur

5-6:50PM

This course exposes students to one of the most important elements of health and the effect of what one eats and drinks on health, growth, and maintenance. The initial part of the course emphasizes that, in most strata of our society, we can control what we eat, when we eat it, and how much we eat or drink. Through exploration of past and current research in the area of nutrition science, students will be exposed to the development of the body of literature exploring the effects of various nutrients found in food and how these nutrients affect the brain and subsequent behavior.

Islamophobia, Race, and the City

AMES 320,
3 credits

GER Pending;
COLL 200

Professor Stephen Sheehi

Session 1

W&M Washington Center

Mon-Thur

9:00-10:50AM

This course examines Islamophobia in the United States as a social and political racist phenomenon against Muslims in North America and the world. While we will read major works examining the rise and facets of Islamophobia, this class will take particular advantage of our time in Washington DC. That is, in addition to course work and traditional readings, we will also actively engage community groups, government officials, and activists who have been effected by Islamophobia. We will explore also their ways of "fighting" back. Ideally, I would also like to arrange visits and visitors from a number of different DC mosques. This includes active engagement with not only mainstream mosques largely populated by immigrant Muslims from the Middle East and South Asia but also with historic black mosques. In doing so, we will explore the intersectionality between race, class, ethnicity, and Islamophobia. Please find a dated syllabus from a previous version (but far different version) of this course.

Science of Nutrition

KINE 350,

3 credits

COLL 200 NQR; GER 2B

Professor Ken Kambis

Session 1

W&M Washington Center

Monday

7-8:50PM

This introductory science of nutrition course, which carries GER2B and COLL 200 NQR attributes, will range from discussion of methods of scientific inquiry used to determine needs for individual nutrients through in-depth treatment of life-cycle nutrition issues. Beginning with review of development of theories and how they are tested, basic biochemistry and physiology are discussed. The anatomy of the gastrointestinal system is introduced along with a history of experiments that resulted in our present level of understanding of the physiology of nutrition. The course will deal with assessment of nutritional status and how we know that nutrition is essential to health. Large nutrients necessary for energy production and raw materials as well as vitamins and minerals are reviewed from a biochemical transformation and interaction perspective. Eating disorders, weight loss and gain, body composition changes, and factors that influence food consumption are discussed. Changes in the food supply relative to food processing, additives, naturally occurring toxicants, and microorganisms in food are covered. Nutrition throughout life: The unique needs of older adults, exercising individuals, pregnant and lactating women, infants, adolescents, and nutrition for special populations are also discussed. Consumer concerns about foods and water are addressed throughout the course.

Public Speaking

SPCH 201,

3 credits

GER 6; ALV Professor Barbara Bodde Bauer Session 1 W&M Washington Center

Mon-Thur

3-4:50PM

Students study the theory and practice of public speaking. Students will increase and deepen their oral communication skills through preparation and delivery of formal speeches and speaking exercises. Work will involve selecting, researching, organizing, outlining, wording, and effectively delivering different types of speeches. The course will help students to gain confidence, poise, skill, and clarity with public speaking. The work will help speakers develop their creativity and imagination with communication skills, while developing and enhancing voice and language skills.
Data Driven Journalism: How to Use Information and Stroytelling in International Affairs

INRL 390,

3 credits

Professor Alexander Wooley Session 2 W&M Washington Center Mon-Thur
3-4:50PM
Using data and science to inform policymakers, the media and non-technical audiences. Policymakers and the media are crying out for data and evidence, yet few possess the technical skills or background to make sense of the raw material of science. Knowledgeable intermediaries, scientific translators, are needed. With a focus on international development and international relations, this course will provide students with both theoretical and practical information and story-telling tools to shape sometimes complex subject matter for maximum impact with key DC influencers, in government, international organizations and the media. The course will include a focus on data journalism, especially as it can be applied to international affairs. Worldwide, there is a global transparency trend underway, and AidData at W&M is among the vanguard of this movement. But as more and larger sources of data become available, journalists and communicators need to be able to integrate and synthesize information that enables politicians, policymakers and citizens to understand underlying causes and make better decisions. Unfortunately there is a skills shortage among much of the media, as well as communicators at data-driven organizations, in areas like data sourcing and access, statistical and quantitative analysis, and visualization. This course will touch on many of these issues and, through guest lectures and interactive assignments, develop tools and stories that resonate. The instructor is Alex Wooley, Partnerships and Communications Director at AidData at W&M, a communicator, journalist and international development practitioner for 25+ years, including 8+ years working in DC, who will also leverage for this course his network of policy, science, media and communication contacts.