News

Geology major Kat Turk ’16 and William & Mary paleontologist Rowan Lockwood
Un-beached whale

Cornwallis sank as he died, making a couple of revolutions on his way down, finally ending belly up and flippers akimbo, making a sort of “whale angel” on the ocean bottom.

Learning to tell the stories of science at William & Mary

Dorothy Ibes, the newest Mellon environmental postdoctoral scholar, will teach a spring semester class in science communications, an experience that she hopes will bring some of those stories to light.

Lionfish: It’s what should be for dinner

When Erin Spencer, an ecology major and marine science minor, began to brainstorm ideas for a senior honors thesis, she knew immediately that she wanted to study lionfish.

Emergency siren makes it a bad day for turtle trapping

A wetland ecosystems class caught turtles on Sept. 4 as part of part of a larger initiative. The Ecological Research as Education Network includes turtle censuses from 25 other schools in the United States.

The Bay Game: A simulation of the Chesapeake's health

Students in William & Mary’s Watershed Dynamics class convened in the basement of Tyler and assumed the virtual roles of stakeholders —land developers, farmers, watermen, and local regulators—to simulate the challenges inherent in Chesapeake Bay management.

Therkelsen Takes up Environmental Postdoc

In 2010 Jes Therkelsen begins a two-year residency on campus, teaching and experimenting with how scientists can use visual communication to better publicize their work.

Matching Grant for Environmental Program

Our most recent grant supporting the Environmental Science program comes with a matching requirement. We're seeking $1.6 million in private funding earmarked for the new postdoctoral program.

In praise of post-docs

William & Mary's interdisciplinary environmental program is expanding, thanks to a new post-doctoral fellowship program.

It's Better to Be There

From its base in the power center of Washington, D.C., the Global Environmental Governance Project engages the tough problems surrounding international environmental institutions and laws.

ChAP: Biofuel from aquatic algae

A number of researchers converge on a way to take algae and make it into fuel on an industrial scale.

Solving the Runoff and Development Mystery

An occasional leech comes with the territory when you're studying leaching and other aspects of stormwater retention, as does the occasional incident of equipment tampering.

The World Is My Laboratory

Political borders always struck me as artificial divisions given the interconnectedness of our global environment.

Quicksilver

From 1929-1950 liquid mercury leaked into the South River as it meandered through an industrial section of Waynesboro, near Charlottesville, Virginia.

Little Kenya, Big World: A Journey Through the Small and Big Environmental Institutions

You know you have reached Tumo Tumo, a small agricultural town in the foothills of Mt. Kenya, when the crude paved road turns into a sticky clay path and the van driving you to your destination slows to a crawl in an attempt not to veer off the steep winding road to the valley below.

An Alumna Gives Back

My motivation to attend William & Mary can be summed up in an image: a short, balding man with a dry sense of humor and a passion for all things feathered - Dr. Mitchell Byrd. His mentorship became one of the many benefits garnered in my four years at W&M.

What the Little Birds Tell Us

Nothing is as charismatic as a bluebird, that nearly universal symbol of happiness and well being.