William & Mary

Student-Faculty Research

Members of the William & Mary team celebrate their win on the stage of the iGEM Grand Jamboree.
Natural masters of synthetic biology

An interdisciplinary team of William & Mary students have brought home one of the biggest prizes in synthetic biology, an honor that has been called the World Cup of Science.

The red region is an area of ionized hydrogen where stars are forming and the blue region is a cloud of dust particles that reflect the light from nearby stars.
Horror. Beauty. Science.

Jacob Gunnarson’s first reaction upon being handed the keys to the observatory was one of moderate horror.

A tight bond

Alkaloids are members of a vast family of molecules that are chemically organic and also occur in nature. All forms of life have evolved ways to produce these useful chemicals.

Martin Gallivan (in cap) discusses how to best excavate a hearth feature with (from left) Madeline Gunter, Jessica Bittner and Megan Willmes ’16 as Jak Scrivener ’ 16 takes field notes.
Understanding Kiskiack

Madeline Gunter and Jessica Bittner were using tablespoons to work around some rocks that were just beginning to peek through the troweled-flat, muddy-looking surface of their working unit. They weren't just random stones.

Evidence of how plate tectonics played out in central Virginia is written in the rocks.
Cry of the Banshee

Large swatches of North American maps might as well be labeled “Terra Incognita” or even “Here be Dragons,” as far as geologists are concerned.

Faraz Rahman (left) and Jasmin Green, known collectively as “Jafar” look over the open water of Lake Matoaka with Kurt.
Going viral

Lake Matoaka has a thriving and diverse population of viruses living in its waters. And that’s good.

Mathew Wawersik
One of a thousand

You have to look pretty closely to find Matthew Wawersik's name on this paper. The list of authors and their affiliations goes on for most of four pages.

Catherine Wise ’15 discusses progress on her nickel catalyst with Assistant Professor of Chemistry William McNamara
Taking a leaf from nature

William & Mary chemist William McNamara is taking a “bio-inspired” approach to the world’s energy crisis by turning to nature’s very own chemical power plant: photosynthesis.

Mary Seward, a graduate student in biology
High anxiety

A team of biologists at William & Mary has begun a long-term experiment to determine what is behind the degradation of the College Woods ecosystem.

Lessons from Polynesia

Environmental change is nothing new in Polynesia. For centuries, the inhabitants of the volcanic, sea-battered islands have been employing a variety of strategies to adapt to their changing landscapes.

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