Notes & Curiosities

Bryan Watts uses a caliber to take several measurements of an eaglet as Bart Paxton helps to steady the bird.
Leaving the nest

Shane Lawler was taking care of business in a loblolly pine, 90 feet above Gospel Spreading Farm, unfazed by the agitated bald eagles spiraling around his head. "All right!" he yelled to Bryan Watts, waiting at the base of the tree. "I've got one bird in a bag."

Dara Kharabi ’17 demonstrates his hack
At tribeHacks '16

Some visitors to tribeHacks stepped out of Small Hall onto the William & Mary campus on Sunday to enjoy a bit of sun before the presentations got under way. They saw four students, carrying a pair of quadcopters, making their way toward the door.

Physicist Irina Novikova participates in all three aspects of the scientific peer-review process
Peering inside peer review

The peer-review process does for science what the checks and balances system is supposed to do for American government.

Haitao Xu reports for work on the Alibaba corporate campus in Hangzhou, China.
A digital detective

Online ratings and reviews are a helpful, if imperfect, guide for potential customers.

Latin-literate physics student Jackson Olsen ’16 displays William & Mary’s copy of Isaac Newton’s Principia
An open-book mystery

There is a bit of a mystery surrounding a book at William & Mary.

Ellison Orcutt inspects an Ipswich sparrow held by CCB biologist Fletcher Smith
A day of Ipswiching

The subdued color palette of this habitat is reminiscent of west Texas.

An 18th-century brewery?

All signs indicate that a brew house once stood in the shadow of the Wren Building, but those inclined to toast the rediscovery of a facility that slaked thirsts at William & Mary 300 years ago should really wait until the lab results are in.

Le Mangeur de Bleuets

Over the songs of Swainson’s thrush and white-throated sparrows come the soothing calls of approaching whimbrels. Soon 24 birds in formation appear over the tree line and begin a wide circle over the blueberry field.

At TribeHacks

H. Wade Minter, the chief technology officer at a company that provides web and mobile services to five million users, stood in Swem Library, looked out upon the frantic final minutes of William & Mary’s first 24-hour hackathon and talked about the influence of the liberal arts on computer science.

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