Campus COLL 300: Visitors

Among the criteria adopted for the Campus COLL 300: "bring the world to W&M" through instructional content and significant involvement of students and faculty with COLL 300 campus visitors - a fruitful experience of disorientation that allows students to see their own lives in broader perspective.

In a typical semester the CLA supports campus COLL 300 courses by hosting three campus visitors related to that semester's theme. Each visitor presents a public event and engages smaller groups of students and faculty in ways that support the goals of COLL 300. Visits generally span several or more days.

Each visitor's public event parallels the semester's theme and stems from some aspect of their life other than scholarly expertise. This may take the form of readings, conversations, performances, presentations of general and scholarly interest, or some combination of all of these – or something entirely different. 

Below are descriptions for Campus COLL 300 visitors for the 2018-19 academic year.  If you are a faculty member interested in proposing a visitor for the 2019-20 academic year, please email [[biboon, Ben Boone]], Associate Director of the CLA.

Visitors for Spring 2019: "Ceremony"

  • Selena Fox, priestess, co-executive director of Circle Sanctuary. Selena has travelled the globe and made an impressive impact on the worlds of Wiccan faith, transpersonal counseling, women’s religious liberty, and environmental justice. Her work advocating for equality began as a student at William & Mary, when she founded the first women’s activist group on campus, and continues today as she leads Lady Liberty League. Her work as a priestess focuses on the ceremonies of nature and the Nature Spirituality that she has celebrated since 1973.
  • Setsuko Thurlow is a hibakusha — a survivor of the 1945 atom bombs. She was a 13-year-old schoolgirl living in Hiroshima when the bomb dropped. She has spent the seven decades since testifying to the horror of nuclear weapons and campaigning for a world free of them. The hibakusha fulfill the ceremonial role of story-teller in that there is a long-held belief that only those with first-hand experiences have the cultural authority to speak about the event. As the number of hibakusha decline, there is even greater urgency to share that story.

  • Anderson Silva Argolo, Patrick Santos Da Silva, and Urania de Oliveira Rodrigues 

    will share their knowledge of sacred Afro-Brazilian Candomblé rituals and ceremonies, and offer insightful perspectives on the politics of race and gender in Brazil’s changing religious landscape. Each has had unique experiences as Candomblé practitioners, spiritual leaders, and political activists. Complementing each other in their visits to classes and in public lectures/performances, they will address the importance and relevance of ceremony as both a link to an African past and a means of negotiating the present and future in Brazil.

Past Visitors