William & Mary

Faculty books published in 2018

The following books were authored or edited by William & Mary faculty members and published in 2018. Books are listed in alphabetical order within the following categories: arts & sciences and law. Additional categories may be added throughout the year as more books are published. The information contained herein was submitted by the authors. Additional books may be submitted via this online form. - Ed.

Arts & Sciences
 
Albert Luthuli

By Robert Trent Vinson, Associate Professor of History

From Amazon: This book recovers the important but largely forgotten story of Albert Luthuli, Africa's first Nobel Peace Prize winner and president of the African National Congress from 1952 to 1967. One of the most respected African leaders, Luthuli linked South African antiapartheid politics with other movements, becoming South Africa's leading advocate of Mahatma Gandhi's nonviolent civil disobedience techniques.

Published by Ohio University Press, 2018 | More information


The Cinema of Cuba: Contemporary Film and the Legacy of Revolution

By Ann Marie Stock, Vice Provost for Academic & Faculty Affairs

The book provides a comprehensive overview of the history of current filmmaking practices in Cuba as well as "snapshots" of media artists working today. Chapters celebrate the shared creativity as well as diversity of Cuban cinema, including both productions of the Cuban film institute (ICAIC) and those working on the industry margins. The films analyzed reveal a driving cinematic force through social criticism, the emphasis of debate and historical change, reassessments of gender relations, the use of new technologies and much more.

Published by I.B. Taurus, 2018 | More information


Face-to-Face Diplomacy: Social Neuroscience and International Relations

By Marcus Holmes, Associate Professor of Government (effective July 1)

Face-to-face diplomacy has long been the lynchpin of world politics, yet it is largely dismissed by scholars of International Relations as unimportant. Marcus Holmes argues that dismissing this type of diplomacy is in stark contrast to what leaders and policy makers deem as essential and that this view is rooted in a particular set of assumptions that see an individual's intentions as fundamentally inaccessible. Building on recent evidence from social neuroscience and psychology, Holmes argues that this assumption is problematic. Marcus Holmes studies some of the most important moments of diplomacy in the twentieth century, from 'Munich' to the end of the Cold War, and by showing how face-to-face interactions allowed leaders to either reassure each other of benign defensive intentions or pick up on offensive intentions, his book challenges the notion that intentions are fundamentally unknowable in international politics, a central idea in IR theory.

Published by Cambridge University Press, 2018 | More information


Frenemies: How Social Media Polarizes America

By Jaime Settle, Associate Professor of Government

Why do Americans have such animosity for people who identify with the opposing political party? Jaime E. Settle argues that in the context of increasing partisan polarization among American political elites, the way we communicate on Facebook uniquely facilitates psychological polarization among the American public. Frenemies introduces the END Framework of social media interaction. END refers to a subset of content that circulates in a social media ecosystem: a personalized, quantified blend of politically informative 'expression', 'news', and 'discussion' seamlessly interwoven into a wider variety of socially informative content. Scrolling through the News Feed triggers a cascade of processes that result in negative attitudes about those who disagree with us politically. The inherent features of Facebook, paired with the norms of how people use the site, heighten awareness of political identity, bias the inferences people make about others' political views, and foster stereotyped evaluations of the political out-group.

To be published by Cambridge university Press, fall 2018 | More information


A Genealogy of Terror in Eighteenth-Century France

By Ronald Schechter, Professor of History

From website blurb: The story of the evolution of the term 'terror' in Western thought before and after the French Revolution. Schechter argues that terror is not an import to Western civilization's contemporary discourse often suggest — but rather a domestic product with a long and consequential tradition.

Published by University of Chicago Press, 2018 | More information


Hume, Passion, and Action

By Elizabeth S. Radcliffe, Professor of Philosophy

Many thinkers believe that reason and passion oppose one another for control of our actions and that our lives go better when reason governs. Eighteenth-century philosopher, David Hume, argues that this picture is mistaken because reason cannot move us to action on its own and so cannot be opposed to passion in this way. This book presents an original interpretation and defense of the meaning of Hume's unorthodox claims about motivation, arguing that passion is essential to motivation and that the passions can be managed to promote a tranquil life.

Published by Oxford University Press, June 2018 | More information


The Imagination in Hume's Philosophy: The Canvas of the Mind

By Timothy M. Costelloe, Professor of Philosophy 

An investigation of Hume's view of the imagination and the role it plays in the various subjects he treats, including metaphysics, morals and politics, aesthetics, history, religion and the practice of philosophy itself. 

Published by Edinburgh University Press, May 2018 | More information


Le Hantage: Un ouvrage de souvenance

By Nathan Rabalais, Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies

In his first book of original poetry, Nathan Rabalais presents a layered and poignant account of the process of handling memories and trauma. Accompanying photographs of haunting images — from the cemeteries of New Orleans to the beaches of Nova Scotia — make this work visually striking. Written in a French deeply rooted in Louisiana, Rabalais's unique imagery and wordplay represent a new voice in francophone Louisiana literature.

Published by Les Cahiers du Tintamarre, June 2018 | More information


Market Ethics and Practices, c.1300–1850

Co-edited by Simon Middleton, Associate Professor of History (with James E. Shaw)

This book analyzes the nature, development and operation of market ethics in the context of social practices, ranging from rituals of exchange and unofficial expectations to law, institutions and formal regulations from the late medieval through to the modern era.

Published by Routledge, 2018 | More information


Orlando: A Biography (Cambridge Edition)

By Suzanne Raitt, Chancellor Professor of English and Chair of the English Department

Orlando, a novel loosely based on the life of Vita Sackville-West, Virginia Woolf's lover and friend, is one of Woolf's most playful and tantalizing works. This edition provides readers with a fully collated and annotated text. A substantial introduction charts the birth of the novel in the romance between Woolf and Sackville-West, and the role it played in the evolution and eventual fading of that romance. Extensive explanatory notes reveal the extent to which the novel is embedded in Woolf's knowledge of Sackville-West, her family history and her writings. Thorough annotation of every literary and historical allusion in the text establishes its significance as a parodic literary and social history of England, as well as a spoof of one of Woolf's favorite forms, the biography. It also includes all variants from the extant proofs, as well as editions of the novel produced during Woolf's lifetime.

Published by Cambridge University Press, June 2018 | More information


Probability, Second Edition

By Lawrence Leemis, Professor of Mathematics

This book provides a calculus-based introduction to probability that includes all of the traditional topics, along with a secondary emphasis on Monte Carlo simulation. Topics include counting techniques, set theory, probability calculations, conditional probability, the rule of Bayes, discrete, continuous and mixed random variables, joint probability distributions, expected values, covariance, correlation, transformations of random variables and limit theorems.

Published by Lightning Source, 2018 | More information


Programming with MATLAB for Scientists: A Beginner's Introduction

By Eugeniy E. Mikhailov, Assistant Professor of Physics

From CRC Press: This book offers an introduction to the basics of MATLAB programming to scientists and engineers. The author leads with engaging examples to build a working knowledge, specifically geared to those with science and engineering backgrounds. The reader is empowered to model and simulate real systems, as well as present and analyze everyday data sets. In order to achieve those goals, the contents bypass excessive "under the hood" details, and instead gets right down to the essential, practical foundations for successful programming and modeling. 

Published by CRC Press, January 2018 | More information


Queering the Redneck Riviera: Sexuality and the Rise of Florida Tourism

By Jerry T. Watkins III, Visiting Assistant Professor of History

From Amazon: (This book) recovers the forgotten and erased history of gay men and lesbians in North Florida, a region often overlooked in the story of the LGBTQ experience in the United States. Jerry Watkins reveals both the challenges these men and women faced in the years following World War II and the essential role they played in making the Emerald Coast a major tourist destination.

Published by University Press of Florida, 2018 | More information


Skepticism and American Faith from the Revolution to the Civil War

By Christopher Grasso, Professor of History

From Amazon: Between the American Revolution and the Civil War, the dialogue of religious skepticism and faith shaped struggles over the place of religion in politics. It produced different visions of knowledge and education in an "enlightened" society and fueled social reform in an era of economic transformation, territorial expansion, and social change. It also molded the making and eventual unmaking of American nationalism.

Published by Oxford University Press, 2018 | More information


Spinning the Compass

By M. Lee Alexander, Senior Lecturer and W. Taylor Reveley, III Interdisciplinary Faculty Fellow in the Department of English

A book-length collection of place and travel poetry. New and selected poems by M. Lee Alexander.

Published by Aquillrelle Press (Belgium), 2018 | More information


Visible Dissent: Latin American Writers, Small U.S. Presses, and Progressive Social Change

By Teresa V. Longo, Professor of Hispanic Studies, Dean for Interdisciplinary Studies and Director of the Charles Center

In Visible Dissent, Teresa Longo proposes that North America's dissident literature has its roots in the Latin American literary tradition. Locating the work of artists and writers alongside that of scholars and legal advocates, Visible Dissent unveils the staying-power of committed writing and honors the cross-currents and on-the-ground implications of humane political engagement.

Published by University of Iowa Press, The New American Canon Series, May 2018 | More information


Law
Fiduciary Government
By Evan J. Criddle, Professor of Law (with several co-editors)

The idea that the state is a fiduciary to its citizens has a long pedigree — ultimately reaching back to the ancient Greeks, and including Hobbes and Locke among its proponents. This book develops new accounts of how fiduciary principles apply to representation; to officials and judges; to problems of legitimacy and political obligation; to positive rights; to the state itself; and to the history of ideas.

To be published by Cambridge University Press, October 2018 | More information

Liberal Child Welfare Policy and its Destruction of Black Lives
By James G. Dwyer, Arthur B. Hanson Professor of Law and Cabell Research Professor of Law

The book identifies a pattern of adult-protective stances by liberals who dominate child welfare law and policy that prevent the reforms needed to end the inter-generational cycle of poverty and dysfunction in inner-city American neighborhoods. It describes the needed reforms and presents a defense of them grounded in children's rights. It examines the values and commitments underlying liberal opposition to child-centered reform and also explains why conservatives are likely to be far more receptive in this particular context to putting the interests of children above those of adults.

Published by Routledge, June 2018 | More information