Courses

Courses in Kinesiology & Health Sciences explore the human body: it's anatomy, function and development. If you are considering a Kinesiology & Health Sciences major, start here. It will also help if you talk to a faculty advisor for help with choosing courses that will help you meet your goals.

Most of our courses are lecture courses, but several have teaching laboratories that complement the lecture material. These lab courses teach you to apply the concepts presented in the lectures. For example, in the Microbes Laboratory, you will learn to isolate and identify the bacteria you learn about in the lecture. These labratories also teach technical skills that are useful in many careers.

You may earn course credit through independent research, work in faculty laboratories, or internships.

Not a major?

If you wish to sample a Kinesiology & Health Sciences course, but don't want to be one of our majors, look for courses with no prerequisites (For Anyone). Our KINE 100 (Critical Questions) and KINE 150 (First-Year Seminar) courses meet the COLL 100 and 150 requirements and are open to all freshmen. Other courses meet COLL 200 or Knowledge Domain requirements.

Courses

Not all courses are available every semester. Check the course schedule to see which courses will be taught in upcoming semesters. Check the Open Course List to see if a course you're interested in has available seats. See the Undergraduate Course Catalog for the official list of all courses.

Linked syllabi are in pdf format.

KINE 100. Eating: Nutrition, Digestion, Appetite

(COLL 100)
Syllabus
A combination of lecture and discussion, this course covers basic human nutrition, the physiology of taste and digestion, and the control of appetite through examination of the current scientific/medical literature. This course will develop student presentation and scientific inquiry skills.

KINE 100. Public Health & Physical Activity

(COLL 100)
Syllabus
From a young age, children hear from teachers, parents, and commercials that being physically active promotes health. But if being active is that simple, then why don't more people exercise regularly? And why do we have an obesity epidemic in the U.S.? In this course, we will examine why telling people to "work out" is insufficient. We will investigate physical activity from a Public Health perspective and examine aspects of our world that facilitate or hinder physical activity. We will question why we tend to blame individuals for their poor health behaviors, instead of looking at the complex social, economic, and environmental factors that may overwhelm individual motivation to live a healthier life. Throughout the course, students will collaborate with peers on projects that model real-world Public Health practice.

KINE 150. Physiology of the Marathon

(COLL 150)
Syllabus
An introduction to the basic principles of exercise physiology and human performance with a focus on the marathon. The course also addresses principles of training, nutrition, biomechanics and running related injuries as well as the intersection of physiological versus psychological limitations of endurance performance. Additionally, this course provides an opportunity for students to develop their reading, writing and oral communication skills using topics related to the marathon.

KINE 150. Exercise at Earth's Extremes

(COLL 150)
This course will examine the perils of exercise in extreme environments through thoroughly distilling decades of scientific study regarding exercise in hostile environments. The course will cover how to maintain optimal health and fitness during work or exercise in a multitude of stressful environments. Numerous environmental conditions are covered: heat, high altitude, humidity, air pollution, cold, wind-chill, day length, air ions, and underwater pressure.

KINE 150. Liberal Arts Frontiers of Health and Human Movement

(COLL 150)
The course is designed to introduce first year students to the full spectrum of liberal arts perspectives that may be used to study Health and Human Movement. It engages students in intensive discussion, writing and reading about the application of liberal arts approaches to health and human movement in general and to research and develop a portfolio on health and human performance phenomena, such as the health emphasis on Exercise as Medicine and the movement performance emphasis on the Olympic Games.

KINE 150. Nutrition in Health and Disease

(COLL 150)
Syllabus
This course will examine how specific components of foods may (or may not) impact our health and disease conditions. Nutrition science is relatively new and is therefore susceptible to exploitation by unscrupulous people. Many people do not know what to believe when they hear about or read conflicting reports concerning nutrition and health. This course will encourage its participants to search existing peer-reviewed literature in a thoughtful way in order to establish a basis for critical evaluation of the current level of understanding of nutrition in health and disease.

KINE 200. Introduction to the Human Body

(COLL 200, NQR) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
A broad-based examination of the human body. Structure and function of cells, tissues, and organ systems will be examined in a variety of applications such as lifespan, environmental and evolutionary adaptations. This course is not appropriate for premed students.

KINE 204. Introduction to Kinesiology & Health Sciences

(NQR) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
An introduction to the study of human movement with emphasis upon historical, philosophical, socio-cultural, physiological, biomechanical and psychological aspects. This course provides an integrated set of general principles which are an appropriate preparation for further study in kinesiology and health sciences.

KINE 270. Foundations of Epidemiology

(For Anyone)
An introduction to the core concepts of epidemiology, which is a study of the distribution of disease within a population and the factors that influence that distribution. The course will apply an epidemiologic lens to current issues in public health and clinical medicine.

KINE 280. Introduction to Public Health

(For Anyone)
Syllabus - Obasanjo
An introduction to the key concepts and considerations in public health research and practice. Selected public health topics will be presented from biomedical, epidemiologic, socio-cultural, and policy perspectives In the context of low, middle, and high-Income countries.

KINE 290. Introduction to Global Health

(COLL 200, NQR) (For Anyone)
Syllabus - Obasanjo
Syllabus - Scott
The course will introduce students to health issues around the world. Emphasis will be placed on social, economic, political, and environmental determinants of health, and health inequities.

KINE 295. Health-related Exercise Prescription

(For Anyone)
Syllabus
This course addresses the scientific basis of designing exercise programs to promote health among individuals of all ages, and both sexes. Special concerns (e.g. pregnancy, pre-diabetes, arthritis) will also be featured. It will NOT address the conditioning of elite athletic performance. Principles of overload, progression, and specificity are covered as well as intensity, frequency, duration, and mode. Various methods of training (endurance, Interval, resistance, cross-training) are featured. Finally, the detrimental effects of disuse, such as limb Immobilization or bed rest, will be discussed.

KINE 300. Social & Behavorial Science in Health

Syllabus
Prerequisites: KINE 280
This course will introduce students to historical and current applications of the social and behavioral sciences in health research and practice. It will explore social and behavioral science approaches, models, and theories that relate to health, as well as their philosophical roots. The course also will examine social and behavioral determinants of health equity. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of the social and behavioral sciences in addressing public health problems, both domestically and globally.

KINE 301. Public Health & Physical Activity

(For Anyone)
The course will explore behavioral, social, and environmental determinants of physical activity. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of these issues to the obesity epidemic, and to widening health disparities based on class and race.

KINE 303. Human Anatomy

(NQR)
Syllabus
Prerequisites: KINE 200 or BIOL 203 or BIOL 204 or BIOL 220 or BIOL 225.
Gross and histological study of the human organism with particular emphasis on the neuro-muscular systems as related to human movement.

KINE 304. Human Physiology

(NQR)
Syllabus
Prerequisites: KINE 200 or BIOL 203 or BIOL 204 or BIOL 220 or BIOL 225.
Detailed study of the manner in which different organ systems of the human body function.

KINE 305. Human Physiology Lab

(Teaching Lab)
Corequisite or prerequisite: KINE 304.
This laboratory takes the structures of the human body and examines how this is directly related to the functions of the human body. Students are able to have a hands on experience with physiology by laboratory simulations of the processes that occur in the body. The course begins with an examination of tissue types and a discussion of how the distribution of these throughout the body is related to physiological function. In the lab, the students carry out experiments that illustrate the functions of the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, and muscular system with the use of computer programs that allow for accurate measurement and calculations. The students also are able to work with compounds in the lab that illustrate the functions of the digestive system through actual enzyme digestion of food products within test tubes. The final two labs in this course utilize human urine and blood samples to give students the opportunity to conduct tests that would be run in a laboratory setting, including salt concentration of urine and blood typing.

Two laboratory hours.

KINE 308/308L. Biomechanics of Human Movement

(Teaching Lab)
Syllabus
Prerequisite: KINE 303. Corequisite: KINE 308L.
This laboratory examines the mechanics of the body during movement. Some have described this as a detailed description of performance technique such as in walking, running, or throwing. Students use high speed cameras to record and analyze their technique during two speeds of running. They also investigate the forces between their shoes and the floor during walking. In another lab, students measure external forces and then calculate the much greater amount of force in their muscles during a knee extension exercise and an elbow flexor exercise. The last lab of the semester involves measuring when muscles turn on and turn off to produce specific movements with a technique called electromyography.

Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

KINE 310. Microbes in Human Disease

(NQR)
Prerequisites
: KINE 200 or BIOL 203 or BIOL 204 or BIOL 220 or BIOL 225 
An introductory course investigating microbes and their impact on human health. Topics to include pathogens of humans, their mechanism of action, their clinical relevance in the US and abroad, functions of the immune system and current medical practices to protect humans from infection.

KINE 311. Microbes in Human Health Laboratory

(Teaching Lab)
Corequisite or prerequisite: KINE 310.
This laboratory focuses on some of the smallest organisms that have an effect on the human body. This course will introduce microbiological techniques in order to allow students to understand prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, focusing mainly on bacterial organisms. Students are able to learn aseptic technique in order to grow and test different bacterial pathogens. Within this lab, students use microbiological methods, such as streak plating and staining, to effectively isolate a bacterial sample and determine its identity through biochemical testing. At the end of the semester, students learn how to conduct a test that is similar to what is used in clinical laboratories for rapid organism identification.

KINE 314 & 315. Dissection Human Anatomy Lab

(Teaching Lab)
Syllabus
Corequisite or prerequisite: KINE 303.
This laboratory provides students with an opportunity to learn about the human body through detailed dissections of human cadavers. Groups of four students per cadaver discuss and then dissect to learn the true size, shape, and organization of body structures. The experience helps to prepare students for graduate study in medicine, physical therapy, and other health fields. Though not required, Kinesiology & Health Sciences students are encouraged to take this laboratory course during the same semester that they take the human anatomy lecture course (KINE 303).

Four laboratory hours. There is a $85.00 fee associated with this course.

KINE 315. Human Anatomy Lab

(Teaching Lab)
Syllabus
Corequisite or prerequisite: KINE 303.
This laboratory provides students with an opportunity to learn about the human body through detailed dissections of human cadavers. Groups of four students per cadaver discuss and observe to learn the true size, shape, and organization of body structures. The experience helps to prepare students for graduate study in medicine, physical therapy, and other health fields. Though not required, Kinesiology & Health Sciences students are encouraged to take this laboratory course during the same semester that they take the human anatomy lecture course (KINE 303).

Four laboratory hours. There is a $85.00 fee associated with this course.

KINE 320. Issues in Health

(For Anyone)
Syllabus
Contemporary issues in health are examined. These issues include immunity and AIDS; cancer and genetics; cardiovascular health and assisted suicides and abortion.

KINE 321. Health and Human Movement

(For Anyone)
A survey of several contemporary topics in health including but not limited to mental/emotional health, cardiovascular health, human sexuality, nutrition, psychoactive drugs, alcohol and ethical issues.

KINE 322. Motor Learning

(NQR) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
An introduction to the principles and concepts of learning basic to the acquisition and performance of physical skills. Factors and conditions affecting skill learning will be stressed. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications in instructional setting.

KINE 323. Health Policy 

Prerequisites: KINE 280
This course will prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to think critically about current health policy. This is an undergraduate course that introduces the fundamental characteristics and organizational structures of the US health system as well as the differences in systems in other countries and global governance of health.  Students will study the basic concepts of legal, ethical, economic and regulatory dimensions of health care and public health and the roles, influences and responsibilities of the different agencies and branches of government. Basic concepts of public health communication, including technical and professional writing and presentation will be studied.

KINE 325. Environmental Issues in Public Health

Prerequisites: KINE 270 and KINE 280
This course explores how the environment impacts human health. It introduces the methods used to study environmental health, surveys the nature and control of environmental hazards, and touches on some hot topics and current controversies in the field.

KINE 335. Play, Sport and Culture

(For Anyone)
An interdisciplinary examination of the significance of play, sport and other forms of human movement as socio-cultural phenomena. The course incorporates cross cultural analysis of play as an acculturation process and sport as an established institution.

KINE 340. Motor Development

(For Anyone)
Syllabus
This course is designed to examine the growth and development of motor skills throughout the entire life span, and to investigate the changes in motor development from childhood and adolescence through older adulthood.

KINE 350. Science of Nutrition

(COLL 200, NQR) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
An introductory course beginning with the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal system. Individual nutrients will be discussed and there will be an in depth treatment of life cycle nutrition issues.

KINE 352. Nutrition and the Brain

(COLL 200, NQR) (For Anyone)
Meets Writing Requirement for KINE majors
Although the science of nutrition and brain function is relatively new and is still evolving, certain nutrients in foods are known to be essential to human brain function. Through exploration of past and current research in the area of nutrition science, students will be exposed to the development of the body of literature exploring the effects of various nutrients found in food and how these nutrients affect the brain and subsequent behavior.

KINE 354. Nutrition in Health & Disease

(COLL 200, CSI) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
This course is designed to present both core nutrition information as well as nutrition guidelines regarding the reduction of risk of chronic diseases as well as diet therapy during illness. Coverage of current research topics will elucidate specialty areas and advanced subjects. Another component of this course is to help students of nutrition evaluate information and products available from the media, colleagues, and the marketplace.

KINE 355. International Nutrition

(For Anyone)
This course uses physiologic, socio-cultural, and political-economic perspectives and multiple theoretical frameworks to examine the causes and consequences of poor nutrition in the global context, with an emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. 

KINE 356. Public Health Nutrition: Concepts & Controversies

(College 200, NQR) (For Anyone)
This is a hybrid course taught both online and face-to-face. It is only available during summer session I and requires one week of residence in Washington, DC. Four weeks of asynchronous online learning is interspersed with a week of daily three-hour face-to-face meetings in the W&M Washington, DC Center. While in Washington, DC, students will also participate in active learning site visit assignments available only in the DC area. (This course is anchored in the NQR domain, and also considers aspects of the CSI domain.)

KINE 359. Medical Pharmacology

Syllabus
Prerequisite
: KINE 304
This course will introduce students to the general principles of pharmacology and the common medications that they may encounter while working in a clinical setting.  Emphasis will be on general classifications of drugs and their mechanisms of action as well as memorization of some of the most commonly prescribed medications. 

KINE 360. Physiology of Aging

(NQR) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
An introduction to the theories of aging, the physiological changes associated with aging, and common diseases of aging.Class discussion involves a survey of the basic scientific literature in aging research.

KINE 365. Current Scholarship in Kinesiology & Health Sciences

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required.
Issues will be studied in conjunction with attendance at a regional or national professional meeting. Graded pass/fail. This class may be repeated for credit.

KINE 369. Methods and Analysis in International Community Health and Development

(COLL 300) (For Anyone)
This course introduces the core methods and data analysis techniques for projects in engaged scholarship focused on participatory development strategies and community health.  It was developed through ongoing work with projects known as Student Organization for Medical Outreach and Sustainability (SOMOS) and Medical Aid Nicaragua: Outreach Scholarship.  Both of these projects began as a student initiatives in service learning.  The project founders sought a different model for student engagement and articulated concerns about the marginalization of regions, nations, communities, and people and about the arrogance of international development interventions.  They expressed skepticism about the value of ungrounded approaches to helping.
Through ongoing partnership efforts in Paraiso, Dominican Republic and Cuje, Nicaragua, we have sought ways to partner effectively and respectfully with residents and communities.  We have used basic methods of ethnography, GIS, and social networks analysis (SNA) to collect and analyze data to describe the communities and to understand local arragnements that could support collaboration and collective capacity.  Seeking best practices and strategies has resulted in ongoing efforts to develop a refined model of participatory development that relies on community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods and emphasizes community collective decision-making, solidarity, and action over external expertise, direction, and guidance.

KINE 380. Introduction to Clinical Practice

(For Anyone)
This course addresses principles of contemporary health care. Students are introduced to concepts in quality practice and economic issues affecting current health care delivery.

KINE 393. Health Ethics

(COLL 400) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
Meets Writing Requirement
An introduction to health-related ethical problems and the nature of ethical reasoning. Emphasis upon ethical problem-solving in personal, public, and environmental health for Kinesiology and Environmental Science/Studies majors.

KINE 394. Statistics and Evaluation

(NQR, MATH) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
An introduction to the use of statistics within the process of evaluation. Descriptive and inferential statistical procedures including confidence intervals, correlation, t-tests, and analysis of variance are covered. Proper application of those procedures during the evaluation of data is emphasized.

KINE 400. Sport Psychology

(For Anyone)
This course is designed as an introduction to the study of psychological dimensions to sport. Various topics which will be included: behavior change in sport, motivation, personality factors and the elite athlete. Structure of the course also allows the student to investigate topics of individual interest.

KINE 401. Neurophysiology of Aging

(COLL 400, NQR) (For Anyone)
A seminar course designed to provide in-depth knowledge of the physiological changes in the nervous system with aging (including common pathologies affecting learning/memory, motor control, vision, and hearing) and to refine skills needed to evaluate and synthesize the scientific literature. This course includes lectures on each topic, systematic analysis and discussion of the scientific literature, construction of an original research proposal, and oral presentation of the proposal.

KINE 403. The Social Determinants of Health: Living and Dying in the USA

(For Anyone)
An exploration of the conditions in which individuals are born, live, work, and age as determinants of health outcomes. Such conditions as race, class, sexual orientation, income, zip code, and job security and autonomy will be considered. To be explored are such health domains as adverse birth outcomes; injuries and homicides; adolescent pregnancy; HIV-AIDS; addiction; heart disease; chronic lung disease; mental health, and age-related disability. Readings include newspaper and magazine accounts; medical journals; and such texts as U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health (National Research Council and Institute of Medicine, (on-line) and M. Marmot, The Status Syndrome (N.Y. :Holt, 2004).

KINE 404. Global Health Issues

(For Anyone)
This course will offer a cross cultural comparative analysis of the definitions of health and health care delivery, as well as an overview of specific chronic and acute health issues. The course will address global health broadly and focus on global health disparity. We will analyze disparity with a multidisciplinary perspective, evaluating the political, economic, and sociocultural aspects of health inequality. Special topics in this course will focus on health care and health issues of women.

KINE 405. Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health

Syllabus
Prerequisite: KINE 270 or KINE 280 or KINE 290 or instructor permission.
Meets Writing Requirement.
The course will explore medical and social aspects of maternal, neonatal, and child health, with emphasis on health systems and the continuum of care for women and children. Basic knowledge of global health or epidemiology is expected.

KINE 406. Public Health Research Issues

(COLL 400)
Syllabus
Prerequisite: KINE 270 and KINE 280 and one of: KINE 290, KINE 300, KINE 325, or KINE 405 
This course will allow students to synthesize and apply knowledge from core Public Health courses. Students will engage with a range of current Public Health issues and research methodologies, conduct media analysis of Public Health research reporting, and utilize the research literature to develop proposals for multi-level interventions to address Public Health problems. Classes will be interactive and involve a blend of discussion, student presentations, group work, and in-class activities.

KINE 415. Public Health: Health Equity, Sustainability, and Well-Being in a Global Age

(For Anyone)
What matters for health and well-being? How do we build health opportunity, while also protecting the planet? Why, in the United States, does “wealth equal health”? This course will explore personal, economic, political, and environmental determinants of health equity. Emphasis will be placed on 1) holism and health and 2) socioecological frameworks of health. Students will engage with individuals and organizations in the Washington D.C. area that tackle these issues on a daily basis. Class sessions will be interactive and involve a blend of D.C. site visits, guest speakers, discussion, and lecture.

KINE 422. Motor Control

Prerequisite KINE 322.
Detailed study of issues associated with motor control. Drawing heavily from epistemology, neurology, cognitive science and motor behavior research the students will be expected to integrate and generalize such information to different clinical contexts.

KINE 442. Exercise Physiology

(NQR) (Teaching Lab)
Syllabus
Prerequisite: KINE 304 or consent of instructor. Corequisite: KINE 442L.
An in-depth study of the physiological aspects of exercise, fatigue, coordination, training and growth; functional tests with normal and abnormal subjects; investigations and independent readings.

LAB: This laboratory focuses on the physiological aspects of exercise, fatigue, and training. Students gain exposure to medical screening, vital sign assessment, and common clinical tests. For clinical testing, they learn how to use computer software and protocols to conduct submaximal and maximal aerobic tests, electrocardiograms, spirometry, and estimation of muscle fiber composition. In addition, students conduct field testing in areas such as anaerobic testing, body composition, and blood lactate.

KINE 450. Cardiovascular Physiology

(NQR)
Syllabus
Prerequisite: KINE 304 or BIOL 203 or BIOL 225 or consent of instructor.
A concentrated study of the normal function of the heart and blood vessels, coordinated responses of the cardiovascular system, and general features of cardiovascular diseases. Class discussion involves a survey of the basic scientific literature in cardiovascular research.

KINE 455. Physiology of Obesity

(COLL 400, NQR)
Syllabus
Prerequisite: KINE 304 or BIOL 203 or BIOL 225 or consent of instructor. Meets Writing Requirement
A seminar course examining the physiology of body weight regulation, mechanisms of diseases that are associated with obesity and inactivity, and the role of the fat cell and its secretions in the disease process.

KINE 460. Topics in Kinesiology & Health Sciences

Topics not covered in regular offerings. Subjects, prerequisites and instructor will vary from year to year. Course may be repeated if the topic varies.

KINE 461. Physiology Journal Club
(For Anyone)

Syllabus
This is a weekly seminar course in which students will read, present, and discuss recent, high-impact original research articles from the biomedical literature.  The emphasis will be on articles in the area of cardiovascular physiology, metabolism, aging physiology, and neuroscience with some flexibility to venture into other areas of physiology/medicine that are of particular interest to students.


KINE 470,471. Independent Study in Kinesiology& Health Sciences

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Meets Writing Requirement
An independent study program for the advanced student involving reading, research and the writing of a paper. Permission of instructor required. This course may be repeated for credit.

KINE 480,481. Kinesiology & Health Sciences Research

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Meets Writing Requirement
A course for the advanced student affording an opportunity for independent laboratory or field research under the supervision of a faculty member. Permission of instructor required. This course may be repeated for credit.

KINE 485. Cellular Basis of Neuromuscular Physiology

Syllabus
Prerequisite: KINE 304, BIOL 203 or BIOL 204 or BIOL 220 or BIOL 225 or consent of instructor.
A detail study of the neuromuscular system and its exercise-induced adaptations at the cellular and biochemical levels. Topics include the development of the neuromuscular system, organization of motor units, characteristics of different muscle fiber types, substrate utilization and causes of fatigue.

KINE 490. Kinesiology & Health Sciences Research Symposium
(COLL 400)
Co-Requisite(s):
 KINE 470, 471, 480, 481, 496, or 498

This course is a capstone experience whereby students will be expected to write a research paper presenting their results in a scientific manner to an informed audience. In addition, students' research findings will be presented in poster format using lay language and intended for a general audience, to be presented at the Kinesiology & Health Sciences Research Symposium held at the end of each semester.   This course satisfies the COLL 400 requirement for Independent Studies, Kinesiology Research, and Internship courses in this Department.

KINE 493 Philosophy in Kinesiology & Health Sciences

(COLL 200, ALV) (For Anyone)
Syllabus
Meets Writing Requirement
Philosophical principles in the context of human movement. Examination of the relationship of the mind and body and the distinctions between western and eastern attitudes towards the physical. Analysis of the ethics and the aesthetics of the kinesthetic dimension.

KINE 494. Environmental Human Physiology

Prerequisite: KINE 442 or consent of instructor.
Lectures and applied research will determine how heat, cold, high terrestrial altitude, hyperbaric conditions, and air pollution affect human performance.

KINE 495-496 Honors

Web Page
Meets Writing Requirement
Students admitted to Honors study in kinesiology will enroll for both semesters of their senior year. Requirements include

  1. supervised readings in the field of interest,
  2. the preparation and presentation by April 15 of an Honors essay or an Honors thesis based on the students own research, and
  3. satisfactory performance in an oral examination based on the Honors project and related background.

Consult the chair for eligibility, admission and continuance requirements.

KINE 498. Internship

(COLL 400)
Prerequisite
: Kinesiology & Health Sciences Major.
Meets Writing Requirement
A structured learning experience designed to complement and expand on the student"s academic course work. This course includes readings in related areas, portfolios, written reports and on-site supervision.

KINE 499. Internship

Kinesiology & Health Sciences Majors Only
A structured learning experience designed to complement and expand on the student’s academic course work. This course includes readings in related areas, portfolios, written reports and on-site supervision.  This course will not satisfy the COLL 400 requirement.