Jonathan Crock

Adjunct Lecturer of Government

Office: Tyler 362
Links: [[jmcrock, Email]] and {{https://www.jonathancrock.com/, Webpage}}
Office Hours: Tues & Thurs 9:30-11:30AM or By Appointment
Research Interests: Politico-economic Democracy, International Law, Human Rights Law, Intersectionality, Modern Monetary Theory

Background

Jonathan Crock researches the human right to democratic decision-making, focusing on new legal developments in rights of direct political democracy, economic democracy, workplace democracy, environmental democracy, democratic control of money as a public good, and a right to democratic decision-making in global governance. He has a particular interest in the growing use of randomly selected citizens’ assemblies (sortition)—which automatically achieve fifty percent participation of women drawn from a cross-section of socio-economic groups. Citizens' assemblies have been used widely including to address climate change and abortion reform in Ireland, constitution drafting in Iceland, and electoral reform in Canada. He focuses on empirical study of how such innovations in direct, participatory democracy can be used to help address the elite capture of policy outcomes in electoral democracy and technocratic rule in public and private governance that is at the root of rising inequality; structural racism, sexism, and classism; environmental catastrophe; and economic exploitation.

He is completing his Ph.D. in international law at Leiden University, Grotius Center for International Legal Studies. He has a master’s in international human rights law (Oxford), LL.B. law degree (London), postgraduate certificate in international relations and conflict analysis (Louvain), and bachelor’s in politics and international relations (London). His previous experience includes working at the U.S. Department of State’s Office of War Crimes Issues, U.S. Institute of Peace, Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, U.S. Department of the Treasury, U.S. Agency for International Development, Supreme Court of the United States, and as a foreign policy advisor on U.S. presidential campaigns. He has lived, worked, and traveled in over 80 countries and speaks French, Russian, and Polish.

Recent Publications

Jonathan Crock, “The Human Right to Democracy,” in Michael Stohl and Alison Brysk (eds.), A Research Agenda for Human Rights, Edward Elgar (forthcoming).

Courses

International Human Rights Law (GOVT 391)

International Law (GOVT 326)

Introduction to International Politics (GOVT 204)