Creative and Expository Writing Courses

Please see the on-line schedule for the most current information about courses offered.
WRIT 101. Writing.

Fall and Spring (3,3) Ashworth, Davis, Zuber.

Practice in writing under supervision, with frequent conferences. This course may be used to satisfy the lower-division writing requirement by students who are not exempted. Each section is limited to 16 students.

200-level: Introductory course

CRWR 212. Introduction to Creative Writing.
(GER 6) Fall and Spring (2,2) Alexander, Ashworth, Castleberry, Johnson, Pease.

Workshop format emphasizes the basics of writing fiction and poetry. Class meets for one two-hour session per week. No previous writing experience is required. Open to academic freshman and academic sophomores with priority given to academic freshmen. (Formerly ENGL 206)

300-level: Intermediate courses

*WRIT 300. Contemporary Theory and College Writing.
Spring (1) Zuber.

This course is designed to train students who have applied to work in the Writing Resources Center by analyzing the writing and speaking processes and the dynamics of one-on-one peer consultations.

CRWR 367. Advanced Expository Writing.
Fall and Spring (3,3) Lowry, Meyers, Melfi, Pease, Peterson, Schoenberger, Zuber.

Practice in writing papers of various types under supervision, emphasizing style and expository techniques. Sections limited to 15 students each. (Formerly ENGL 301)

*CRWR 368. Creative Writing: Fiction.
(GER 6) Fall and Spring (3,3) Johnson, Pease.

An opportunity for students to develop their abilities in imaginative writing of fiction under supervision. Sections limited to 15 students each. (Formerly ENGL 306)

*CRWR 369. Creative Writing: Poetry.
(GER 6) Fall and Spring (3,3) Pinson.

An opportunity for students to develop their abilities in imaginative writing of poetry under supervision. Sections limited to 15 students each. (Formerly ENGL 305)

400-level: Advanced courses

*CRWR 466. Seminar in Non-Fiction Writing.
Fall (3) Johnson.

A seminar in writing the kinds of non-fiction that appear regularly in magazines and newspapers, with reading for emulation in Didion, McPhee and others. Designed for students interested in writing careers. (Formerly ENGL 407)

*CRWR 467. Advanced Workshop in Fiction Writing.
Fall (3) Brackenbury, Schoenberger.

An advanced workshop in writing narrative fiction, with emphasis on short fiction, the novella or the screenplay, for students of demonstrated promise and achievement. If there is no duplication of topic, may be repeated for credit.

*CRWR 468. Advanced Workshop in Fiction Writing.
Spring (3) Johnson, Pease.

An advanced workshop in writing narrative fiction, with emphasis on short fiction, the novella or the screenplay, for students of demonstrated promise and achievement. If there is no duplication of topic, may be repeated for credit.

*CRWR 469. Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing.
Fall (3) Brackenbury.

An advanced workshop in poetry writing for students of demonstrated promise and achievement.

*CRWR 470. Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing.
Spring (3) Pinson.

An advanced workshop in poetry writing for students of demonstrated promise and achievement.

†CRWR 495-496. Honors.
Fall, Spring (3,3) Staff.

Honors study in English comprises (a) supervised reading in the field of the student's major interest; (b) presentation two weeks before the last day of classes of the student's graduating semester of an Honors essay or a creative writing project upon a topic approved by the departmental Honors committee; and (c) oral examination in the field of the student's major interest. Students who have not completed ENGL 494 may be admitted only under exceptional circumstances. Creative Writing Honors students may substitute for ENGL 494 either three Advanced Creative Writing courses, or two Advanced Creative Writing courses and a Creative Writing Independent Study (the project of the Independent Study must be different from the proposed Honors project). Creative Writing Honors involves the completion of a sustained project in creative writing. For College provisions governing the Admission to Honors, see page catalog section titled Honors and Special Programs.