Speakers

 Robert B. Archibald
Robert B. ArchibaldWilliam & Mary
Robert Archibald

Robert B. Archibald

William & Mary

Robert B. Archibald is Chancellor Professor of Economics at William & Mary where he has been on the faculty since 1976. Professor Archibald received his B.A. from the University of Arizona and a M.S. and Ph.D. from Purdue University. At William & Mary he has served as Chair of the Economics Department, Director of the Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy, Interim Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, President of the Faculty Assembly, and Faculty Representative to the Board of Visitors.

His current research focuses on higher education finance. He is the author of three books on higher education finance: Redesigning the Financial Aid System: Why Colleges and Universities Should Switch Roles with the Federal Government (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002) and, together with David H. Feldman, Why Does College Cost So Much? (Oxford University Press, 2011). He and Professor Feldman have a second book, The Road Ahead for America’s Colleges and Universities with Oxford University Press coming out in the summer of 2017.

 Sandy Baum
Sandy BaumUrban Institute
Sandy Baum

Sandy Baum

Urban Institute

Sandy Baum is a senior fellow in the Income and Benefits Policy Center at the Urban Institute and professor emerita of economics at Skidmore College. An expert on higher education finance, she speaks and writes extensively about issues relating to college access, college pricing, student aid policy, student debt, and affordability.

Since 2002, Baum has coauthored the College Board’s annual publications Trends in Student Aid and Trends in College Pricing. She is a member of the board of the National Student Clearinghouse and has chaired major study groups through the College Board and the Brookings Institution, developing proposals for reforming federal and state student aid. Baum's articles on higher education finance have been published in professional journals, books, and the trade press. Her recent work includes studies of how behavioral economics can inform student aid policy, a meaningful definition of college affordability, tuition and financial aid strategies for broad access public institutions, and the National Science Foundation–funded Educational Attainment: Understanding the Data. Baum’s book Student Debt: Rhetoric and Realities of Higher Education Financing was published by Palgrave-Macmillan in 2016. Baum earned her B.A. in sociology from Bryn Mawr College, where she serves on the board of trustees, and earned her Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University.

 Peter A. Blake
Peter A. BlakeState Council of Higher Education for Virginia
Peter Blake

Peter A. Blake

State Council of Higher Education for Virginia

Peter A. Blake joined the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) as interim director in 2011 and became director in January 2012. Blake previously worked at SCHEV as an associate director overseeing higher education analyses in the areas of faculty and staff compensation, higher education funding policies, academic libraries, distance learning and instructional technology, and student financial aid.

Blake left SCHEV in 1999 to serve as the legislative fiscal analyst for the Virginia General Assembly's House Appropriations Committee. From 2002-2006 he was deputy secretary of education and secretary of education under former Governor Mark Warner. He later served as the vice chancellor of workforce development services for the Virginia Community College System, where he led policy and budget development for state and federal workforce programs.

In July 2015, Blake was elected chair of the executive committee of SHEEO (State Higher Education Executive Officers), the national association for chief executives of statewide governing, policy and coordinating boards of postsecondary education. He had served as SHEEO's treasurer and chair of its budget and finance subcommittee.

Blake has served on boards of organizations including LEAD Virginia, the Virginia Commonwealth University Alumni Association, the Richmond Public Library, the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation and the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. Blake completed the Virginia Executive Institute and LEAD Virginia programs, as well as the Associates program through the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. He recently completed The Executive Program at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business. He holds B.A. and M.S. degrees from Virginia Commonwealth University.

 David Deming
David DemingHarvard University
David Deming

David Deming

Harvard University

Paper Title: "The Impacts of Price and Spending Subsidies on U.S. Postsecondary Attainment"

David Deming is a Professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is a co-editor of the Journal of Human Resources. His research focuses broadly on the economics of skill development, education and the labor market. Recent projects include a study of the growing importance of social skills in the labor market, and the impacts of price and spending subsidies on U.S. postsecondary attainment.

He is a William T. Grant Scholar, and he recently received the Early Career Award from the Association for Education Finance and Policy (AEFP). He earned his B.S./B.A. in economics and political science from Ohio State, his M.P.P. in Public Policy from the University of California at Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard.

 Pamela Eddy
Pamela EddyWilliam & Mary
Pamela Eddy

Pamela Eddy

William & Mary

Paper Title: "Can Community Colleges Make a Difference? Yes and No"

Pamela Eddy is a professor in Educational Policy, Planning, and Leadership at William & Mary. Her research interests include community college leadership and development, organizational change and educational partnerships, gender roles in higher education, and faculty development. Eddy serves as a consultant for campuses, system offices, and on funded grants regarding strategies to support community college student success and to support leadership development. Eddy is the author of Community College Leadership:  A Multidimensional Model for Leading Change and Partnerships and Collaborations in Higher Education. She is a co-author of Developing tomorrow's leaders:  Contexts, consequences, & competencies, Creating the future of faculty development: Learning from the past, understanding the present (with Sydow, Alfred, & Garza Mitchell), and Creating Strategic Partnerships:  A guide for educational institutions and their partners (with Amey).

Eddy has edited and written for several volumes of New Directions for Community Colleges and served as guest editor of special themed editions of the Community College Review and Community College Journal of Research and Practice. She serves on the editorial boards for Community College Journal of Research and Practice, Community College Enterprise, and Innovative Higher Education. Eddy was the President of the Council for the Study of Community Colleges 2011-2012. She received the 2006 emerging scholar award, the 2013 senior scholar award, and the 2016 service award from the Council for the Study of Community Colleges. Additionally, Eddy was recognized by the 2007 Central Michigan University Provost Award for Research and Creative Endeavors, the 2008 Central Michigan University Teaching Excellence Award Winner, and the 2011 Plumeri Award for Faculty Excellence at William & Mary. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Dublin, Ireland in 2009 and continues her research on partnerships there.

 David H. Feldman
David H. FeldmanWilliam & Mary
David Feldman

David H. Feldman

William & Mary

David H. Feldman teaches in the economics department at William & Mary. He chaired the department from 2011 to 2016. Before coming to William & Mary in 1989 he taught at Duke University and Colgate University. He earned his Ph.D. from Duke in 1983 and his A.B. in economics and political science from Kenyon College in 1978. His research examines theoretical and policy questions in the economics of higher education. Together with Robert B. Archibald, he is the author of Why Does College Cost so Much? (Oxford University Press, 2011). The book explores the economic forces driving college cost, tuition setting, and access. His next book, also co-authored with professor Archibald, is titled The Road Ahead for America’s Colleges and Universities (Oxford University Press, summer 2017).

In addition to his scholarly work, Feldman also writes about higher education issues for national news magazines, policy journals, and newspapers. In 2012, the National Association of Student Financial Aid Officers (NASFAA) gave him its Robert P. Huff Golden Quill Award for his work on college cost and financial aid. William & Mary honored him with a University Professorship for Teaching Excellence in 2006.

 Michael Halleran
Michael HalleranWilliam & Mary
Michael Halleran

Michael Halleran

William & Mary

Michael Halleran became William & Mary's fifth provost on July 1, 2009. He is also a professor of classical studies. As the university's chief academic officer, Halleran is responsible for all academic and research programs, academic budgets, institutional planning, space allocation and faculty development. He co-chairs the university's strategic planning and business innovation committees. He has played a leading role in implementing the William & Mary Promise, which increased access, affordability and predictability for in-state students, while providing more resources for university priorities. He established the Creative Adaptation Fund for curricular innovation, has expanded e-learning across the campus and, with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, created the W. Taylor Reveley, III Interdisciplinary Fellows Program. Halleran helped establish a Confucius Institute in partnership with Beijing Normal University, and has overseen a major increase in international students on campus and the success of the joint-degree program with the University of St Andrews, Scotland.

Halleran attended Kenyon College (A.B., 1975), where he graduated summa cum laude with high honors in Classics and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and received his M.A. (1978) and Ph.D. (1981) from Harvard University focusing his studies on the Greek and Roman classics. He served on the faculty at Connecticut College, the University of Washington and the University of Miami before coming to William & Mary. At the University of Washington he was chair of the classics department (1991-97) and then Divisional Dean for the Arts and Humanities (1997-2005), and served as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Miami (2005-09). His teaching and scholarship have focused on ancient Greek language, literature, intellectual history and mythology, and his publications (articles, books and translations) are primarily on Greek tragedy.
 Terry W. Hartle
Terry W. HartleAmerican Council on Education
Terry Hartle

Terry W. Hartle

American Council on Education

Terry W. Hartle is one of America's most effective and experienced advocates for higher education. At ACE, where he has served for more than 20 years, he directs comprehensive efforts to engage federal policymakers on a broad range of issues including student aid, government regulation, scientific research and tax policy. His work involves representation before the U.S. Congress, administrative agencies and the federal courts. As an expert voice on behalf of colleges and universities, he is quoted widely in the national and international media on higher education issues.

Given ACE's historic role in coordinating the government relations efforts of some 60 associations in the Washington-based higher education community, Hartle plays a central part in developing public policy positions that impact all colleges and universities, and also oversees the Council's external relations functions.

Prior to joining the council in 1993, Hartle served for six years as education staff director for the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources, then chaired by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. Prior to 1987, Hartle was director of social policy studies and resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and a research scientist at the Educational Testing Service. Hartle has authored or co-authored numerous articles, books, and national studies and contributes regular book reviews to The Christian Science Monitor.

Hartle received a doctorate in public policy from The George Washington University (DC), a master's in public administration from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University (NY) and a bachelor's degree in history (summa cum laude) from Hiram College (OH). He was awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree by Northeastern University (MA). He has received the Hiram College Alumni Achievement Award, and has been inducted into the Hiram College Athletic Hall of Fame. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
 Nicholas Hillman
Nicholas HillmanUniversity of Wisconsin at Madison
Nicholas Hillman

Nicholas Hillman

University of Wisconsin at Madison

Paper Title: "How Geography Shapes Postsecondary Opportunity"

Nicholas Hillman is an Associate Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Hillman’s research focuses on postsecondary finance and financial aid policy, primarily as they relate to college access and equity. This work includes research on student loan debt and default, performance-based funding, and college affordability.

He is a faculty affiliate in the LaFollette School of Public Affairs and Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education. Hillman earned his masters in public affairs and his Ph.D. in educational leadership and policy from Indiana University-Bloomington.

 Nicole F. Hurd
Nicole F. HurdCollege Advising Corps
Nicole Hurd

Nicole F. Hurd

College Advising Corps

Nicole Farmer Hurd, Ph.D. is the Founder and CEO of College Advising Corps. A passionate advocate of post secondary education, Nicole has led College Advising Corps from a pilot project in Virginia to the largest college access program in the country, placing hundreds of advisers in high-need schools from coast-to-coast. Under her leadership, the Advising Corps received the 2012 National Service Impact Award from the Corporation for National and Community Service for the "positive and lasting impact they are making through national service." Nicole was named to the Chronicle of Higher Education's 2014 Influence List.

Prior to launching College Advising Corps, Nicole served as an Assistant Dean and Director of the Center for Undergraduate Excellence at the University of Virginia. While there, she founded the College Guide Program that was the precursor to College Advising Corps. The College Guide Program received national attention and a $10 million grant from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation to expand into 10 additional states. Because of the growth and success of College Guides, Nicole was awarded the Governor of Virginia's Award for Volunteerism and Community Service in 2007.

While at the University of Virginia, Nicole taught in the Department of Religious Studies, worked with successful Rhodes, Marshall, Mitchell, Fulbright, and Truman Scholar candidates, and led the first university-wide Office of Undergraduate Research. Nicole remains active in higher education, teaching at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Government.

The co-author of Helping Students Navigate the Path to College: What High Schools Can Do, a publication of the US Department of Education, Nicole holds a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from the University of Virginia, a Master's degree from Georgetown University, and a Bachelor's degree from the University of Notre Dame. She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina with her husband and their two children.
 Eric R. Jensen
Eric R. JensenIllinois Wesleyan University
Eric Jensen

Eric R. Jensen

Illinois Wesleyan University

Eric R. Jensen was named the 19th president of Illinois Wesleyan University on Sept. 14 and began his service to the University on Nov. 1, 2015. Prior to being named president of Illinois Wesleyan, Jensen served as provost and chief academic officer at Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minnesota from 2012 to 2015. As Hamline provost, he oversaw undergraduate and graduate programming, academic advising, student affairs, intercollegiate athletics, the libraries and the international and diversity programs. In addition, Jensen had significant budgetary responsibility, working closely with the chief financial officer in developing the university's overall budget. He also created a process to successfully deal with a significant budget shortfall that existed when he arrived at Hamline. His office funded the development of transformative, immersive courses offered variously on campus, in the Twin Cities, and abroad.

President Jensen earned both his Ph.D. and master's degrees in economics from the University of Michigan, and his undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Miami. In 1982, President Jensen began his academic career as an economics and public policy professor at William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. From 2004 to 2012, he served as director of the Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy at William & Mary.   

An active scholar and researcher, Jensen has published numerous articles on the economics of demographic change, and has worked in a number of Asian countries as a Senior Fellow for the Honolulu-based East-West Center and as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow based in Washington, D.C. He has also been a Visiting Scholar in Economics at the University of Indonesia, and has worked on World Bank and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) projects in South and Southeast Asia. The Rockefeller Foundation, the Andrew Mellon Foundation and the Freeman Foundation have also supported his scholarly activity.
 William E. Kirwan
William E. KirwanUniversity System of Maryland
William Kirwan

William E. Kirwan

University System of Maryland

Dr. William Kirwan, is a nationally recognized authority on critical issues shaping the higher education landscape.

Prior to his 13 years as chancellor of the University System of Maryland, Kirwan served as president of Ohio State University for four years and president of the University of Maryland, College Park for 10 years. He was also a member of the University of Maryland faculty for 24 years.

A respected academic leader, Kirwan is a sought-after speaker on a wide range of topics, including access and affordability, cost containment, diversity, innovation, higher education's role in economic development, and academic transformation. Along with his national and international presentations on key issues, he has authored many articles on issues in higher education and has been profiled and cited in academic and mainstream publications. He is co-editor of the book Advances in Complex Analysis and has published many articles on mathematical research.

Currently, Kirwan chairs the National Research Council Board of Higher Education and Workforce and co-chairs the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. He also serves on the Business-Higher Education Forum. He is a member of the boards of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, Greater Baltimore Committee, Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore, Maryland Business Roundtable for Education, and other organizations.

Kirwan received his bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Kentucky and his master's and doctoral degrees in mathematics from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

 Matthew T. Lambert
Matthew T. LambertWilliam & Mary
Matthew Lambert

Matthew T. Lambert

William & Mary

Paper Title: Privatization and the Public Good
As vice president for University Advancement, Matthew T. Lambert oversees all William & Mary efforts related to alumni engagement, private fundraising and philanthropic outreach, university marketing and alumni communications. Under Dr. Lambert's direction, University Advancement's overarching goal is to create a lasting, robust culture of engagement and philanthropy among the greater William & Mary community.

A graduate of William & Mary with a bachelor's degree in psychology and sociology, Lambert earned a master's degree from The Ohio State University, and a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to returning to William & Mary in 2013 as the vice president for university development, he was associate vice president in Georgetown University's Office of Advancement. In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate courses, he is active in public policy research and scholarship and is the author of the book Privatization and the Public Good: Public Universities in the Balance (Harvard Education Press). Lambert and his wife, Karen Silverberg Lambert '98, live in Williamsburg with their two sons, William and Harrison. Lambert is also an ex-officio trustee of The College of William & Mary Foundation.
 Daniel T. Madzelan
Daniel T. MadzelanAmerican Council on Education
David T. Madzelan

Daniel T. Madzelan

American Council on Education

Daniel T. Madzelan joined ACE in 2014 as associate vice president for Government Relations. In his role, Madzelan helps advance ACE's advocacy on behalf of the higher education community, particularly the array of federal policies and issues critical to the missions of American colleges and universities and the students they serve.

From 2009–10, Madzelan served as acting assistant secretary for postsecondary education at the U.S. Department of Education, where he was charged with primary responsibility for administering a $2.6 billion program budget providing financial support to colleges and universities and their students, and had policy and program budget responsibility for the Title IV student financial aid programs that provided nearly $130 billion in grant, loan and work-study assistance to more than 14 million postsecondary students and their families. Previously, he was a longtime director of the forecasting and policy analysis service in the department's office of postsecondary education. He worked in a number of capacities in that office before becoming a director.

Madzelan is a graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park, with a bachelor of arts in economics with a concentration in mathematics and statistics.
 Peter McHenry
Peter McHenryWilliam & Mary
Peter McHenry

Peter McHenry

William & Mary

Peter McHenry is Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy at William & Mary. He is a labor economist with a B.S. from Vanderbilt University and a Ph.D. from Yale University.  McHenry's research connects labor markets with the locations where they operate. His published work includes articles about household migration behavior, the influence of location choices on racial and ethnic wage gaps, and the responses of native-born youth to local immigration flows.

McHenry has also studied higher education institutions. With coauthors, he has criticized how colleges tout their local economic impacts and has estimated the relationship between the United States college attendance rate and the average preparedness of college attendees. In addition to his scholarly work, McHenry is a frequent media commentator on labor economics issues.

 Michael S. McPherson
Michael S. McPhersonSpencer Foundation
Michael McPherson

Michael S. McPherson

Spencer Foundation

Paper Title: "The Promise and the Hazards of New Educational Technologies"

Michael S. McPherson is the fifth President of the Spencer Foundation. Prior to joining the Foundation in 2003 he served as President of Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota for seven years. A nationally known economist whose expertise focuses on the interplay between education and economics, McPherson spent the 22 years prior to his Macalester presidency as professor of economics, chairman of the Economics Department, and dean of faculty at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. He holds a B.A. in Mathematics, an M.A. in Economics, and a Ph.D. in Economics, all from the University of Chicago.

McPherson, who is co-author and editor of several books, including Lesson Plan: An Agenda for Change in American Higher Education, Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America's Public Universities; College Access: Opportunity or Privilege?; Keeping College Affordable; Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy, and Public Policy; and was founding co-editor of the journal Economics and Philosophy. He has served as a trustee of the College Board, the American Council on Education, Wesleyan University, and the DentaQuest Foundation. He was a Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study and a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He is currently a trustee of McNally Smith College of Music and President of the Board of Overseers of TIAA-CREF.

 W. Taylor Reveley, III
W. Taylor Reveley, IIIWilliam & Mary
Taylor Reveley

W. Taylor Reveley, III

William & Mary

Taylor Reveley was sworn in as the 27th president of William & Mary on September 5, 2008, after serving as interim president since February 2008. Before assuming his current post, he served as dean of William & Mary Law School for almost a decade, starting in August 1998. He is the John Stewart Bryan Professor of Jurisprudence. Before joining William & Mary, Reveley practiced law for many years at Hunton & Williams, where he specialized in energy matters, especially those involving commercial nuclear power. He was the managing partner of the firm for nine years.

Reveley received his A.B. from Princeton University in 1965. At Princeton, he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and rowed on the lightweight crew for two years. Reveley went to law school at the University of Virginia, receiving his J.D. in 1968. During the United States Supreme Court's 1969 term, he clerked for Justice William J. Brennan, Jr.

Reveley has extensively studied and written about the constitutional division of the war powers between the President and Congress. In 1972-73, he spent 13 months studying the war powers while an International Affairs Fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City and a Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. He is the author of War Powers of the President and Congress: Who Holds the Arrows and Olive Branch? (University of Virginia Press, 1981).
 Richard M. Romano
Richard M. RomanoSUNY Broome Community College
Richard Romano

Richard M. Romano

SUNY Broome Community College

Richard M. Romano is Professor Emeritus of economics at SUNY Broome Community College/State University of New York and Director of the Institute for Community College Research. He is also an Affiliated Faculty member at the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute at Cornell University. Having served as a faculty member/administrator at the community college level for over 40 years, he also has been a visiting professor/scholar at UCLA (1983), the State University of New York at Binghamton (1986), the New School (1995), North Carolina State University (2002) and the University of South Florida (2008).

In 2003 he received the Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities, the highest award given for research by the State University of New York. More recently he has received the Senior Scholar Award (2013) from the Council for the Study of Community Colleges. He has a B.A. degree in economics from St. Lawrence University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from the State University of New York at Binghamton. His current research is in the area of higher education finance. Most recent publications are: Financing Community Colleges: Where we are, Where we're going (with Jim Palmer) (2016) Rowman & Littlefield; The Community College and the Business Cycle, Change Magazine (Sept/Oct, 2016).

 Melvyn D. Schiavelli
Melvyn D. SchiavelliNorthern Virginia Community College
Melvyn Schiavelli

Melvyn D. Schiavelli

Northern Virginia Community College

Melvyn D. Schiavelli, executive vice president, provides administrative and operational oversight of the College, serving as the chief assistant to the president in implementing and executing policy decisions. The executive vice president has overall responsibility for Academic and Student Services -- promoting the systematic enhancement of the academic mission and functional operation of a single college with programs and services delivered on multiple campuses in response to the needs and aspirations of the dynamic metropolitan region of Northern Virginia. More specifically, the Executive Vice President provides college-wide leadership for all instructional, curricular and personnel issues related to academic affairs, student services and academic support programs of the College.

The Office of Executive Vice President includes the units of Academic Services, Grants Development and Special Projects, Student Services & Enrollment Management, Student Financial Aid & Support Services and Global Studies & Programs. These units provide collaborative leadership, policy guidance and operational coordination for a variety of activities and resources that support the effective delivery and continuing enhancement of instructional programs and services to students on the multiple campuses of the College.

Mel Schiavelli was Provost of William & Mary from 1986 - 1993. He was Assistant Professor of Chemistry from 1968-1971, Associate Professor of Chemistry from 1971-1980, full Professor from 1980-1993, chair of the Chemistry department from 1978-1984 and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences from 1984-1986. After President Verkuil retired from his position in 1992, Schiavelli served as acting president until President Timothy Sullivan's tenure began later that year.

 Sarah Turner
Sarah TurnerUniversity of Virginia
Sarah Turner

Sarah Turner

University of Virginia

Paper Title: What Low-income Students Know About College

Sarah Turner is University Professor of Economics and Education at the University of Virginia and a Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research. Turner's research focuses on both the supply and demand sides of the education market and the link with the labor market, with particular attention to how public policies affect outcomes. Recent research projects include the "Aid and Application Awareness" survey of how high school seniors and their parents perceive the costs of different collegiate options, expectations about the likelihood of admission, general knowledge of financial aid, and sources of guidance and information in the college application process.

Turner’s research also examines scientific labor markets and the internationalization of doctorate education with a focus on understanding the distribution of students by country of origin and program quality at U.S. institutions, the domestic and home- country factors affecting the persistence of foreign-born Ph.D.s in the U.S. labor market, and how the influx of foreign Ph.D.s affects wages and future decisions to enter science and engineering fields. Turner received her B.A. from Princeton University and her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

 Douglas Webber
Douglas WebberTemple University
Douglas Webber

Douglas Webber

Temple University

Paper Title: "Evaluating the Costs and Benefits of a Federal Risk-Sharing Policy"

Douglas Webber is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Temple University and a Research Fellow at the Institute for Labor Economics. He has published on a wide variety of topics in the fields of labor economics and the economics of higher education, including: earnings inequality, expenditures in higher education, the gender pay gap, the economic returns to college major, and student loan debt. His research has appeared in scholarly journals such as Labour Economics, Industrial Relations, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and the Economics of Education Review, as well as popular press outlets such as the Chronicle of Higher Education and Fivethirtyeight. He has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions on the topic of student loan policy and higher education finance.

Prior to joining Temple University, Dr. Webber worked as an economist at the Center for Economic Studies at the U.S. Census Bureau. Dr. Webber holds Bachelor's degrees in Economics and Mathematics from the University of Florida, as well as Masters and Ph.D. degrees in Economics from Cornell University.