Frequently Asked Questions

President Taylor Reveley formed the Task Force on Race and Relations in March 2015 and charged the group with conducting an extensive review of four areas: campus climate, prevention and education, recruitment of diverse faculty and senior administration, and bias reporting and incident protocol.

The 21-member task force included faculty, staff and administrators (several of whom are also alumni), students and a member of the Board of Visitors, began meeting monthly starting in March 2015 and focused on four tasks: discussing current programs and practices at William & Mary, hosting six on-campus forums on racial climate, reading and discussing feedback from the community received on the task force's website and examining events related to race and race relations across the country both on university campuses and beyond.

The task force submitted their final report to President Reveley in March 2016.

What is the plan now that the Task Force has finished their work?
Will President Reveley act on the other recommendations?
How will W&M use the $1-million pool for recruiting faculty?
Who will be in charge of these funds?
How will you use the $100,000 budgeted for the Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity?
What led to the decision to rename the two Jamestown Residence Halls?
Why name two buildings for Lemon and Hardy?
What does this mean to the current effort underway related to memorializing enslaved people who were part of W&M’s history?
How does W&M plan to deal with the concerns raised by staff?
How can I get additional information on the climate survey?
Who should I contact with additional questions or comments about the work of the task force?

What is the plan now that the Task Force has finished their work?

The president announced several immediate actions in his April 20 message to the campus community. This includes budgets actions (including a $1.1 million commitment) to support and enhance diversity and inclusion at W&M, the naming of two prominent buildings to more fully reflect the university's African American history, and the formation of a committee charged with reviewing all recommendations and developing a plan for further actions.

Will President Reveley act on the other recommendations?

In total, the task force submitted 51 recommendations, which all deserve adequate thought and review. A soon-to-be-named implementation committee will begin its work as soon as possible, and review what actions are possible in the near term, what are long-terms goals for the university and which recommendations need further analysis or modification. 

How will W&M use the $1-million pool for recruiting faculty?

As announced by President Reveley, W&M will launch a $1-million initiative "to recruit new faculty to increase W&M's diversity." This year’s budget proposal includes $500,000 toward this effort and we will recommend another $500,000 in academic year 2017-18 for an annual recurring commitment of $1 million.

Who will be in charge of these funds?

The details are still being developed but the Provost will be responsible for the faculty pool.

How will you use the $100,000 budgeted for the Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity?

The money budgeted for the Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity will be used to expand staffing and increase the operating and programming budget.

What led to the decision to rename the two Jamestown Residence Halls?

The "Jamestown Residences" name was always meant as a placeholder when the buildings opened in 2006. The name refers to Jamestown Road, which borders the residence halls.

Over the past year, it became clear that William & Mary needed to do something to honor individuals who more fully reflect the diversity of our university and also acknowledge our history and past. After conversations with members of the Task Force, university leadership and others within the university family, President Reveley will propose this week that the Board of Visitors name two prominent buildings on campus in honor of African Americans important to W&M's past.

Why name two buildings for Lemon and Hardy?

Lemon Hall would be named after an enslaved man owned by William & Mary in the late 18th century. He is also the man for whom we named the Lemon Project, a university initiative launched by the Board of Visitors in 2009 to explore William & Mary's historic role in perpetuating slavery and racial discrimination, and William & Mary's current role in fostering reconciliation and overcoming the legacy of that past. While very little is known about Lemon himself, his name represents an effort that has become a model for other universities looking to study, acknowledge and learn from their past history. "In many ways, Lemon stands in the place of the known and unknown African Americans who helped to build, maintain, and move the College forward," the project states on its website.

Hardy Hall would be named after the late Carroll Hardy, the longtime administrator in student affairs who was affectionately known on campus as "Dean Hardy." Hardy joined W&M in 1980 as Associate Dean of Multicultural Affairs, and served in several different capacities, including Associate Dean of Students for Minority and Commuting Student Affairs and Associate Dean of Student Affairs. Among her many accomplishments at W&M and beyond was the establishment of the National Black Student Leadership Development Conference for college students across the country. She also founded the Hulon Willis Association for African-American students and alumni, worked to increase diversity of W&M's student body through six summer enrichment programs for students in grades 8 to 12, and helped create and support 15 multicultural student organizations at William & Mary. Hardy, who received honorary alumna status at W&M, passed away in 2012.

While both represent very different time periods of the university’s history, in many ways Lemon and Carroll Hardy serve as bookends and important reminders of African American history at William & Mary.

What does this mean to the current effort underway related to memorializing enslaved people who were part of W&M’s history?

That work will continue and is ongoing. The renaming of the residence halls would be an immediate action but the newly formed Committee on Diversity and Inclusion will work directly with the Lemon Project to recommend other ways in which enslaved people who were part of W&M's history could be memorialized on our campus.

How does W&M plan to deal with the concerns raised by staff?

In the fall of 2015, the Office of Human Resources partnered with the task force to conduct a climate survey of faculty and staff. The task force's report, as well as results of the climate survey, made it clear the university has work to improve campus climate for our African American employees, especially non-exempt classified African American employees in Facilities Management.

As noted in the president's message, one of the immediate actions will be working with an outside vendor to lead focus groups and better examine concerns and issues raised by staff, including staff within Facilities Management. The outside vendor will be selected over the summer and they will be working with staff by fall 2016.

In addition, the Office of Human Resources is implementing a series of immediate actions in response to the recent employee climate survey. These include focusing on areas of improving performance management, providing more extensive support for employees, improving recruitment when it comes to attracting and retaining a diverse group of employees, and developing better mechanisms for employees to provide consistent and candid feedback.

How can I get additional information on the climate survey?

Results of the employee climate survey (including final report, executive summary and a separate FAQ) were released earlier this semester on the HR website.

Who should I contact with additional questions or comments about the work of the task force?

Feedback can be submitted through the response form on task force website, or by contacting the chair, Chon Glover, at [[wfglov]].