Exhibit Photos

 

image of exhibit item Certificate of Pilgrimage signed by Joseph Ndiaye

 

image of exhibit item “Cape Coast Castle, a former ‘slave factory’ in the central coastal region of Ghana, symbolizes a break or tear with the African past. ‘Sites of memory’ like this one problematize and complicate our understanding of what it means to be African American.”

 

image of exhibit item “...[M]emory crystallizes and secretes itself at a particular historical moment, a turning point where consciousness of a break with the past is bound up with the sense that memory has ben torn -- but torn in such a way as to pose the problem of the embodiment of memory in certain sites where a sense of historical continuity persists.” 
--Pierre Nora, Les Lieux de Memoire

 

image of exhibit item “At Elmina, a giant compass rose, built by the Dutch to true the compasses on their ships...”

 

image of exhibit item “The governor then came and stood at his balcony carefully looking through and then making his choice. The one selected was washed down by the soldiers and after that she was escorted to the governor’s bedroom.” 
--Komla Pajibo, The Realities About Elmina

 

image of exhibit item “For the Lord hath chosen Zion; he hath desired it for his habitation.” 
--Psalm 132:14 
Old Dutch Chapel at Elmina, built above women’s dungeon.

 

image of exhibit item Women’s Dungeon 
Elmina

 

image of exhibit item “At Elmina Castle slave factory, women who refused to comply with the slaver’s sexual demands were left chained to these balls of iron in the tropical sun of the castle courtyard.”

 

image of exhibit item “Here at Elmina Castle, aslo known as St. Goerge’s Castle, free Africans who refused to be made into slaves were forced into the cell on the left without food or water, as many as four at a time. The door remained firmly locked until all were dead. In the interim, the dead and the living lay horribly intertwined.”

 

image of exhibit item “Cape Coast Castle, a former ‘slave factory’ in the central coastal region of Ghana, symbolizes a break or tear with the African past. ‘Sites of memory’ like this one problematize and complicate our understanding of what it means to be an African American.”

 

image of exhibit item “...the blood that binds us is deeper than the water that divides us!” 
-- Crossing A Deep River

 

image of exhibit item Gorée Island Slave House 
Maison des Esclaves

 

image of exhibit item Joseph Ndiaye, Chief Curator 
Maison des Esclaves 
Gorée Island, Senegal

 

image of exhibit item “Mariétou Ndago, tour guide and sovereing spirit, teaching in French, English and Wolof at Gorée, touching the fracture, the tear that we come to repair...” 
Maison des Esclaves 
6 July 1998

 

image of exhibit item “‘Innocent babe, for from the smile and the tears of your mother!’” 
Children’s Dungeon, Maison des Esclaves

 

image of exhibit item “The mother might go to America, the father to Brazil, the children to the Antilles, Separation was irrevocable.” 
--Joseph Ndiyae, Curator 
Maison des Esclaves 
Gorée Island, Senegal

 

image of exhibit item “Gorée reminds us of the hummiliation which man inflicted on his neighbor. We will never forget. Forgive, not forget.” 
--Abdou Diouf, President of Senegal 
April 2, 1998

 

image of exhibit item “The future of a people can only be illuminated when founded on the past.” 
--Joseph Ndiaye, Curator 
Maison des Esclaves, Gorée

 

image of exhibit item “Comme nous sommes le même peuple, je peux vias le dire...” --Joseph Ndiaye, Chief Curator 
Maison des Esclaves

 

image of exhibit item “The long journey of African Americans prove that the spirit can never be enslaved.” 
--U.S. President William Jefferson Clinton
Gorée, 3 April 1998

 

image of exhibit item “It was called the DOOR OF DEATH... NO ONE who crossed over that threshold was ever heard from again!”

 

image of exhibit item “The sea took us away, the sea will bring us back.” 
-- African Proverb
Gorée Island Ferry

 

image of exhibit item “Come, let us dance this ring shout of reconciliation and renewal! I invite you! I beg you. Come!” 
--Crossing A Deep River

 

image of exhibit item “Black virgin, braided angel, pray for us now...” 
Dakar, Senegal