Student-Faculty Research

Faraz Rahman (left) and Jasmin Green, known collectively as “Jafar” look over the open water of Lake Matoaka with Kurt.
Going viral

Lake Matoaka has a thriving and diverse population of viruses living in its waters. And that’s good.

Mathew Wawersik
One of a thousand

You have to look pretty closely to find Matthew Wawersik's name on this paper. The list of authors and their affiliations goes on for most of four pages.

Catherine Wise ’15 discusses progress on her nickel catalyst with Assistant Professor of Chemistry William McNamara
Taking a leaf from nature

William & Mary chemist William McNamara is taking a “bio-inspired” approach to the world’s energy crisis by turning to nature’s very own chemical power plant: photosynthesis.

Mary Seward, a graduate student in biology
High anxiety

A team of biologists at William & Mary has begun a long-term experiment to determine what is behind the degradation of the College Woods ecosystem.

Lessons from Polynesia

Environmental change is nothing new in Polynesia. For centuries, the inhabitants of the volcanic, sea-battered islands have been employing a variety of strategies to adapt to their changing landscapes.

students working at the Bray School dig site
Digging for a smoking lunchbox

Archaeologists have a month to find the smoking lunchbox of the Bray School, and Terry Meyers has lost none of his optimism.

Apps in the Cloud

Mike Panciera had already helped a blind man navigate the perilous fantasy worlds of video games. It made sense that the next step would be to design a mobile app to help the blind find their way through the interiors of real buildings.

At TribeHacks

H. Wade Minter, the chief technology officer at a company that provides web and mobile services to five million users, stood in Swem Library, looked out upon the frantic final minutes of William & Mary’s first 24-hour hackathon and talked about the influence of the liberal arts on computer science.

Shorebird central

It is dawn near the mouth of the Pacora River in Panama and the shorebirds are beginning to break from their night roost on an offshore bar. They move out over the water in dozens of flocks, merging and splitting, folding and undulating, to make abstract sculptures between water and sky.

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