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Notes & Curiosities

An 18th-century brewery?

All signs indicate that a brew house once stood in the shadow of the Wren Building, but those inclined to toast the rediscovery of a facility that slaked thirsts at William & Mary 300 years ago should really wait until the lab results are in.

Le Mangeur de Bleuets

Over the songs of Swainson’s thrush and white-throated sparrows come the soothing calls of approaching whimbrels. Soon 24 birds in formation appear over the tree line and begin a wide circle over the blueberry field.

At TribeHacks

H. Wade Minter, the chief technology officer at a company that provides web and mobile services to five million users, stood in Swem Library, looked out upon the frantic final minutes of William & Mary’s first 24-hour hackathon and talked about the influence of the liberal arts on computer science.

Ellen Stofan
It takes a field geologist

Listening to Ellen Stofan talk to a room full of geologists is like being in on a brainstorming session for a new science fiction movie.

Be there…or be 1/r²

The hyper-rational world of science has always made a bit of room to accommodate legend and William & Mary will soon be home to a living piece of one of the most well known scientific legends: a descendant of Isaac Newton’s apple tree.

A great blue mystery

In February, the great blue herons of the Chesapeake Bay region will begin their nest building or repair chores and their mating rituals—perhaps in a tree they’ve been sharing with bald eagles.

Geology major Kat Turk ’16 and William & Mary paleontologist Rowan Lockwood
Un-beached whale

Cornwallis sank as he died, making a couple of revolutions on his way down, finally ending belly up and flippers akimbo, making a sort of “whale angel” on the ocean bottom.

Math major Robert Torrence shows off his digital “New York Times” version of the classic Lights Out puzzle.
A bigger, harder ‘Lights Out’

William & Mary math student Robert Torrence is shedding some light on a decades-old game that continues to puzzle thousands each year.

Lionfish

Diving in the Florida Keys at the age of 15, Erin Spencer caught a glimpse of a beautiful fish.