Fall 2011


Almost like magic

All actions in nature can be expressed numerically. That’s biomathematics in a very, very small nutshell. Kiah Hardcastle has her own way to describe the concept.

Digging up our roots

A piece of stone and a scant double-handful of broken glass. It doesn’t look like much to the uninitiated, but the team of archaeologists working this summer at the base of the Brafferton knows that these artifacts are the richest kind of pay dirt.

Untying the Knot

For the faithful of every creed, the beginning of marriage is a religious and spiritual event. But what about when the marriage ends?

The chemist and the conservator

Shelley Svoboda uses a fine surgical blade to take pigment samples from 18th-century paintings.

Triumph of kawaii

She’s an internationally acclaimed superstar who accessorizes with a colorful bow clipped near her left ear. Her image appears on more than 10,000 items.

Translating devotion

The Bhagavata Purana is to some Hindus what the Bible is to some Christians. It is a work of literature encompassing a rich tradition of poetry and drama, as well as a scientific, technical, philosophical and Hindu religious text.

Teaching through research

"We’ve determined as a faculty that our undergraduate students should comprehend the tools of research as an essential part of their future problem-solving and decision-making,” says Joel Schwartz, director of the Charles Center and dean of honors and interdisciplinary studies.

The chicks go wild

Virginia’s breeding population of red-cockaded woodpeckers reached a new high this year, with nine breeding pairs documented in late May.

Economic déjà vu

Scott Nelson’s forthcoming book looks at strangely familiar financial landscapes. Junk bonds and unbacked, ineptly bundled mortgages trigger financial crises that prompt competing economic stimulus proposals in Washington, D.C.

Next stop: oblivion

Sometimes you want to prevent extinction. In other cases, you want to hurry extinction along.

Lisa Landino
Warrior against Alzheimer’s

Lisa Landino studies the chemistry behind what she calls “the big three” neurodegenerative diseases: Parkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer’s.

Headed for dark matter

Reinard Primulando, a Ph.D. student in the William & Mary Department of Physics, is a recipient of a Fermilab Fellowship in Theoretical Physics.

Who owns this meteorite?

On Jan. 18, 2010, a meteorite fell out of the sky and into the examining room of the Williamsburg Square Family Practice in Lorton, Va.

Kirk Havens of VIMS appointed vice chair of Chesapeake panel

The Chesapeake Bay Program’s Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) has appointed Kirk Havens of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, to serve as the committee’s vice chair and chair-elect.