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Graduate students showcase their research

Wendy Korwin

Wendy Korwin:  Wendy Korwin, a graduate student in American studies, answers a question on her symposium presentation comparing the judging standards of contemporary dog shows with those of old slave markets.

William and Mary’s seventh annual Graduate Research Symposium was held March 28 and 29, 2007  at the University Center.

The following awards were won by work done by William and Mary graduate students:

Market Access International, Inc. Award for Excellence in Scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences: Erin Krutko, American Studies. Advisor: Charlie McGovern. “Public Memory and Racial Reconciliation in Little Rock”

Incogen, Inc. Award for Excellence in Scholarship in the Natural and Computational Sciences: Ningfang Mi, Computer Science. Advisor: Evgenia Smirni. “Performance Impacts of Autocorrelated Flows in Multi-tiered Systems”

Award for Excellence in Scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences: Wendy Korwin, American Studies. Advisor: Leisa Meyer. “Spectacles of Breeding: Kinship and the American Dog Show”
Honorable Mentions:
Natalie Brito, Psychology. Advisor: Peter Vishton. “Influences of Motor System State on Ebbinghaus Illusion Magnitude” and Shereen Singer, Psychology. Advisor: Jennifer Stevens. “The Power of Imagery: Using Mental Imagery to Reduce Food Cravings”

Award for Excellence in Scholarship in the Natural and Computational Sciences: Jonathan Holley, Biology. Advisor: Randolph M. Chambers. “Water Quality in Headwater Streams: A Test of Best Management Practices”
Honorable Mentions: Mary Levillain, Psychology. Advisor: Pamela S. Hunt. “Can Nicotine Ameliorate Memory Deficits Found in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?” and Meghan Revelle, Computer Science. Advisor: David Coppit. “How To Find a Needle in a Digital Haystack”

Posters representing the work of graduate students were displayed in the University Center lobby throughout the symposium and a number of graduate students gave 15-minute oral presentations in the various rooms of the University Center.

The keynote address was delivered by former diplomat Mitchell Reiss, vice provost for international affairs at William and Mary. Titled “Bridging the Gap: From the Ivory Tower to the Corridors of Power,” Reiss addressed how the skills and lessons accumulated during graduate studies can benefit leaders beyond campus in the diplomatic, political and business worlds.

The Graduate Research Symposium was hosted by William & Mary’s Graduate Student Association of Arts & Sciences and the College of Arts & Sciences’ Office of Graduate Studies and Research.   i