Bios of Speakers, Panelists and Rapporteurs

Marty Abbott,  Executive Director, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

Laura Adams, Director, Program on Central Asia and the Caucasus, Harvard University

Ricardo Alencar, Deputy Associate Vice-President for Academic Affairs, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janiero, Brazil

Juliette S. Apkarian, Associate Professor, Russian Studies, Department of Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures, Emory University

Mark Ballam, Managing Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, San Diego State University

Gary Bauleke, Director, Capabilities and Foreign Area Officer Policy in the Defense Language and National Security Education Office

Kirk Belnap, Director, National Middle East Language Resource Center, Brigham Young University

Sigrid Berka, Executive Director, International Engineering Program, University of Rhode Island

Anne Betteridge, Director, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of Arizona

Alice Blayne-Allard, Associate Vice President, International Programs and Services, American Association of Community Colleges

Gwendolyn M. Bookman, Director, Center for Global Studies and External Partnerships and Associate Professor of Political Science, Bennett College for Women

Richard D. Brecht, Co-Director, American Councils Education Research Center, and Director, Language Policy Initiatives, University of Maryland

Thomas R. Bruce, Director, Legal Information Institute, Cornell Law School

William Brustein, Vice Provost for Global Strategies and International Affairs, Ohio State University

Colin Campbell, President, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Rahim Charania, Chief Executive Officer, American Fueling Systems

Monica Clark, Council on American Overseas Research Centers

Gary L. Clinton, Advisor, University of North Carolina Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) and Global Business Projects Citigroup Inc., Managing Director (ret) 

Shirley Daniel, Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

Dan Davidson, President, American Councils for International Education

Jacques deLisle, Director, Center for East Asian Studies and Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania

Richard Drobnick,  Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

Rosemary Feal, Executive Director, Modern Language Association

Thomas Fingar, Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University, Former Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Analysis and Chairman of the National Intelligence Council

Trevellya Ford-Ahmed, Professor of Communications and former Director of International Programs, West Virginia State University

Margo Glew, Director, Global Educators Cohort Program, Department of Teacher Education, College of Education, Michigan State University

John Grandin, Professor Emeritus of German and Executive Director Emeritus, International Engineering Program, University of Rhode Island

Charles R. Hale, Director, Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies and Benson Collection, University of Texas at Austin

Stephen E. Hanson, Vice Provost for International Affairs and Director of the Reves Center for International Studies, College of William & Mary

Caitlin Haugen, Executive Director, Global Teacher Education

Dan Hazen, Associate Librarian of Harvard College for Collection Development

Jon Huntsman Jr., U.S. Ambassador to China (2009-2011) and Governor of Utah (2005-2009)

Tony Jackson, Vice President for Education, Asia Society

Deborah Jakubs, Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs, Duke University

Linda Jorn, Associate Vice Provost for Learning Technologies and DoIT Director of Academic Technology, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Olga Kagan, Director, National Heritage Language Resource Center, UCLA

Hilary Kahn, Director, Center for the Study of Global Change, Indiana University

Anthony Kane, Senior Manager, China Programs, American Councils for International Education; Former Director, Hopkins-Nanjing Center

Miriam Kazanjian, Independent Consultant, Coalition for International Education

Ben Kedia, Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, University of Memphis

Robert O. Keohane, Professor of International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

Gail Kligman, Director, Center for European and Eurasian Studies, UCLA

Helena Kolenda, Program Director for Asia, Henry Luce Foundation

Stacy Korbelak, Assistant Professor of English and Coordinator, Global Distinction Program, Howard Community College

Kurt Kuehn, Chief Financial Officer, United Parcel Service

Charles Kurzman,  Professor of Sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jerry Lampe, Independent Consultant and Senior Academic Advisor, Arabic Flagship Programs, American Councils for International Education

Jeffrey W. Legro, Vice Provost for Global Affairs, University of Virginia

Jamie Leite, Director, Portuguese Dual Language Immersion, Utah State Office of Education

Constance Malpas, Program Officer, OCLC Research

Jennifer Manise, Executive Director, Longview Foundation

Gail McGinn, Independent Consultant,  Former Deputy Undersecretary for Planning, Office of the Under Secretary for Personnel and Readiness, U.S. Department of Defense

Scott McGinnis, Defense Language Institute

Paul McVeigh, Associate Vice President, Global Studies and Programs, Northern Virginia Community College

Gilbert Merkx, Director of International and Area Studies, Duke University

David Obey, U.S. Representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District from 1969 to 2011, former Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee and Senior Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service (WIPPS)

Matthew Ouimet, Director of Russia and Eurasia, Bureau of Intelligence and Research, U.S. Department of State

Lynda Park, Executive Director, Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Roy Paulson, President, Paulson Manufacturing Corporation; Member, President's Export Council, Subcommittee Export Administration; Chair, National District Export Council

Paul Primak, Director (retired), International Programs & International Internships, Oregon University System

James A. Pritchett, President of the African Studies Association, and Professor of Anthropology, Michigan State University

Peter D. Quella, Assistant Director, African Studies Center, Boston University

Thomas F. Reese, Executive Director, Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University

W. Taylor Reveley III, President, College of William & Mary

Mark Rosenberg, President, Florida International University

Heidi Ross, Director, Center for East Asian Studies, Indiana University

Nancy Ruther, Associate Director, The MacMillan Center, Yale University

Wolfgang Schlör, Associate Provost, Western Michigan University

Silke Scholz,  Product Specialist, Hexagon Metrology, Inc.

Susan Sutton, Senior Advisor for Internationalization, Bryn Mawr College

Julie Sykes, Director, Center for Applied Second Language Studies, University of Oregon

Michael Tierney, Director, Institute for the Theory and Practice of International Relations, College of William & Mary

Sara West Tully, Executive Director, Center for International Education, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

Brian Whalen, President and CEO, The Forum on Education Abroad

Margaret Wiedenhoeft, Associate Director of International Programs, Kalamazoo College

Cynthia Williams, Director of External Relations, Division of International Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Anand Yang, Director, Center for South Asian Studies, University of Washington

Suzanne H. Young, Associate Director for Language, Education & Research, Center for Language Study, Yale University

Marty Abbott,  Executive Director, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

Marty Abbott is currently the Executive Director for the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Her career began in Fairfax County Public Schools (VA) where she was a language teacher, foreign language coordinator, and Director of High School Instruction.  She has served on national committees to develop student standards, beginning teacher standards, and performance assessments in foreign languages.  She was President of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in 2003. She holds her B.A. degree in Spanish with a minor in Latin from the University of Mary Washington and a Master’s Degree in Spanish Linguistics from Georgetown University.

Laura Adams, Director, Program on Central Asia and the Caucasus, Harvard University

Laura Adams has been studying culture and national identity in the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Central Asia since 1988. Her research has covered topics ranging from the interactions between globalization and the nation-state in the context of the visual and performing arts, state-society relations in Central Asia, research methods for measuring identity, and comparing sovereignty after empire in the Middle East and Central Asia. She is Director of the Program on Central Asia and the Caucasus and Academic Advisor to the M.A. program in Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies at Harvard University, and she also teaches in the sociology department at Georgetown University. She has served as President of the Central Eurasian Studies Society and has led several projects in international higher education research and development. Laura received her B.A. in sociology and Russian area studies from Macalester College (USA) and her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Ricardo Alencar, Deputy Associate Vice-President for Academic Affairs, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janiero, Brazil

PhD in Linguistics and Portuguese Language, Adjunct Professor of Portuguese Language and Linguistics – Department of Letters, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), working as a Teacher of Portuguese as a Second Language to International Students (since 1996) and Teacher of Teaching Practice and Methodology in the specialization course (Graduate Diploma level) Portuguese as a Second Language Teachers Training Course. The research line developed is Intercultural Aspects of Portuguese as a Second Language with several articles and chapters of books and academics journals published, presentations and lectures in national and international conferences. Academic Coordinator of Portuguese as a Second Language for Extension Courses. Former First Secretary of the International Society of Portuguese as a Second Language – SIPLE (1998-2001). Deputy Associate Vice-President for Academic Affairs, International Office, PUC-Rio (since 2009).

Juliette S. Apkarian, Associate Professor, Russian Studies, Department of Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures, Emory University

Juliette Stapanian Apkarian is an Associate Professor at Emory University, where she long served as Chair of the Department of Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures.  She also directed Emory’s program in Russian and East European Studies, formerly a Title VI-Undergraduate National Resource Center (with FLAS).  Her experience includes projects funded by the Academy of Korean Studies and Chinese Hanban; and initiatives with Kansai University (Japan), CNN, High Museum, Carter Center, and Martin Luther King Center.  She has been a board member of the Georgia Fulbright Association, field reader for diverse grants and journals, and an officer of AATSEEL.  Her publications include Mayakovsky’s Cubo-Futurist Vision, a Freedley Award book nominee.  Support from Fulbright-Hays, IREX, and NEH facilitated her scholarship.

Mark Ballam, Managing Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, San Diego State University

Mark J. Ballam serves as managing director for San Diego State University’s Center for International Business Education and Research (SDSU CIBER), a national center of excellence.  He is responsible for the overall strategy and implementation of the Center and oversees administration and management including budget, resources, advocacy, and communications programs. Also, he directs the Center’s research, training and outreach initiatives.  SDSU CIBER supports the International Business program at San Diego State University. Mr. Ballam came to San Diego State University in 2005, after eight years as associate director of the Georgia Tech CIBER. Currently, Mr. Ballam serves on the boards of the San Diego World Trade Center, Southwestern College Small Business Development & International Trade Center, and San Diego’s District Export Council.  He is a member of the Academy of International Business, and a member of Phi Beta Delta, the honor society for international scholars.

Kirk Belnap, Director, Middle East Language Resource Center, Brigham Young University

Dr. R. Kirk Belnap holds a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania and is a professor of Arabic in the Department of Asian and Near Eastern Languages at Brigham Young University, where he has been since 1988. Previous professional service includes six years as executive director of the American Association of Teachers of Arabic and then six years as editor of its journal, Al-‘Arabiyya. His research interests include second language acquisition, language policy and planning, the history of Arabic, and L1 and L2 literacy. With co-P.I. Robert Blake (U.C.-Davis), he oversaw completion of the award-winning Arabic Without Walls, a hybrid asynchronous distance-learning introductory Arabic course funded by FIPSE. He has since worked with BYU Independent Study to develop a high school version. Every summer he directs intensive residential STARTALK Arabic camps for high school students, which include an Arabic teacher apprenticeship program.

Gary Bauleke, Director, Capabilities and Foreign Area Officer Policy in the Defense Language and National Security Education Office

Gary Bauleke is the Director for Capabilities and Foreign Area Officer Policy in the Defense Language and National Security Education Office.  He is responsible for the Department of Defense Joint Foreign Area Officer Program, to include language and regional skill sustainment ; the biennial Capability-Based Review of national-level policy and strategy to generate the Department of Defense Strategic Language List; and the Capabilities-Based Requirement Identification Process through which U.S. Combatant Commands report language, regional expertise, and cultural needs.  His team tracks all language-capable personnel within the Department with the Language Readiness Index and leads the initiative to assess and track personal regional proficiency.  He is a retired Army Eurasian Foreign Area Officer with 12 years of overseas assignments.

Kirk Belnap, Director, National Middle East Language Resource Center, Brigham Young University

Dr. R. Kirk Belnap holds a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania and is a professor of Arabic in the Department of Asian and Near Eastern Languages at Brigham Young University, where he has been since 1988. Previous professional service includes six years as executive director of the American Association of Teachers of Arabic and then six years as editor of its journal, Al-‘Arabiyya. His research interests include second language acquisition, language policy and planning, the history of Arabic, and L1 and L2 literacy. With co-P.I. Robert Blake (U.C.-Davis), he oversaw completion of the award-winning Arabic Without Walls, a hybrid asynchronous distance-learning introductory Arabic course funded by FIPSE. He has since worked with BYU Independent Study to develop a high school version. Every summer he directs intensive residential STARTALK Arabic camps for high school students, which include an Arabic teacher apprenticeship program.

Sigrid Berka, Executive Director, International Engineering Program, University of Rhode Island

Dr. Sigrid Berka is the Executive Director of the International Engineering Program (IEP) at the University of Rhode Island, and also the Director of the German and the Chinese IEP, responsible for building academic programs with exchange partners abroad, internship placements for IEP’s dual degree students, corporate relations and fundraising for the IEP. Under Sigrid’s leadership, the IEP received NAFSA’s Senator Paul Simon Spotlight Award for innovative campus internationalization (2011), and the Andrew Heiskell Award for an innovative study abroad program (2012) by the Institute for International Education. She was Co-PI of the winning grant proposal (PI Megan Echevarría) chosen as one of four to launch President Obama’s 100,000 Strong Initiative in the Americas (2014). Sigrid serves as Co-Editor, with Damon Rarick, of the Online Journal for Global Engineering Education (OJGEE) as well as on the Provost’s Global Education Steering Committee.  Sigrid held prior positions as Managing Director of the MIT Germany Program and as Assistant Professor of German Studies at Barnard College. She has published a book, a textbook, numerous articles on 19th and 20th German Literature, and more recently on International Engineering Education.

Anne Betteridge, Director, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of Arizona

An anthropologist with a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, Anne H. Betteridge is Director of the University of Arizona Center for Middle Eastern Studies and a faculty member in the UA School of Middle Eastern & North African Studies.  She served as Executive Director of the Middle East Studies Association of North America (MESA) from 1990-2002.  Her research interests focus on Iranian culture, and women and ritual in particular.   She conducted fieldwork and lived in Iran from late 1974 until early 1979, and has made three visits to Iran since that time.  Anne Betteridge is currently Co-Chair of the Council of National Resource Center Directors and a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Institute for Iranian Studies.  She previously served as a member of the Executive Council of the Society for Iranian Studies; on the Board of Directors of the Association for the Study of Persianate Societies; on the Board of the American Council of Learned Societies; on the Academic Steering Committee of the Fares Center for Eastern Mediterranean Studies, Tufts University; on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Persianate Studies; and chaired the National Council of Area Studies Associations.

Alice Blayne-Allard, Associate Vice President, International Programs and Services, American Association of Community Colleges

Ms. Blayne-Allard is responsible for promoting global awareness and advancing the community college role in global education among key constituencies, nationally and internationally. Prior to joining AACC, Ms. Blayne-Allard was a foreign affairs officer with the U.S. Department of State for over ten years. She was coordinator for the U.S. in the G8-Broader Middle East and North Africa Initiative. In 2009, she was appointed to the National Security Council as Assistant Press Secretary and Director of Public Affairs. She has worked on education reform efforts for the Middle East Partnership Initiative and on public diplomacy and academic exchange activities, including managing the prestigious Fulbright Program, to enhance mutual understanding in the Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs. In 2006, Ms. Blayne-Allard was designated a special advisor for international affairs to the U.S. Secretary of Education and worked closely with the U.S. Mission to UNESCO on Education for All goals. Prior to joining the State Department in 2000, Ms. Blayne-Allard was Assistant Director for International Studies at Goucher College. Ms. Blayne-Allard holds a Master of Arts degree from American University and has done doctoral work at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Gwendolyn M. Bookman, Director, Center for Global Studies and External Partnerships and Associate Professor of Political Science, Bennett College for Women

Gwendolyn Bookman is an attorney and has worked in a variety of responsible positions in higher education administration for over forty years.  In addition to her Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree, Bookman completed post-graduate study at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University (MA) in international economics, law and politics. At Bennett, she is an associate professor and teaches law- and globally-focused courses.  In addition to her teaching responsibilities at Bennett, she is the director of the Center for Global Studies and External Partnerships and oversees all aspects of the college’s internationalization.  In June/July 2011, Bookman participated in the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad in Morocco and Tunisia studying Christianity, Islam, Judaism and Arabic.  She has been involved in the Arusha (Tanzania) Sister Cities Committee in Durham (NC) since 2003 and has served on a number of other boards.  She is currently the chair of the New Cities Committee of Sister Cities of Durham.  Bookman has extensive international travel and a passion for global education.

Richard D. Brecht, Co-Director, American Councils Education Research Center, and Director, Language Policy Initiatives, University of Maryland

Richard Brecht is Director of Language Policy Initiatives at the University of Maryland, having recently retired from his position as the founding Executive Director of the Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL) at the University of Maryland.  Having received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard in Slavic Languages and Literatures, he has taught at Cornell, Bryn Mawr, and the University of Maryland.  In addition to being the founding Executive Director of CASL, Dr. Brecht has been a principal in the founding, development, and leadership of numerous other national organizations and projects: American Councils for International Education/ACTR-ACCELS, where he served as Founding Chair of the Board of Trustees; the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages, and the National Foreign Language Center, where he was director from 1999 to 2003. Dr. Brecht has testified in Congress before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor, the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, the U.S. House Armed Services Committee, and most recently before the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

Thomas R. Bruce, Director, Legal Information Institute, Cornell Law School

Tom is the Director of the Legal Information Institute at the Cornell Law School, which he co-founded in 1992.  Last year, the LII provided open access to American legal information to over 25 million individuals from 246 countries and territories.  It is a well-regarded leader in legal information science.  Internationally, Tom has advised legal-information projects on four continents, most recently as a consultant for the Open Society Institute on an umbrella project serving South Africa, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, Lesotho, Liberia, and Zambia, and has conducted workshops at the World Bank and the UN.   He has served as an invited expert for the Hague Conference on Private International Law and for the European Commission, as well as a Senior International Fellow at the University of Melbourne Law School and as a member of the board of directors of the Southern African Institute for Policy and Research.  He wrote the first web browser for Microsoft Windows.   Previously, Tom was a production manager and troubleshooter for Lyric Opera of Chicago, Houston Grand Opera, Spoleto Festival USA, and a wide variety of other producing organizations. 

William Brustein, Vice Provost for Global Strategies and International Affairs, Ohio State University

William I. Brustein is Vice Provost for Global Strategies and International Affairs and Professor of Sociology, Political Science, and History at The Ohio State University. His work at Ohio State is dedicated to fully integrating international and multicultural experiences to the academic units within the university and expanding and enhancing its global reach. Before coming to Ohio State in 2009, he was the Associate Provost for International Affairs and Director of International Programs and Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Brustein has published widely in the areas of political extremism and ethnic/religious/racial prejudice. His 1996 book The Logic of Evil: The Social Origins of the Nazi Party, 1925-1933 was named the winner of the 1997 James S. Coleman Distinguished Contribution to Rational-Choice Scholarship from the American Sociological Association. He is currently Chair of the Senior International Officers of the Committee for Institutional Cooperation, and serves on the Boards of the Midwest Universities Consortium for International Activities, the Columbus Council on World Affairs and Columbus Sister Cities International. Brustein is the recipient of the 2013 Charles Klasek Award for outstanding service to the field of international education administration by the Association of International Education Administrators.

Colin Campbell, President, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Mr. Colin Goetz Campbell serves as the President, Chief Executive Officer and a Trustee at Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Mr. Campbell served as President of Rockefeller Brothers Fund from 1988 to 2000. Mr. Campbell serves as Chairman of Public Broadcasting Services (PBS) and Rockefeller & Co. Inc. He serves as a Director of Rockefeller Financial Services, Inc., and HSB Engineering Insurance Limited. Mr. Campbell serves as a Trustee at Pomona College. He served as a Director of HSB Group Inc. since September 1983. Mr. Campbell served as a Director at SYSCO Corporation from 1989 to March 1, 2006. He served as a Director at Pitney Bowes Inc. from 1977 to May 2006.

Rahim Charania, Chief Executive Officer, American Fueling Systems

Rahim Charania is the CEO of American Fueling Systems (AFS), a Georgia-based company specializing in the production and distribution of alternative fuels. Mr. Charania has more than 20 years of business experience and has in-depth knowledge of the fueling and energy industries.  As the CEO of AFS he has distinguished himself as a leader and innovator in this growing industry. Mr. Charania is a highly sought after speaker for topics ranging from global energy consumption to local fueling solutions. Mr. Charania’s experience in business management, strategic planning, finance and sales has helped him build businesses valued at over $120 million throughout his career. In 2011, Mr. Charania was named one of Atlanta Business Chronicle’s Top 40 Executives under 40 and was honored in 2012 by Georgia State University with its Outstanding Young Alumnus Award. Mr. Charania received his bachelor’s of business administration degree and executive MBA from the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University.   Currently, Mr. Charania sits on the Board of the J. Mack Robinson Business School and is Chair of the Student Engagement committee.

Monica Clark, Council on American Overseas Research Centers

Monica Clark currently serves as the Program Manager for the Council of American Overseas Research Centers in Washington. She collaborates with international and domestic center leadership to deliver advanced research programs and manages the State Department grant for 20 Overseas Research Centers, among many other responsibilities regarding participants and programs. She has been with CAORC for more than 4 years, with many more years of international experience working with the National Democratic Institute and the Grameen Foundation, as well as two master’s degrees from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

Gary L. Clinton, Advisor, University of North Carolina Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) and Global Business Projects Citigroup Inc., Managing Director (ret)

Gary Clinton is a Lecturer at UNC’s Kenan-Flagler Business School where he works on MBA student consulting projects in the US, China, and India.  He is a member of the UNC CIBER Advisory Board.  Prior to his work at Kenan-Flagler, Mr. Clinton had a 39 year career with Citigroup. He retired in 2007 as Asia Pacific Region Head for Citigroup’s Global Relationship Banking business, a business comprising 200 relationship managers in 14 countries.  Based in Hong Kong, he was responsible for Citigroup’s relationships with non-Asian based multinational corporations in the region.  Prior to that he was based in Seoul, Korea responsible for Citi's business with large, global Korean companies.  In Hong Kong, Mr. Clinton was active with the American Chamber of Commerce, serving as its Chairman in 2007. Gary holds a BSBA from the University of Delaware and an MBA from Pace University in New York.

Shirley Daniel, Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

Shirley J. Daniel, Ph.D. is Professor of Accountancy and Director of the Pacific Asian Management Institute (PAMI) in the Shidler College of Business Administration at the University of Hawaii.  She is also Director of the federally-funded Center for International Business Education and Research.  She received her Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University, majoring in accounting with minors in economics and quantitative methods.  Prior to her graduate studies, Dr. Daniel was a manager in an international accounting firm, serving clients in a variety of industries, such as manufacturing, distribution, retailing, real estate development and oil and gas exploration.  Dr. Daniel is a licensed CPA, is past-president of the Hawaii Society of CPAs, and serves on the Board of Directors of American Savings Bank in Hawai'i. She is a member of the editorial boards of Management International Review, and the Journal of Teaching in International Business.Dr. Daniel works closely with organizations in Hawaii and the Asia Pacific Region to promote international business and economic development through education and training.  She has generated over $25 million in sponsored research and training programs at the University of Hawai'i, and founded the State of Hawaii GEAR UP program, a federally-funded program which helps low-income youth prepare for college. 

Dan Davidson, President, American Councils for International Education

Dr. Dan E. Davidson holds the Ph.D. in Slavic Languages from Harvard University and is s author or editor of 44 books, 60 articles in the fields of language, culture, and educational development, including a major twenty-year longitudinal study of adult SLA.  He has directed 35 Ph.D. dissertations at Bryn Mawr and served as co-chairman of George Soros’ Transformation of the Humanities and Social Sciences initiative, is current Chair of the College Board World Languages Academic Advisory Committee, immediate past president of the Joint National Committee for Languages (JNCL) and Board member of a number of universities and international organizations. Davidson is an elected member of the Russian and Ukrainian Academies of Education Sciences and recipient of honorary doctoral degrees from the Russian Academy of Sciences and 3 other universities in the region.  Dr. Davidson holds awards for distinguished service to the profession from AATSEEL and ADFL/MLA.

Jacques deLisle, Director, Center for East Asian Studies and Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania

Jacques deLisle is the Stephen A. Cozen Professor of Law, professor of political science, director of the Center for East Asian Studies and deputy director of the Center for the Study of Contemporary China at the University of Pennsylvania, and director of the Asia Program at the Foreign Policy Research Institute.  He has been a visiting professor at universities in East Asia and elsewhere. His scholarship focuses on China’s engagement with the international legal order, domestic legal reform and its relationship to economic and political change in China, “legal transplants” and comparative law, Taiwan’s international status, and U.S.-China relations. He has served as an attorney-adviser in the Office of Legal Counsel in the Department of Justice, a law clerk to then-Judge Stephen G. Breyer, a consultant, lecturer and advisor to legal reform, development and education programs in or for China, and an expert witness on issues of Chinese law.

Richard Drobnick,  Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

Dr. Drobnick is the founding director of the Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) at the Marshall School of Business. From 1994 to 2005, Drobnick served as USC's inaugural Vice Provost for International Affairs. Drobnick was the inaugural Secretary General and a member of the Steering Committee (1997-2011) of the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU), an association of presidents of 42 leading Pacific Rim research universities. From 2006 to 2011, Drobnick launched and led APRU's Pacific Rim research programs on "Sustainability and Climate Change" and "Public Health". Presently, Drobnick serves as APRU's Senior Strategic Advisor on its "Sustainability and Climate Change" and "Global Public Health" activities. Drobnick specializes in Pacific Rim economic and business issues and U.S. and Pacific Rim trade policies. He is the author of numerous articles as well as the co-author of Neither Feast nor Famine: Food Conditions to the Year 2000 and co-editor of Small Firms in Global Competition. Drobnick is a member of the United States Asia Pacific Council, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the Executive Committee of the Advisory Council of the Asia Society’s Southern California Center, and a director of the Japan-America Society of Southern California. From 1967 to 1969, Drobnick served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Malaysia.

Rosemary Feal, Executive Director, Modern Language Association

Since 2002, Rosemary G. Feal has served as executive director of the Modern Language Association of America. She administers the business affairs, programs, and governance of the association; is general editor of the association’s publishing and research programs and editor of two MLA publications; and serves as an ex officio member of all committees and commissions of the association. She is on leave from her position as professor of Spanish at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. From 1987 to 1998 she was a member of the faculty at the University of Rochester. A member and a past vice president of the Board of Directors of the National Humanities Alliance, she also served on the Board of Directors of the American Council of Learned Societies. Her book publications include Isabel Allende Today (coeditor; 2002); Painting on the Page: Interartistic Approaches to Modern Hispanic Texts (coauthor; 1995); and Novel Lives: The Fictional Autobiographies of Guillermo Cabrera Infante and Mario Vargas Llosa (author; 1986). Rosemary Feal was a 2011–12 American Council on Education Fellow at the Five Colleges, Incorporated. She earned a PhD in Spanish from the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, and a BA from Allegheny College. Rosemary Feal also completed the Bachillerato en Letras at the Instituto Belga Guatemalteco.

Thomas Fingar, Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University

Dr. Thomas Fingar is the inaugural Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. He was the Payne Distinguished Lecturer at Stanford during January-December 2009.  From May 2005 through December 2008, he served as the first Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Analysis and, concurrently, as Chairman of the National Intelligence Council. Dr. Fingar served previously as Assistant Secretary of the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research (2004-2005), Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary (2001-2003), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Analysis (1994-2000), Director of the Office of Analysis for East Asia and the Pacific (1989-1994), and Chief of the China Division (1986-1989). Between 1975 and 1986 he held a number of positions at Stanford University, including Senior Research Associate in the Center for International Security and Arms Control. Dr. Fingar is a graduate of Cornell University (A.B. in Government and History, 1968), and Stanford University (M.A., 1969 and Ph.D., 1977 both in Political Science).  His most recent book is Reducing Uncertainty:  Intelligence Analysis and National Security (Stanford University Press, 2011).                       

Trevellya Ford-Ahmed, Professor of Communications and former Director of International Programs, West Virginia State University

Tee Ford-Ahmed is Professor of Communication/Media Studies and former Outreach Liaison for the Office of International Affairs at West Virginia State University (WVSU) which opened as a result of US Department of Education Title VI funding.  She continues in her role as Liaison Officer for the newly launched International Studies Program.    She recently completed a short narrative film titled #Camel which was produced by WVSU and the University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirate.  In addition to filmmaking she has co-authored journal articles and anthologies including Opening an Office of International Affairs: a Case Study; Building Diverse Communities: Applications of Communication Research and I too, am a Coal Miner’s Daughter which is part of the cultural studies anthology Generation to Generation, Maintaining Cultural Identity over Time.  She is also recipient of the WV Women’s Commission “Celebrate Women in Education” award.   Tee earned the Ph.D. in Mass Communication from The Ohio University, an MA in Speech Communication from New York University, and a BFA in Theater Arts from the Art Institute of Chicago.

Margo Glew, Director, Global Educators Cohort Program, Department of Teacher Education, College of Education, Michigan State University

Margo Glew is Coordinator of Global Initiatives and Director of the Global Educators Cohort Program in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University where she coordinates efforts to enhance the teacher preparation program with global perspectives so that more teachers are prepared to educate students for success in a global society. Her academic work has focused on second language acquisition and instruction and internationalizing teacher education. Currently, her work focuses on the development of best practices in internationalizing teacher preparation and assessment of global competence of teacher candidates.  

John Grandin, Professor Emeritus of German and Executive Director Emeritus, International Engineering Program, University of Rhode Island

John M. Grandin is Professor Emeritus of German and Director Emeritus of the International Engineering Program at the University of Rhode Island. Grandin has received numerous awards for his work combining languages and engineering, including the Federal Cross of Honor from the Federal Republic of Germany, the Award for Educational Innovation from ABET, and the Michael P. Malone Award for Excellence in International Education from the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges.  He has published widely on such cross-disciplinary initiatives and has been the principle investigator for several funded projects related to the development of the International Engineering Program.  Grandin also founded and organized the Annual Colloquium on International Engineering Education, bringing together university faculty and business representatives to develop a more global engineering education nationally. Grandin served as associate dean and acting dean of URI’s College of Arts and Sciences, and as chair of the Department of Languages.  He also has published several articles and a book on Franz Kafka.

Charles R. Hale, Director, Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies and Benson Collection, University of Texas at Austin

Director of LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections, at the University of Texas at Austin.  Professor in the Departments of Anthropology and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.  Author of Resistance and Contradiction: Miskitu Indians and the Nicaraguan State, 1894-1987 (Stanford, 1994); and of “Más que un indio…”  Racial Ambivalence and Neoliberal Multiculturalism in Guatemala (SAR, 2006); editor of the volume, Engaging Contradictions:  Theory, Politics and Methods of Activist Scholarship (UC Press), and author of numerous articles on identity politics, racism, neoliberalism and resistance among indigenous and afro-descendant peoples of Latin America.  President of the Latin American Studies Association, April 2006 through October 2007.

Stephen E. Hanson, Vice Provost for International Affairs and Director of the Reves Center for International Studies, College of William & Mary

Stephen E. Hanson (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1991; BA, Harvard, 1985) is Vice Provost for International Affairs, Director of the Wendy and Emery Reves Center for International Studies, and Lettie Pate Evans Professor in the Department of Government at the College of William & Mary. He is the author of Post-Imperial Democracies: Ideology and Party Formation in Third Republic France, Weimar Germany, and Post-Soviet Russia (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and Time and Revolution: Marxism and the Design of Soviet Institutions (University of North Carolina Press, 1997), which won the 1998 Wayne S. Vucinich book award from the Association for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies.  He is also a co-editor of Capitalism and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe: Assessing the Legacy of Communist Rule (Cambridge University Press, 2003), a co-author of Postcommunism and the Theory of Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2001), and the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters examining postcommunist politics in comparative perspective.

Caitlin Haugen, Executive Director, Global Teacher Education

Caitlin Haugen is the Executive Director of Global Teacher Education, a nonprofit organization that supports internationalization of teacher preparation through a website and online community – GlobalTeacherEducation.org. With 15 years of experience as an educator, she has worked as a classroom teacher, a teacher trainer in the Peace Corps in Uganda and Thailand, and an undergraduate instructor. Her research has focused on global competency development and barriers to the teaching profession worldwide.  She hold an undergraduate degree in elementary education and early childhood education from Drake University, a Master’s Degree from the International Training Program (ITEP) at American University, and a PhD in international education policy from the University of Maryland.

Dan Hazen, Associate Librarian of Harvard College for Collection Development

Dan Hazen's career at Harvard began in 1990 as librarian for Latin America, Spain, and Portugal in Widener. He was appointed to succeed Barbara Halporn as the head of collection development in Widener earlier this year. Hazen has extensive experience in collection development and is frequently invited to publish, speak, and consult both in the US and abroad. He was a visiting program officer in the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and was chosen to serve as the director of the ARL/AAU Global Resources Program from 2002 to 2004, stepping aside in order to devote full energies to his collection development responsibilities in Widener. He continues to serve as an informal advisor to some of the world's large research libraries, with a special interest in the development of collaborative collection programs. Hazen received his PhD in Latin American history from Yale and an MSLIS from Simmons. He earned his undergraduate degree at Cornell. 

Jon Huntsman Jr., U.S. Ambassador to China (2009-2011) and Governor of Utah (2005-2009)

Governor Jon M. Huntsman, Jr. began his career in public service as a staff assistant to President Ronald Reagan. He has since served four U.S. Presidents in critical roles around the world including Ambassador to Singapore, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Asia, U.S. Trade Ambassador and most recently U.S. Ambassador to China.Twice elected as Utah's Governor, Huntsman brought about strong economic reforms, tripled the states rainy day fund and helped bring unemployment rates to historic lows. During his tenure Utah was named the best managed state in America and best state in which to do business. Recognized by others for his service, Huntsman was elected as chairman of the Western Governors Association, serving 19 states throughout the region.

Huntsman ran as a candidate for the 2012 Republican Presidential nomination. He now serves as co-chair, along with Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, of No Labels, a growing citizens’ movement of Democrats, Republicans and everything in between dedicated to promoting a new politics of problem solving. He also hosts a weekly radio program on SiriusXM, No Labels Radio with Jon Huntsman. Huntsman serves on the board of Ford Motor Company, Caterpillar Corporation, Huntsman Corporation, The U.S. Naval Academy Foundation, The University of Pennsylvania, as a distinguished fellow at the Brookings Institute, a trustee of the Reagan Presidential Foundation, a trustee of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and as chairman of The Huntsman Cancer Foundation.  He has served as a visiting fellow at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government as well as a distinguished lecturer at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. He is a graduate of The University of Pennsylvania and has seven honorary doctorate degrees.

Tony Jackson, Vice President for Education, Asia Society

Anthony Jackson leads Asia Society’s Education Department which strives to enable all students to graduate high school prepared for college, for work in the global economy, and for 21st century global citizenship.  Jackson oversees the Education Department’s multi-faceted approach which includes the International Studies Schools Network, a network of over 35 globally focused schools around the United States and the Chinese language initiative which provides national leadership in creating effective approaches for teaching and partnerships to support learning of Chinese language and culture.  Trained in both developmental psychology and education, Jackson is one of the nation’s leading experts on secondary school reform and adolescent development. Jackson directed the Carnegie Corporation’s Task Force on the Education of Young Adolescents which produced the ground breaking report Turning Points: Educating Adolescents in the 21st Century.  He also co-authored the follow-up blueprint Turning Points 2000, a seminal volume on secondary school reform.  His most recent work is Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage the World.

Deborah Jakubs, Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs, Duke University

Deborah Jakubs is Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs at Duke University, and president-elect of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL).  Prior to her appointment in 2005, she was Director of Collections Services, founding head of the International and Area Studies Department, and Librarian for Latin America and Iberia at Duke.  As Visiting Program Officer at ARL, she launched the Global Resources Program, an initiative of ARL and the Association of American Universities (AAU), and directed it. Jakubs holds a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin - Madison, an M.L.I.S. from the University of California - Berkeley, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Latin American History from Stanford University.  She is an adjunct associate professor of history at Duke. .She has served as Director and Associate Director of the Consortium on Latin American Studies at Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill, a Title VI National Resource Center, and on the steering committee of the Program for Latin American Libraries and Archives of Harvard’s Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies.

Linda Jorn, Associate Vice Provost for Learning Technologies and DoIT Director of Academic Technology, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Linda Jorn serves as Associate Vice Provost of Learning Technologies and Division of Information Technology (DoIT) Director of Academic Technology, at the University of Wisconsin Madison. Linda works with campus leaders to set campus strategic priorities around educational innovation and to design efficient, yet flexible organizational structures that can quickly respond to transformational changes.  During Linda’s work career she has brought in over $3,642,000 in grant and project money and has lead or held membership in over 26 academic technology committees/councils. She has served on the EDUCAUSE Advisory Committee for Teaching and Learning, EDUCAUSE’s Learning Initiative Advisory Board, and served as the CIC Learning Technology chair-elect, chair, and chair emeritus. In addition she has served on ten CIC and national conference and program planning committees. Linda has a twenty-year history of publishing and presenting about the impact of technology on teaching and learning with over 84 presentations, 19 grants, and 16 publications. She is dedicated to an interdisciplinary intellectual approach to her work and draws on key theories and practices from such disciplines as education, rhetoric, communication, and leadership.

Olga Kagan, Director, National Heritage Language Resource Center, UCLA

Olga Kagan is a professor in the UCLA Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and director of the Title VI National Heritage Language Resource Center (NHLRC).  Kagan is in charge of the UCLA Russian Language Program and the Russian Flagship Center. She has published several textbooks of Russian both as a foreign language and as a heritage language.  Her textbook of Russian as a Heritage Language, Russian for Russians, received a book award from the American Association of Teachers of Russian and Eastern European Languages (AATSEEL). She has also co-edited two volumes of research articles and publishes widely on heritage language issues. She is editor of the Heritage Language Journal.

Hilary Kahn, Director, Center for the Study of Global Change, Indiana University

Dr. Hilary E. Kahn is the Director of the Center for the Study of Global Change in the Indiana University School of Global and International Studies.  She is also the Director of the Ph.D. Minor in Global Studies and leads the Framing the Global Research and Publication Project, the Global Learning Across Indiana Project, and the Voices and Visions: Islam and Muslims from a Global Perspective Project.  Professor Kahn received her doctorate in cultural anthropology from the University of Buffalo and is faculty in International Studies and Anthropology.  Her areas of research and expertise include global teaching and learning, visual anthropology, grounded global studies, critical social theory, transnational identities, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the internationalization of higher education. She wrote Seeing and Being Seen: The Q'eqchi' Maya of Guatemala and Beyond and she is the editor of Framing the Global: Entry Points for Research an edited volume about critical and grounded global studies that is coming out in summer 2014.  She is currently on the Executive Committee of AIEA (Association of International Education Administrators) and the Advisory Board for Diversity and Democracy of AAC&U (Association of American Colleges and Universities). 

Anthony Kane, Senior Manager, China Programs, American Councils for International Education; Former Director, Hopkins-Nanjing Center

Tony Kane is Senior Manager for China Programs at American Councils for International Education, directing a range of programs that seek to enhance the Chinese language ability of students of all ages and contributing significantly to President Obama’s “100,000 Strong” initiative announced in 2011. Trained as a historian of modern China at Harvard and the University of Michigan, he has spent most of his career working to increase understanding between China and the United States.  After beginning his career teaching at the University of California, San Diego, in 1982, Dr. Kane was hired by The Asia Society in New York in 1986 as director of the China Council, In 1991 he moved to the People’s Republic of China as American Co-Director of the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies, and he subsequently became executive director of the program. More recently he spent another two years in China, living in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, where his wife was posted by the World Bank and where he consulted with a group of international schools to improve their Chinese language teaching curriculum. He returned from China and began working at American Councils in 2008, where he develops academic programs.

Miriam Kazanjian, Independent Consultant, Coalition for International Education

Miriam A. Kazanjian is a senior international education and government relations specialist in Washington, DC, where she has engaged in federal education policy issues from K-12 through the professions spanning over four decades. She has represented the New York and California educational systems, consulted for public and private institutions in the U.S. and abroad, and served in leadership positions and advisory boards of numerous international education and exchange programs. Since the early 1990s, Ms. Kazanjian has been instrumental in creating and guiding the Coalition for International Education, a group of thirty higher education associations promoting U.S. global competence, with focus on the U.S. Department of Education’s role in international and foreign language education.  She organized the first national policy research conference on HEA-Title VI/Fulbright-Hays at UCLA (1997), and was co-editor and contributing author to the subsequent publication, International Education in the New Global Era.  She organized two follow-up policy conferences at Duke University (2003) and at the College of William & Mary (2014).  She has presented and published widely on federal education policy issues.  Ms. Kazanjian holds a BA in history and political science from the University of Rochester and an MPA from George Washington University.  Passionate about language and culture, she also has studied Arabic, French and Portuguese.

Ben Kedia, Director, Center for International Business Education and Research, University of Memphis

Ben L. Kedia holds the Wang Chair of Excellence in International Business and is Director of the Wang Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) at The University of Memphis.  Prior to coming to Memphis in 1989, Dr. Kedia taught international business and management at Texas Tech University (1975-78) and at Louisiana State University (1978-89).  He has served as visiting professor in France, Germany, India, and Czech Republic.  In addition to his academic and administrative responsibilities, he has served as a consultant and provided executive training for FedEx, Smith & Nephew, Citibank, Morgan Guaranty Trust Company, American Cyanamid, and Entech Systems. He has presented papers and/or seminars in Mexico, Canada, Austria, Hungary, the Czech and Slovak Republics, Poland, India, Singapore, Thailand, and Malaysia. He received his Ph.D. from Case-Western Reserve University (1976) in Cleveland, Ohio.

Robert O. Keohane, Professor of International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

Robert O. Keohane is Professor of International Affairs, Princeton University. He is the author of After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy (1984) and Power and Governance in a Partially Globalized World (2002). He is co-author (with Joseph S. Nye, Jr.) of Power and Interdependence (third edition 2001), and (with Gary King and Sidney Verba) of Designing Social Inquiry (1994).  He has served as the editor of International Organization and as president of the International Studies Association and the American Political Science Association. He won the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, 1989, and the Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science, 2005.  He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences; he is a Corresponding Member of the British Academy.

Gail Kligman, Director, Center for European and Eurasian Studies, UCL

Gail Kligman’s research has focused on politics, culture, and gender in Central East Europe, both during the communist period and since its demise, and includes extensive field research in Romania. She is co-author with Katherine Verdery of Peasants under Siege: Collectivization in Romania, 1949-1962 (Princeton UP, 2011), which won the 2012 Barbara Jelavich Book Prize, the Davis Center Book Prize, and the Heldt Prize from the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and received two Honorable Mentions by the American Sociological Association for Best Book in Comparative-Historical Sociology and Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship, Political Sociology Section Best Book. Kligman has held teaching appointments at the University of Chicago, UC Berkeley, University of Texas at Austin, Stanford University, and Georgetown University. She has received many prestigious research grants, including awards from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, the MacArthur Foundation, the Soros Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation.

Helena Kolenda, Program Director for Asia, Henry Luce Foundation

Helena Kolenda is Program Director for Asia at the Henry Luce Foundation. Prior to this appointment in 2008, she served for a decade as program officer for the Foundation’s Asia Program.  Ms. Kolenda holds an A.B. in Chinese Language and Literature from the University of California, Berkeley (1980) and a J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law (1989).  Between 1981 and 1996, she spent ten years in China, working first as an English teacher with Volunteers in Asia and later as an attorney with the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison.  She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and the National Committee on United States-China Relations, and a trustee of the Lingnan Foundation.

Stacy Korbelak, Assistant Professor of English and Coordinator, Global Distinction Program, Howard Community College

Stacy Korbelak is an Assistant Professor of English at Howard Community College in Columbia, Maryland where she also coordinates the award-winning Global Distinction Program.  In July 2012, Stacy was appointed by Governor Martin O' Malley to a five year term on the Anne Arundel County School Board and is currently chairing the superintendent search committee. Stacy is also active in several professional organizations, serving on the legislative committee and as a teacher of the year judge for MABE (the Maryland Association of Boards of Education), the legislative policy analyst for TYCA (Two-Year College English Association) and a member of the Integrated Community Stakeholders Team for the global citizenship program at Arundel High School.

Kurt Kuehn, Chief Financial Officer, United Parcel Service

Mr. Kurt P. Kuehn has been Chief Financial Officer of United Parcel Service Inc. (UPS) since January 2008 and serves as its Principal Accounting Officer. Mr. Kuehn has been Senior Vice President of United Parcel Service Inc., since 2008. He served as Treasurer of United Parcel Service Inc from 2008 to 2010. Mr. Kuehn served as Senior Vice President of Worldwide Sales and Marketing of United Parcel Service from 2004 to January 2008. He served as Marketing Group Manager until January 2008. He served as Vice President of Business Information analysis for UPS and oversaw market research, strategic cost analysis, competitive analysis and data mining. Mr. Kuehn also served as UPS's first vice president of Investor Relations. He joined UPS in 1977 as a Delivery Driver. He has been a Director of NCR Corporation since May 30, 2012. He Attended Yale University and received a Master's Degree in Business Administration from the University of Miami. He is also a graduate of the Advanced Management Program of Wharton.

Charles Kurzman,  Professor of Sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Charles Kurzman is a professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and co-director of the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations. He is author of The Missing Martyrs (2011), Democracy Denied, 1905-1915 (2008), and The Unthinkable Revolution in Iran (2004), and editor of the anthologies Liberal Islam (1998) and Modernist Islam, 1840-1940 (2002). With support from the National Science Foundation, he is currently studying long-term trends in the internationalization of American social science.

Jerry Lampe, Independent Consultant and Senior Academic Advisor, Arabic Flagship Programs, American Councils for International Education

Independent consultant, currently serving as Senior Academic Advisor to the American Councils International Education (ACIE) for the Arabic Overseas Flagship Programs and the National Foreign Language Center (NFLC) and advisor to academic institutions and government  programs. Formerly, Deputy Director, NFLC, and Director, Language Studies, SAIS of Johns Hopkins University, the Center of Arabic Study Abroad (CASA), and Peace Corps training programs in Tunisia and Morocco and past President of the American Association of Teachers of Arabic (AATA). M.A. & Ph.D. in International Relations, Johns Hopkins University. Author of Culture Proficiency Guidelines 3.2 (23rd version) and co-author of the ILR Skill Level Descriptions for Competence in Intercultural Communication.

Jeffrey W. Legro, Vice Provost for Global Affairs, University of Virginia

Jeffrey W. Legro is Vice Provost for Global Affairs and Taylor Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia. A specialist on international relations, Legro is the author of Rethinking the World: Great Power Strategies and International Order (2005) and Cooperation under Fire: Anglo-German Restraint during World War II (1995) and the co-editor of To Lead the World: U.S. Strategy after the Bush Doctrine (2008) and In Uncertain Times: American Foreign Policy after the Berlin Wall and 9/11 (2011). Legro received his B.A. from Middlebury College and Ph.D. from UCLA. He previously was on the faculty at the University of Minnesota and has taught at China Foreign Affairs University in Beijing. In 2011 he was a Fulbright-Nehru Senior Researcher at the Institute for Defense and Strategic Analyses in New Delhi.

Jamie Leite, Director, Portuguese Dual Language Immersion, Utah State Office of Education

Jamie Leite is the Portuguese Dual Language Immersion Director for the Utah State Office of Education. She is responsible for developing curriculum, providing professional development, and overseeing six Portuguese immersion programs across the state. She works as Program Director for the Utah Portuguese STARTALK grant. As a member of the Utah immersion team, she helps with the administration of Utah’s immersion model at the school, district, and state levels.  Jamie also acts as the Dual Language Immersion Coordinator for Provo School District in Provo, Utah. In 2013, she began teaching the course Foundations of Dual Language Immersion at Utah Valley University.  She holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Brigham Young University and a master’s degree in education from Utah Valley University. Her thesis was a history of Utah immersion titled, Mainstreaming Dual Language Immersion: The Utah Model for Replicable and Sustainable Language Education. Prior to joining the Utah immersion team, Jamie was a classroom teacher for six years.

Constance Malpas, Program Officer, OCLC Research

Constance Malpas is a Program Officer with OCLC Research and works with a team based in the San Francisco Bay Area.  She manages a program of work examining the transition of scholarly work from print-based media to networked resources, and the impact of this transition on the organization of academic libraries.  Since 2007, she has led a research agenda exploring the policy and infrastructure requirements for shared print management, including detailed investigations of ‘last copy’ preservation agreements, metadata standards for registration of shared print collections, and the role of mass digitization in print management strategies.  Constance holds degrees from Mount Holyoke College and Princeton University. Her most recent publications include “Right-scaling Stewardship: A multi-scale perspective on cooperative print strategies (OCLC, 2014), “Understanding the Collective Collection: Towards a System-wide Perspective on Library Print Collections” (OCLC, 2013) and “Print Management at ‘Mega-scale’: a Regional Perspective on Print Book collections in North America” (OCLC, 2012).

Jennifer Manise, Executive Director, Longview Foundation

Jennifer Manise is the Executive Director of the Longview Foundation for World Affairs and International Understanding. Since it was founded in 1966, the Longview Foundation has been seeking to build a more peaceful, just, & sustainable world by equipping youth with a global perspective and understanding of political, social, and environmental issues worldwide. Prior to joining the Longview Foundation, Ms. Manise worked at the Council of Chief State School Officers.

Gail McGinn, Independent Consultant,  Former Deputy Undersecretary for Planning, Office of the Under Secretary for Personnel and Readiness, U.S. Department of Defense

In 37 years of service with the Department of Defense, Mrs. McGinn managed a diverse portfolio, including foreign language, military and civilian personnel management; program evaluation and strategic planning; military families and communities; service member transition to veteran status; and wounded warrior matters.  She retired in 2010 as Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Plans.  Since then, Mrs. McGinn has provided independent advice, consultation, and written materials in these and other areas of expertise.  Mrs. McGinn was appointed as Senior Language Authority for the Department of Defense in 2004, with responsibility for improving foreign language capability within the Department. She played a major role in national efforts to address foreign language shortfalls, including the National Language Conference and National Security Language Initiative.  Mrs. McGinn graduated Magna Cum Laude with a B.A. in Psychology from William Smith College (Phi Beta Kappa).  She earned a Master’s Degree in Education from Boston University. She is an honorary member of the Phi Sigma Iota foreign language honor society.  Upon retirement, Mrs. McGinn was awarded an honorary Associate of Arts Degree in Foreign Languages by the Commandant of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, and the Language Flagship Leadership Award.

Scott McGinnis, Defense Language Institute

Dr. Scott McGinnis (Ph.D. Ohio State University, 1990) is the Academic Advisor for the Washington Office of the Defense Language Institute (DLI). He also holds the academic rank of professor at DLI. Between 1999 and 2003, he served as Executive Director of the National Council of Organizations of Less Commonly Taught Languages at the National Foreign Language Center in College Park, Maryland. In almost three decades in the language teaching profession, he has held positions at institutions including the University of Pennsylvania and Middlebury College, and has a decade of experience as supervisor of the Chinese language programs at the University of Oregon and University of Maryland. Dr. McGinnis has authored or edited five books, and over 50 book chapters, journal articles and reviews on language pedagogy and linguistics for the less commonly taught languages in general, and Chinese and Japanese in particular. He previously served two terms as President of the Chinese Language Teachers Association, as chair of The College Board Chinese Language Test Development Committee for the Educational Testing Service, and as a member of the Board of Examiners for the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Paul McVeigh, Associate Vice President, Global Studies and Programs, Northern Virginia Community College

Paul McVeigh is Associate Vice President for Global Studies and Programs at Northern Virginia Community College where he has responsibility for the strategic leadership and operational coordination for all aspects of international programming.  He is a current member of the Advisory Council for the American Council on Education’s Internationalization Collaborative, the Board of Directors of the Forum on Education Abroad, the Executive Council of the Association of International Education Administrators, and the editorial committee of NAFSA’s International Educator.  In recent years he participated on the American Association of Colleges and University’s Global Learning Leadership Council and NAFSA’s Comprehensive Internationalization Task Force.  He has led a number international partnership projects and national grant initiatives, the most recent of which are the 2010 award of the Community College Initiative and the 2012 award of Brazil’s Science Without Borders Program to the new Community College Consortium. Prior to taking his present position, he was dean of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Alexandria Campus of NVCC.  His Ph.D. was earned at the University of Dublin, Ireland.

Gilbert Merkx, Director of International and Area Studies, Duke University

Gilbert W. Merkx is Director of the Center for International Studies at Duke University and a professor of sociology.  He was born in Maracaibo, Venezuela.  He previously taught at the University of New Mexico, Göteborgs Universitet (Sweden), and Yale.  He has been a visiting scholar at Stockholms Universitet and at the Instituto Torcuato Di Tella (Buenos Aires), and was a Fulbright Scholar at the Universidad de Huamanga (Ayacucho, Peru).  He is co-Chairman of the Council of Title VI National Resource Center Directors, and a past President of the Association of International Education Administrators.  He serves on the boards of the Scholars at Risk Network and Venice International University.  He has served as Chairman of the Group of Advisors of the National Security Education Program. He was Editor of the Latin American Research Review from 1980 to 2001. His research interests include globalization and the political economy of development.

David Obey, U.S. Representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District from 1969 to 2011, former Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee and Senior Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service (WIPPS)

Dave Obey served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1969-2011, representing Wisconsin’s 7th District. Of the over 10,000 people who have served in the House in the nation’s history, only 19 have served longer. As one of the longest serving leaders of the House Appropriations Committee, he was at the center of almost every major budget priority debate and became renowned for his ability to strike bipartisan consensus. He led the Foreign Operations Subcommittee during a decade of landmark world events including the collapse of the Soviet Union. Then from 1995 until his retirement, he served as the lead Democrat on the Labor, Health and Education Subcommittee championing education, worker rights, health care, and medical research. He earned his undergraduate and Master of Arts degrees in political science with a focus on Russian area studies at the University of Wisconsin. He serves as a senior fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service.

Matthew Ouimet, Director of Russia and Eurasia, Bureau of Intelligence and Research, U.S. Department of State

Matthew Ouimet is a Public Policy Scholar in residence at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, where he is completing a book project on Russian policy toward Asia. Dr. Ouimet is on leave from the U.S. Department of State, where he serves as Senior Analyst of Russian Foreign Policy in the Office of Analysis for Russia and Eurasia, Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR). In that capacity, his primary responsibility is Russian policy toward Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia and the Pacific. In 2007-2009, Dr Ouimet was tapped as the Department's first Director of Analytic Effectiveness, responsible for implementing reforms of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) in INR. Prior to joining the Department of State, Dr Ouimet taught Russian History and International Relations at the University of Washington and Columbia College, and was a Project Manager at the National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) in Seattle. Dr Ouimet is the author of The Rise and Fall of the Brezhnev Doctrine in Soviet Foreign Policy (UNC Press, 2003) and of numerous articles, book chapters, and presentations on Russian policy toward Asia. He also serves on the editorial board of the journal Studies in Intelligence.

Lynda Park, Executive Director, Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Lynda has been the executive director of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) since 2010. Prior to joining the ASEEES staff, she was the associate director of the University of Illinois Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center and then the European Union Center.  She serves as the ASEEES representative in the Coalition for International Education and the State Department’s Title VIII Advisory Committee.   She has a B.A. in History and Russian from Rice University and is ABD in the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History at the University of Michigan.  Her research examines the activities of the Imperial Russian Geographic Society in Siberia in the 19th century and the relationship between scientific knowledge production and empire-building.  She conducted archival research in St. Petersburg and Irkutsk, Russia.

Roy Paulson, President, Paulson Manufacturing Corporation; Member, President's Export Council, Subcommittee Export Administration; Chair, National District Export Council

Roy Paulson serves as CEO and President of the family owned business, Paulson Manufacturing Corp. Mr. Paulson brings his own direct experience of building an international business with Paulson International Ltd., setting up distribution and establishing a warehouse, engineering and sales team in Europe. Recently, he became the chair of the National District Export Council.  Mr. Paulson has received numerous awards and recognition for his work. Included among his accomplishments are District Export Council Appointment, Export Achievement Award (US Department of Commerce), Export Achievement (Proclamation, Riverside County), IEEBA Export Achievement, Indonesia Recognition Award, World Trade Week LA Area Chamber Export Achievement Award, EDA County of Riverside Export Achievement Award, Lifetime Achievement Award (California Inland Empire District Export Council), and SBA Exporter of the Year. He also holds many local and national positions and titles that speak to his passion for international commerce and his expertise.

Paul Primak, Director (retired), International Programs & International Internships, Oregon University System

Paul Primak is the former Director for the Oregon University System International Programs and IE3 Global Internships. Paul worked to expand international opportunities for Oregon and Pacific Northwest university partners. Long interested in the synergies of the academic, cultural and personal development dimensions of education abroad, Paul and his colleagues at the OUS began a series of assessment projects to attempt to measure second language acquisition and cultural literacy. His involvement with the Forum on Education Abroad has been a significant influence in seeking to improve the quality and measurement of the international experience. Prior to coming to his position as Director, he served as a Regional Director of International Programs and an Assistant Director at University of Oregon.

James A. Pritchett, President of the African Studies Association, and Professor of Anthropology, Michigan State University

James A. Pritchett is President of the African Studies Association and Professor of Anthropology at Michigan State University. He is the author of Lunda-Ndembu: Style, Change and Social Transformation in South Central Africa (University of Wisconsin Press, 2001), and Friends for Life, Friends for Death: Cohorts and Consciousness Among the Lunda-Ndembu (University of Virginia Press, 2007).  He has been a member of the Board of Advisors of the International Consortium for Law and Development, a Board Member of the African Presidential Archives and Research Center at Boston University, and a Research Officer at the University of Zambia.  Pritchett also has a strong interest in the African Diaspora and has studied communities of African-descended people in the Caribbean, Brazil and elsewhere in Central and South America.  He teaches courses on African history and culture, anthropological theory, development, and symbols, rituals and myths.

Peter D. Quella, Assistant Director, African Studies Center, Boston University

Peter Quella is the assistant director of the African Studies Center at Boston University and holds a PhD in African Languages and Literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with a specialty in Southern Sotho literature. He is director of the summer study abroad program “Swahili Language and Culture in East Africa,” hosted by the State University of Zanzibar, and serves as director of undergraduate studies.

Thomas F. Reese, Executive Director, Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University

Thomas F. Reese is Executive Director of the Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Tulane University.  His scholarship and publications include studies of eighteenth-century Spanish art and politics, culture contact in sixteenth-century Mexico, devotional space in Colonial Andean society, and contemporary architectural practice in Europe and the Americas.  His most recent research focuses on images and identity in turn of the century Argentina, Mexico, Panama and the U.S.   He served between 1986-1998 as the Deputy Director of the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles.

W. Taylor Reveley III, President, College of William & Mary 

Taylor Reveley was sworn in as the 27th president of the College of William & Mary on September 5, 2008, after serving as interim president since February 2008. Before assuming his current post, he served as dean of William & Mary Law School for almost a decade, starting in August 1998. He is the John Stewart Bryan Professor of Jurisprudence. Before joining William & Mary, Mr. Reveley practiced law for many years at Hunton & Williams, where he specialized in energy matters, especially those involving commercial nuclear power. He was the managing partner of the firm for nine years. Much of Mr. Reveley's extracurricular time over the years has gone to non-profit organizations. He has served on many educational and cultural boards, including those of Princeton University (where he is a trustee emeritus), Union Theological Seminary in Virginia, St. Christopher's School, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, JSTOR, and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace to name a few.

Mark Rosenberg, President, Florida International University

Mark B. Rosenberg is president of Florida International University. Dr. Rosenberg has served as the fifth president of FIU since August 2009. From 2005-2008, Dr. Rosenberg served as the Founding Chancellor for the Board of Governors of the State University System of Florida. Prior to becoming chancellor, Dr. Rosenberg was involved in the expansion and development of FIU into a major public research university. As Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs from 1998 to 2005, Dr. Rosenberg spearheaded the establishment of a law school and a medical school.   Dr. Rosenberg's academic career began at FIU in 1976 as an assistant professor of political science. In 1979, he founded the FIU Latin American and Caribbean Center. Dr. Rosenberg subsequently served as the Founding Dean of the College of Urban and Public Affairs and Vice Provost for International Studies. He has also been a Visiting Distinguished Research Professor at Vanderbilt University, and a Visiting Professor at the Instituto Tecnologico de Monterrey in Mexico.   Dr. Rosenberg earned a B.A. in 1971 from Miami University of Ohio and a Ph.D. in Political Science with a graduate certificate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from the University of Pittsburgh in 1976. He has written or co-edited seven books and numerous scholarly articles in leading journals. His latest book, The United States and Central America: Geopolitical Realities and Regional Fragility (2007), is a Harvard University project co-authored with Luis Guillermo Solis of Costa Rica. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, has testified before Congress numerous times, and has served as a consultant to the Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development.   Dr. Rosenberg is an appointee to the National Academy of Science study commission, he is Chairman of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities' STEM Task Force, sits on the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering and their Governance Committee; the Executive Committee of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities.  Dr. Rosenberg has been active with the Jewish Federation of Greater Miami and was a founding contributor to the Organization for Leadership Advancement in Miami. He is on the Board of Directors of the City National Bank of Florida, the Holocaust Memorial as part of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, the Florida Association of Colleges and Universities, and as Chair of the Beacon Council One Community One Goal Academic Leaders Council.

Heidi Ross, Director, Center for East Asian Studies, Indiana University

Heidi Ross is Director of the East Asian Studies Center and Professor of Educational Policy Studies at Indiana University, and co-director of the Australian National University-Indiana University Pan Asia Institute.  Ross earned her B.A. in Chinese Language and Literature at Oberlin College and her Ph.D. in Educational Foundations at The University of Michigan. She has taught at numerous institutions in East Asia and has served as president of the Comparative and International Education Society and co-editor of Comparative Education Review.  Ross is engaged with the latest developments in Chinese education and society and regularly collaborates and writes with her students.  . Her books include China Learns English (Yale), The Ethnographic Eye (Garland), and Taking Teaching Seriously (Paradigm). Ross was honored in 2011 with Indiana University’s President’s Award for Teaching Excellence and in 2012 with Indiana University’s Ryan Award for Distinguished Contributions to International Programs and Studies.

Nancy Ruther, Associate Director, The MacMillan Center, Yale University

Nancy L. Ruther has served as Associate Director of The MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University since 1988. Her longstanding research interest is the interaction of federal policy and the international capacity of the U.S. higher education system.  In 2010, she published “The Impact of Title VI Programs on the U.S. Higher Education System:  Lessons from the First Thirty Years (1958-1988)” in International and Language Education for a Global Future, eds. R. Glew and E. Wiley Michigan State University Press.  Her doctorate is in higher education and public policy from the University of Massachusetts along with MS agricultural economics (Cornell) and a MPIA international affairs and BA Latin American Studies (University of Pittsburgh). She was a National Defense Foreign Language grantee (precursor to the T6 FLAS) for Quechua language and Andean Studies at Pitt. At Yale, she supports the current T6 grants, 5NRC and 3 FLAS.  In addition to teaching at Yale, Columbia and the University of Connecticut, she has worked as an overseas development, strategic management consultant and also as a management trainer and researcher in Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Chile, Ghana, Pakistan, Portugal and Thailand. She began her career as a foreign service officer with the U.S. Agency for International Development in La Paz, Bolivia.

Wolfgang Schlör, Associate Provost, Western Michigan University

Wolfgang Schlör is the Associate Provost for the Diether H. Haenicke Institute for Global Education at Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Previously, he served as the Interim Associate Provost for International Affairs and Interim Director of International Programs and Studies (IPS) as well as Associate Director of IPS at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He also served as the Interim Director of the University Center for International Studies (UCIS) at the University of Pittsburgh, as well as Associate Director and Assistant Director for Academic Affairs of UCIS. Schlör has held research and postdoctoral appointments at the Center for Science and International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London; and the Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. From 1994 to 1996, he served as the US Director of the International Affairs Network, a major project to develop international affairs training capacity in Central and Eastern Europe, based in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. Schlör holds PhD (Dr.Phil.) and M.A. (Dipl.Pol.) degrees in Political Science from the Freie Universität Berlin.

Silke Scholz,  Product Specialist, Hexagon Metrology, Inc.

Silke Scholz is Product Specialist at Hexagon Metrology, Inc. Besides her involvement in product management responsibilities for national and international markets, she was appointed as the company’s Customer Ambassador for any visitors from near or far. This role includes preparing the teams for international customers.  Silke Scholz has a broad international background which started growing up part of her childhood in Ecuador and included extensive travelling, international exchange programs, times of study and work abroad. She speaks three languages – German, English, and Spanish - fluently. She believes in cross-cultural intelligence and synergy and raises her children in a trilingual atmosphere. She is an Adjunct Faculty Member at the College of Business of Johnson & Wales University teaching courses in International Business Management and International Culture and Protocol. Silke Scholz earned an MBA in Global Business from Johnson & Wales University.

Susan Sutton, Senior Advisor for Internationalization, Bryn Mawr College

Susan Buck Sutton is Senior Advisor for International Initiatives, Bryn Mawr College, and Emerita Associate Vice President of International Affairs and Chancellor’s Professor of Anthropology, Indiana University. During her three decades at IU, Sutton guided the internationalization of its urban campus – Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) – through a philosophy of strategic international partnerships and global learning for all that garnered the Simon Award from NAFSA and the Heiskell Award from IIE. Now returned to her undergraduate alma mater, she continues to build institutional partnerships and is guiding campus conversations concerning the mission of a women’s liberal arts college in the globalized 21st century. Sutton is past President of the Association of International Education Administrators, Chair of the Advisory Board for the Internationalization Collaborative of the American Council of Education, past chair of the International Education Leadership unit of NAFSA, and active with the Center for International Academic Partnerships of IIE.    Sutton has published five books and 60+ articles.

Julie Sykes, Director, Center for Applied Second Language Studies, University of Oregon

Julie Sykes received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota with a focus on applied linguistics and second language acquisition. She is currently the Director of the Center for Applied Second Language Studies. Julie’s research focuses on the use of digital technologies for language acquisition with a specific focus on inter-language pragmatic development and intercultural competence. She has taught courses on second language teaching and learning methodology and research, language learning and technology, Hispanic linguistics, and inter-language pragmatic development. In addition, she has supervised large language programs. Julie's experience includes the design, implementation, and evaluation of online immersive spaces and the creation of place-based, augmented reality mobile games to engage language learners in a variety of non-institutional contexts. She has published various articles technology-related topics, including synchronous computer-mediated communication and pragmatic development, digital games, and lexical acquisition in digitally mediated environments. Julie also holds a faculty appointment in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon.

Michael Tierney, Director, Institute for the Theory and Practice of International Relations, College of William & Mary

Michael Tierney is the Hylton Associate Professor of Government, Director of William and Mary's International Relations Program, Director of the Institute for the Theory and Practice of International Relations, and the Director of the AidData Center for Development Policy.  Professor Tierney received a B.A. from William & Mary in 1987, and a Ph.D. from the University of California at San Diego in 2003.  He teaches courses on international relations, international organization, and research methods. He has published two books: Greening Aid? Understanding the Environmental Impact of Development Assistance, Oxford University Press, 2008; Delegation and Agency in International Organizations, Cambridge University Press, 2006. Professor Tierney has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals and his research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Gates Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Tierney’s currently research explores the impact of Chinese foreign aid on outcomes in developing countries, and a book that explores the relationship between International Relations as a scholarly discipline and IR as lived by practitioners.

Sara West Tully, Executive Director, Center for International Education, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

Sara West Tully is Executive Director of the Center for International Education, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s comprehensive international programs office.  She serves as senior advisor to the Vice Provost for International Education and oversees the Center’s daily operations and strategic planning efforts as well as teams of staff responsible for interdisciplinary academic, co-curricular and research support program development and administration; international agreements and visitor programs; and development efforts. Sara spent her early career as a US Department of Education program officer for Title VI National Resource Centers, FLAS Fellowships, and Language Resource Centers programs. She earned her MA in German and European Studies and her BSFS in European History and Diplomacy from Georgetown University.

Brian Whalen, President and CEO, The Forum on Education Abroad

Brian Whalen is the President and CEO of the Forum on Education Abroad, the U.S. higher education association for education abroad.  The Forum has over 650 institutional members and is recognized by the U.S. Department of Justice as the Standards Development Organization for education abroad.  Until 2010 Brian was also Associate Provost, Associate Professor of International Studies and Executive Director of the Office of Global Education at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where the Forum continues to be housed.  A well-known international educator, Brian writes and speaks on a wide range of international education topics and serves on a number of boards, including the Advisory Board of the National Science Foundation Partnership for International Research and Education.  Brian is the founding editor of Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, started in 1994 as the first academic journal devoted to study abroad, and he continues to serve as its editor and publisher.  For five years he was an on-site resident director of study abroad programs in Italy, and he has developed and overseen programs in over 40 countries.  Brian holds B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology.

Margaret Wiedenhoeft, Associate Director of International Programs, Kalamazoo College

Margaret Wiedenhoeft is the Associate Director of the Center for International Programs at Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Currently she manages the Kalamazoo study abroad programs in Europe and Asia. Margaret received her B.A. in International Studies from Emory University her M.B.A. and doctorate from Western Michigan University. Professional interests include promoting diversity in study abroad participation, developing international service-learning projects, and studying the impact and experience of study abroad on U.S. college students. Margaret is a member of the Forum Council of the Forum on Education Abroad and has presented at numerous conferences on topics ranging from assessment of students on study abroad, ethics and international education, and managing the education abroad office.

Cynthia Williams, Director of External Relations, Division of International Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Cynthia Williams is Director of External Relations for the Division of International Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her role includes policy and research analysis and designing and implementing strategies to meet the goals outlined in the campus strategic plan for international studies. She serves as the campus coordinator for international cooperation agreements, and directs the Washington, D.C. Semester in International Affairs. Dr. Williams received her Ph.D. in Development Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interests are focused on NGOs in international development, and global higher education. 

Suzanne H. Young, Associate Director for Language, Education & Research, Center for Language Study, Yale University

Suzanne Young is the Associate Director of Yale’s Center for Language Study.  At the CLS, she oversees tutoring and language study programs for students, and runs workshops and training sessions on language pedagogy and technology-enhanced teaching for language faculty and graduate students. As part of the team responsible for Yale’s Shared Course Initiative, she has developed an interest in the different ways that technology can enhance teaching, both online and in the f2f classroom. She earned her Ph.D. in English and American Literature from the University of Virginia, and has taught ESL writers at Harvard and Yale.  Suzanne also teaches a summer course in Paris on “Paris in the ‘20s,” which focuses on transatlantic modernist artists.  Her research interests include second language writing, modernist literature, digital humanities, and online learning.