Branch Out Reorientation Grants

About the Grants

The vision of Branch Out alternative breaks is to create a community of active and educated members of society dedicated to the pursuit of social justice. 

The purpose of Branch Out Reorientation Grants is to support students who have been involved in a Branch Out alternative break and want to deepen their alternative break experience by connecting to local issues after their break trip.  In the process, Reorientation Grants will help develop students as active citizens and support communities locally and elsewhere in the US in achieving their own goals.

Reorientation Grants support student-designed projects, expenses incurred during full-time volunteer service and internships in collaboration with a community partner (nonprofit, public agency or other community-based organization). 

Students may apply for grants as individuals or as groups.  Some alternative break teams may choose to apply for funding together.  Because social change happens most effectively when people work together, we prioritize group projects (even if just one member was a former breaker).  

Projects may take place during the school year, school breaks, or both.  Funding may support up to a year of community engagement.  Students may request any amount up to $1000 for each project.

Applications are accepted year round, on a rolling basis.

Funds may be used for the following purposes:

  • supplies and project needs
  • for travel costs during local volunteering
  • to defray living expenses while volunteering full-time

Preference is given to applications that indicate that grant funds will go directly to the community or project.  International projects will not be funded.

Awards are made by a selection committee composed of Branch Out Student leaders, and other students, staff and faculty deeply involved in community engagement.

Funds are provided through the generosity of Students Serve, which provides funding for college and graduate students to implement service projects, or what they call “serviceships,” in their communities.