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About the Making Reform Incentives Work Project


Who is conducting the Making Reform Incentives Work project?
What is the purpose of the Making Reform Incentives Work project?
Who is sponsoring the Making Reform Incentives Work project?


About the Reform Efforts Survey

Why did you select me to participate in the Reform Efforts Survey?
How did you find my email?
Who is administering this survey?
Who will use the data collected in this survey?
Who will be able to see my responses?
How will this impact development in my country?
Do you offer a printable or paper copy of the survey questionnaire?
Can I use my smartphone?


About the Making Reform Incentives Work Project


Who is conducting the Making Reform Incentives Work project?

The Institute for the Theory &  Practice of International Relations (ITPIR) is an independent research institution at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia (USA). ITPIR produces policy-relevant, innovative, and methodologically sophisticated social science research that speaks to contemporary international problems and issues. ITPIR has an established track record of administering large research projects and administering high-quality, cross-national surveys, including a biennial survey of international relations faculty, which is regularly featured in Foreign Policy magazine. You can find more information about ITPIR at http://www.wm.edu/offices/itpir/.

ITPIR’s research activities are funded by the College of William and Mary and a variety of external sponsors, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the John Templeton Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Humanity United, and the National Science Foundation.

What is the purpose of the Making Reform Incentives Work project?

The purpose of this research project is to learn how development partners can better support the reform efforts of governments in 126 low income and lower-middle income countries. A full list of these countries can be found here. This study is not an evaluation of any past or present development programs or projects. We hope that our research findings will contribute to a better understanding of how donor agencies and international organizations can more effectively support developing country reform efforts.

Who is sponsoring the Making Reform Incentives Work project?

The sponsors of this project include the College of William and Mary, the London School of Economics and Political Science, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the John Templeton Foundation.


About the Reform Efforts Survey


Why did you select me to participate in the Reform Efforts Survey?

You have been selected to participate in this study because you held a position at some point between 2004 and 2013 that we believe makes you knowledgeable about the design and implementation of policies and programs in your specified country.

Your participation is essential to ensure that our survey results accurately represent the diverse experiences and viewpoints of important stakeholders in your country.

How did you find my email?

We identified the contact information of potential survey respondents using publicly available resources, such as organizational websites and directories, international conference records, Who’s Who International, and public profiles on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

Who is administering this survey?

This survey is being implemented and hosted by the independent research organization NORC at the University of Chicago. You can find information about NORC at http://www.norc.org. The Institute for the Theory & Practice of International Relations (ITPIR) has hired NORC in order to benefit from its extensive experience fielding large-scale and complex quantitative surveys in multiple languages and country contexts.

NORC has been contracted to develop the online survey web tool, conduct initial survey outreach, and collect and clean the survey data. In all contracted work, NORC is following explicit directions from ITPIR’s research team. NORC does not and will not have ownership of the survey or sample data and will only clean, collect, and analyze survey data as requested by ITPIR’s research team.

Who will use the data collected in this survey?

Independent analysis of survey results will be conducted and published by researchers from the College of William and Mary, the London School of Economics and Political Science, the Center for Global Development, and Harvard University.

The results from this survey will also be shared with donor agencies, international organizations, and key decision-makers and stakeholders in 126 low income and lower-middle income countries.

Who will be able to see my responses?

Rest assured that all of your responses to this survey will be kept strictly confidential. The survey findings will only be used in a statistical summary and will never be associated with your name.

Strictly confidential means that only members of the research team at The College of William and Mary and NORC, as needed, will be able to identify your individual responses at any point in the data collection, cleaning, analysis, or publication process.

In the event that members of our research team at the College of William and Mary or NORC engage in collaborative research activities with a third party, individual survey response data will be shared only as needed. All name, email, organization, position, and other personally-identifiable information will be removed.

How will this impact development in my country?

Independent researchers will use the results from the survey to undertake analysis of how donor agencies and international organizations can increase the impact of the support that they provide to their developing country partners.

The results from this survey will be shared with key decision-makers and stakeholders in your country. We also intend to share our research findings with a wide range of donor agencies and international organizations that work in your country.

Do you offer a printable or paper copy of the survey questionnaire?

Our survey has been programmed to meet the needs of over 30,000 study participants. This diverse group of carefully selected individuals represent 126 countries, 24 professional specializations, and 5 stakeholder groups, including host country governments, development partners, civil society, the private sector, and independent country experts. Given the diversity of our survey recipients’ professional experiences, the survey requires the use of an active and responsive online questionnaire. A traditional paper questionnaire is unable to meet our most basic programming needs. For this reason, we can provide only an online questionnaire, and we encourage you to complete the survey via the link provided in the email you received. Further questions about questionnaire access or technical difficulties can be addressed to reformincentives@wm.edu.

Can I use my smartphone?

This survey is formatted for use on a large screen. For this reason, we recommend that you do not use a smartphone or other handheld mobile device. While it is possible to complete the survey on a small screen, we believe your experience will be more enjoyable on a computer or full size tablet (e.g., a regular iPad).