Summer 2015 Course List & Descriptions


Registration Now Open at my.wm.edu

Session 1
June 1 - July 3

CRWR 212: Introduction to Creative Writing (GER 6)

In this course, students will be introduced to craft of writing fiction, poetry, and drama. Through readings and class discussions, students will learn the basics of contemporary techniques in these fields. Then, with weekly writing assignments and in-class workshops, students will put these techniques into practice. They will complete a short story and several smaller writing assignments during the session.


KINE 350:  The Science of Nutrition (GER2b) -- New -- Held in Ballston, VA at Northern VA Community College Arlington Center

An introductory course which begins with the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal system. Individual nutrients will be discussed and there will be in-depth treatment of life cycle nutrition issues. Guest speakers will supplement lectures relative to nutrition research and public policy. 


KINE 352: Nutrition and the Brain - The Psychology of Eating and Drinking (GER2b, GER 3, Neuroscience Behavioral Elective) -- New -- Held in Ballston, VA at Northern VA Community College Arlington Center

Although the science of nutrition and brain function is relatively new and is still evolving, certain nutrients in foods are known to be essential to human brain function. Through exploration of past and current research in the area of nutrition science, students will be exposed to the development of the body of literature exploring the effects of various nutrients found in food and how these nutrients affect the brain and subsequent behavior.  


Arab 311/AMES 290: The Arab American Experience (GER 4c and 7)

This course looks at the Arab experience in America. The course will be divided between the street and the classroom. In class, we explore the experience of Arab immigrants in the United States since the beginning of the 20th century. We will investigate a variety of material including fiction, autobiography, and film (in English or translation), which will reflect Arab cultural engagement with North America, the process of assimilation, and also the racial histories of a number of different waves of immigrants. We will also research contemporary issues in the Arab American community including issues of gender, Islamophobia and racial profiling. This academic work will be the backdrop for our excursions into the Washington community and political culture. Namely, we will have meetings with prominent civil rights and government institutions and figures. 


Arab 311/AMES 290: Israel and Palestine: A Washington DC Dialogue  (GER 4b)

This course will investigate ways in which members of the community understand the history of the Palestine-Israel conflict. Exploring cultural production, literature, film, documentary, autobiography, poetry and spoken word and music,  along with secondary studies, we will explore ways in which Palestine-Israel have experienced dialogue and precedents important for forging a co-created future for Palestinian Israelis, Jewish Israelis, Palestinians under occupation, and Israelis and Palestinians abroad. Students will also learn from Israeli and Arab voices from the Washington DC area and listen to the experience and future for Palestine-Israel of thinkers, activists, artists, and political figures from within Washington DC who will visit the class.


INRL 391: Foreign Policy Decision-Making

  • 1 credit
  • F 4:00-5:50pm   CRN: 30310
  • Adjunct Professor Gabriel Swiney: Gabriel Swiney is an international lawyer with experience in a wide range of foreign policy issues.  Mr. Swiney holds law degrees from Harvard and Oxford, and is an attorney for the U.S. Department of State.

Foreign Policy Decision-Making is taught by a practicing international lawyer for the U.S. Department of State. The course examines the real-life choices that policymakers face when designing and implenting U.S. policy, and provides a unique view into how those decisions are made. The class will visit the Department of State, where students will meet with members of the foreign service and other officials. The course is ideal for any students considering a career in diplomacy or international relations, or anyone interested in how the U.S. government operates.


SOCL 312/GSWS 312/AMES 290: Gender and Sexuality in Muslim Cultures (GER 4b) (Cross-listed with GSWS 312-01, Fulfills the Social Science requirement for the GSWS major/minor)

In this course we comparatively examine some Muslim-majority societies (Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, Syria, Turkey, Iranian Diaspora, and the historical examples from the city of Aleppo, and Ottoman & Istanbul in the eighteenth century) by focusing on cultural formations and practices of gender and sexuality in everyday life and in institutional arrangements. The course draws together materials from Sociology, History, Politics, Anthropology, and Cultural Studies to explore Muslim identities and their historical and contemporary transformations through the lens of gender and sexuality.


RELG 212: Introduction to Islam (GER4b)

This course examines the origins, historical evolution, extraordinary diversity, core theological principles, and key modern developments of the Islamic faith.  The class directly confronts many of the currently prevailing stereotypes and misconceptions surrounding the Islamic faith today, questioning, assessing, and in some cases debunking, their veracity.  Among other topics, the class examines the Sunni-Shia divide, the mystical branch of Islam known as Sufism, and the status of women in Islam.   


GOVT 305: Contemporary Political Theory

  • 3 Credits
  • M-Th, 7:00-8:50pm   CRN: 30515
  • Adjunct Professor Jacquie Pfeffer Merrill

Students will read major texts by nineteenth and twentieth century philosophers—including Friedrich Nietzsche, J.S. Mill, Max Weber, and John Rawls—whose works are intellectual sources for important strands of contemporary political debates today. They will read these exciting texts closely and examine how the ideas advanced by these philosophers inform today’s public policy debates.



Session 2
July 6 - August 7

ART 211: Drawing and Color (GER 6)

  • 3 Credits
  • M-Th, 5:00-6:50pm   CRN: 30345
  • Adjunct Professor Brian Kelley

Students will explore the fundamentals of two-dimensional art using the landscape and museums of Washington, D.C. as a classroom. The class will meet at specific locations around the Capitol Mall (i.e. The National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Natural History, or the Capitol Mall Park itself), in which core two-dimensional art concepts such as Line, Value, and Color will be investigated. Course information will be delivered in the form of lectures, demonstrations, and short supplemental readings. There are no prerequisites. As this course is introductory in nature, no previous drawing or painting experience is needed.


RELG 212: Introduction to Islam (GER4b)

This course examines the origins, historical evolution, extraordinary diversity, core theological principles, and key modern developments of the Islamic faith.  The class directly confronts many of the currently prevailing stereotypes and misconceptions surrounding the Islamic faith today, questioning, assessing, and in some cases debunking, their veracity.  Among other topics, the class examines the Sunni-Shia divide, the mystical branch of Islam known as Sufism, and the status of women in Islam.  


GOVT 391: Insurgency and Terrorism

This course examines the complexities of insurgency and terrorism from the ancient world through today, while shedding light on the rising problem of radicalization and politically motivated violence. A variety of disciplines will be discussed in this course, including primarily political science, but also: terrorism and war studies; various elements of psychology (as relevant); and, radicalization. This course will pose a wide range of questions to challenge students to better understand how acts of terrorism occur, as well as provide a strong foundation for subsequent studies and research. This is not a linear course, but rather “Topics in Government.”

 


GOVT 390: Approaches to US National Security

The course examines the evolution of US national security, as well as the challenges faced today. Approaches to US National Security will be divided into five parts. First, we will examine the conceptual framework of the various components of US National Security, as well as our roots and principles that helped define our interests. Then, we will discuss the trans-formative elements of the Pre-Cold War period. For class three, we will transition through the Cold War and into the Post-Cold War period. Class Four will dissect non-traditional threats and challenges for US National Security. The final class will reflect on Grand Strategy, and where US National Security is heading.