Williamsburg

HistoryHistoric Triangle Map 

Learning Odysseys at The College of William & Mary is located in the historic city of Williamsburg, capital of colonial Virginia and home of The College of William & Mary. Williamsburg is located 150 miles south of Washington, D.C., midway between Richmond and Norfolk on I-64.

Williamsburg is a delightful, small city (population 15,000) in the Tidewater area of Virginia. Situated between the James and York rivers, Williamsburg is an ideal location from which to visit a host of historic sites: Colonial Williamsburg, the world-famous restored 18th-century capital of Virginia; Jamestown, site of the first permanent English settlement in the New World; and Yorktown, where George Washington's victory secured American independence. (Williamsburg, Jamestown, and Yorktown comprise what is known as the "Historic Triangle.") Contemporary attractions like Busch Gardens, Water Country, and a multitude of shopping venues give the area wide appeal.

In 2007, the Historic Triangle area of Virginia focused on the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown. Check out our Jamestown programs on the Road Scholar Programs page!

The College of William & Mary
Wren Building

The College of William & Mary in Virginia, founded in 1693, is the second oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. Over the past three centuries the College has distinguished itself as the "Alma Mater of a Nation," producing four Presidents, sixteen members of the Continental Congress, four signers of the Declaration of Independence, and four justices of the Supreme Court.

Originally the College consisted of three buildings: the Main, or Sir Christopher Wren, Building (shown in an aerial view); the Brafferton; and the President's House. These structures, which form a triangle in the College yard, have been restored to their original 18th-century appearance through the combined efforts of the College, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

Today the College is a moderately-sized, residential, state university. Considered a "Public Ivy," it is among the most selective public universities in the United States. William & Mary draws two-thirds of its 5,700 undergraduates from the Commonwealth of Virginia, although all 50 states and 72 foreign countries are also represented in the student body. The highly regarded Schools of Law, Business, Education, and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science augment the College's offerings and enroll an additional 2,000 graduate students.