Weaver fund hits $30,000

  • The Weaver familyMembers of Todd Weaver's family gathered at W&M's baseball game last week against Longwood. In the upper left corner are Todd's parents, Donn and Jeanne.

    courtesy of Tribe athletics

    The Weaver family
  • Weaver and WittmanTodd Weaver's father Donn (left) and brother Glenn were joined at the Tribe's baseball game against Longwood by Congressman Rob Wittman (center), recently named the College's Hunter B. Andrews Fellow for 2011.

    courtesy of Tribe athletics

    Weaver and Wittman
  • The spirit is spreadingErika Oldenkamp-Malik '07, who is playing on the LPGA's Futures Tour, sports a "One Tribe. One Family" wristband in honor of the late Todd Weaver '08.

    courtesy Erika Malik

    The spirit is spreading
The fund in memory of Todd Weaver ’08, who was killed in Afghanistan in September 2010, has reached approximately $30,000, with donations still coming in.

Much of that total for Weaver, an Army 1st Lieutenant, has come from the sale of wristbands sporting the logo “One Tribe. One Family.” That campaign originated with the College’s Student Athletic Advisory Council last November, and continued last week at W&M’s home baseball game against Longwood.

At $3 piece, the SAAC has raised approximately $18,000, and the campaign continues.

Recently, many athletic teams sent emails to their alumni databases seeking support. In addition, a recent story on the campaign appeared in W&M’s Alumni magazine.

The combination of the two, says SAAC’s Brandon Heroux, has resulted in about 20 orders per day recently, many filed through the ‘One Tribe’ website: http://onetribeonefamily.com.

“We are really motivated to see this project through to the fullest,” said Heroux ’12. “We will be selling them at the spring football game (Saturday, 1:30 p.m.) and around campus during the last week of classes.”

The goal is to raise $50,000 by October 2011. During his time at William & Mary, Weaver was a government major who had a tremendous affinity for world travel. In his life, he journeyed through five continents and lived in six different countries.

To honor his memory in a way consistent with his interests, his family seeks to create a scholarship that will be given to help fund a semester abroad for a William & Mary student who plans on pursuing a career in government or public service.

In addition, there is a secondary purpose: to unite past, present, and future William & Mary students and supporters in a meaningful way under the mantra of “One Tribe. One Family.”