William & Mary admits diverse class for 2014

  • Welcome to W&MThe Class of 2014 figures to be one of the College's most diverse and academically accomplished ever. The group of admitted students comes from the largest undergraduate applicant pool in the College's history. Here, members of last year's freshman class are welcomed to the College during Opening Convocation.

    Photo by Stephen Salpukas

    Welcome to W&M
It has been another record-setting year in admissions at the nation's second oldest institution of higher education.

The College of William and Mary mailed acceptance letters recently to 3,729 students in anticipation of enrolling a freshman class of 1,400 in the fall. The Class of 2014 figures to be one of the College's most diverse and academically accomplished ever. The group of admitted students comes from the largest undergraduate applicant pool in the College's history. William & Mary received more than 12,500 undergraduate applicants, a record number for the fifth year in a row.

"This is a tremendous group of students," Henry Broaddus, dean of admission, said. "They come with sterling academic credentials, diverse backgrounds and a wide array of talents and experiences that will make them wonderful additions to this community."

Admission staff have spent the past several months reading each of the applications in shaping this year's group of admitted students. Broaddus shared a few highlights of this year's group of admitted students:

  • 31.8 percent of the admitted students are students of color. This is an increase from 26. 3 percent from last year's group admitted students and represents the most racially diverse group of students ever admitted to the College, Broaddus said.
  • Average combined critical reading and math SAT scores increased 15 points from last year's group of admitted students.
  • The admit rate (29.8 percent) is the lowest at the College in more than 20 years.
  • 88.4 percent of admitted students who received a high-school rank finished in the top 10 percent of their graduating class. Broaddus noted that only 41 percent of admitted students attend a high school that reports class rank.
Broaddus also added that he expects next year's incoming class will enable the university to maintain its total in-state undergraduate ratio of 65 percent. Many of those admitted students will be in town this weekend as part of Saturday's Admitted Students Day.

Thousands of students and their families will visit campus, take part in activities to introduce them to campus and meet and congregate with current students, faculty, staff and administrators.

"We want to welcome these students to the William & Mary family and give them an opportunity to experience a slice of this unique educational experience," said Earl Granger, associate provost for enrollment. "We're thrilled with the potential we see in next year's class. It will be one of our strongest ever."