Campus COLL 300: Visitors

Among the criteria adopted for the Campus COLL 300: "bring the world to W&M" through instructional content and significant involvement of students and faculty with COLL 300 campus visitors - a fruitful experience of disorientation that allows students to see their own lives in broader perspective.

In a typical semester the CLA supports campus COLL 300 courses by hosting three campus visitors related to that semester's theme. Each visitor presents a public event and engages smaller groups of students and faculty in ways that support the goals of COLL 300. Visits generally span several or more days.

Each visitor's public event parallels the semester's theme and stems from some aspect of their life other than scholarly expertise. This may take the form of readings, conversations, performances, presentations of general and scholarly interest, or some combination of all of these – or something entirely different. 

Visitors for Spring 2018
  • Zena Howard is one of the few female African-American architects in the United States and was part of the team that designed the National Museum of African American History and Culture, in Washington, DC. During her visit she will share her philosophy that "designers have a social responsibility to improve the lives of community members" and describe how this philosophy shapes her work. February 25 to March 1; main event on Wednesday, February 28, 5:00 pm.
  • Vandana Shiva trained as a physicist at the University of Punjab and later shifted to interdisciplinary research in science, technology, and environmental policy. She has campaigned internationally on issues surrounding biotechnology and genetic engineering, and has contributed in fundamental ways to changing the practice and paradigms of agriculture and food. April 16-20; main event on Wednesday, April 18, at 5:00 pm.
  • RDK (Doug) Herman combines his backgrounds in Comparative Religion and Cultural Geography to explore Indigenous knowledge and what it teaches humanity about how to live on planet Earth. He created Pacific Worlds, a web-based indigenous-geography project for the American Pacific. In 2013 Doug built his own outrigger sailing canoe.  He has sailed short trips on two Hawaiian voyaging canoes, Hōkūleʻa andHikianalia, and publishes and lectures on traditional Oceanic navigation and canoe-building. 
Visitors for Fall 2018: "Bodies that Matter"

We are in the process of negotiating dates with the selected speakers. Faculty interested in developing a course should contact the CLA Associate Director, Ben Boone [biboon@wm.edu] for speaker names and topics.

Visitors for Spring 2019: "Ceremony"

We are in the process of negotiating dates with the selected speakers. Faculty interested in developing a course should contact the CLA Associate Director, Ben Boone [biboon@wm.edu] for speaker names and topics.

Past Visitors