William & Mary

Schroeder Center welcomes Michael Daly

The Schroeder Center for Health Policy is pleased to welcome Michael Daly as its newest Research Associate.  Daly graduated from the University of Cape Town in 2012 where he earned, with honors, a Bachelor of Commerce degree in economics.  He is currently completing his Master of Commerce degree in economic development at the same university.  In early 2014, Daly was a graduate exchange student in economics at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

Daly’s previous work included projects with the University of Witwatersrand’s School of Public Health, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, and the Economic Policy Research Institute (EPRI).  His research focused on the advertising of sugar sweetened beverages, an assessment of the impact of social security payments, the economics of alcohol consumption, and an analysis of AC Nielsen advertising data. 

Daly is co-author on two World Health Organization commissioned reports, one on alcohol advertising trends and the other on the prevalence of drinking in South Africa.  In addition, Daly co-authored a forthcoming article on “Zimbabwe’s Monetary Policy 1998-2012:  From Hyperinflation to Dollarization” to be published in Zimbabwe Hyperinflation Experience edited by the Macroeconomic and Financial Management Institute of Southern Africa.

Daly’s responsibilities at the Schroeder Center include providing data analysis and programming support to Center-affiliated faculty.  His current research projects include identifying Medicaid and Medicare beneficiaries who experienced ambulatory care sensitive hospital admissions.  In addition, he is examining the geographic distribution and characteristics of physicians in Virginia and how these affect the Commonwealth’s provision of health care.

The Schroeder Center provides timely policy information and rigorous, unbiased analysis of health and healthcare problems to policymakers, educators, and students.  Daly’s addition to the Schroeder Center staff increases the Center’s ability to expand its research and fulfill its mission.