William & Mary

William & Mary renovates Tyler Hall

  • John Tyler Hall
    John Tyler Hall  Students walk about the front of the newly renovated John Tyler Hall. The renovation took several years from initial planning in 2009 to actual completion in 2016 and cost more than $16 million.  Photo by Stephen Salpukas
  • John Tyler Hall
    John Tyler Hall  Students of William & Mary study in the new lobby of the renovated John Tyler Hall. The renovation took several years since it was initially planned in 2009 to actual completion in 2016 and cost over $16 million.  Photo by Stephen Salpukas
  • John Tyler Hall
    John Tyler Hall  A faculty member works at her desk in the newly renovated John Tyler Hall. The renovation took several years since it was initially planned in 2009 to actual completion in 2016 and cost over $16 million.  Photo by Stephen Salpukas
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William & Mary students taking classes in economics, government, international relations and public policy this fall will enjoy updated classrooms and new technology in the recently renovated John Tyler Hall.  

Wayne Boy, director of university’s project management office stated that the originally 36,250 square foot building was increased in overall interior size to about 43,200 square feet by converting the fourth floor attic space into office space. The building also now employs a more cost-effective source of energy with a connection to the central plant and an update to the information technology infrastructure.

“The project was a great success,” said Boy. “For example, the team did a phenomenal job of converting the attic into usable space, installing a more flexible IT infrastructure to adapt to constantly evolving technology and incorporating sustainability as exemplified by water-saving features such as low-flow lavatories which will save 40 percent in water expenditures per year."

Faculty, students and alumni of the school will celebrate the opening of the building during Homecoming Weekend at a brunch held on Oct. 15, said John McGlennon, a professor of government and public policy at the university.

“We have said for a long time that the move to Tyler should give us a facility to match the quality of our students and faculty,” said McGlennon. “This building does not disappoint.  It has already reinvigorated the departments and programs housed there even as the finishing touches are being applied.”

In 2009, William & Mary commissioned Mitchell/Matthews Architects to prepare a study to determine whether or not it would be feasible to house economics, government and the programs of international relations and public policy in one building. After ideas were exchanged and agreed upon, the project began in the fall of 2014. The complete cost for the project is $16.3 million in state and private funds.

“This building represents a new model for the College,” said McGlennon. “We’re grateful to everyone involved all the way from the design team to the donors who generously provided funds to the construction workers who tirelessly made this happen.”