German Studies Courses

Please Note: Not all courses are taught every year. Please consult the online schedule for the most current information on courses offered in German Studies.

 

101. Elementary German I.

Fall (4) Corequisite: GER 101D.
Training in grammar, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Three hours in the Master Class, two hours in the drill class and two sessions in the language laboratory.

102. Elementary German II.

Spring (4) Corequisite: GER 102D.
Training in grammar, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Three hours in the Master Class, two hours in the drill class and two sessions in the language laboratory.

150. Freshman Seminar Topics.

Fall and Spring (3,3)
An exploration of a specific topic in literary or cultural studies. Readings, class discussions and writing assignments are in English. Normally open only to first-year students. 150 does not meet the freshman writing requirement.

150W. Freshman Seminar Topics.

Fall and Spring (4,4)
An exploration of a specific topic in literary or cultural studies. Readings, class discussions and writing assignments are in English. Normally open only to first-year students. 150W meets the freshman writing requirement.

Topic for Fall 2013: Responses to the Holocaust. Leventhal.

201. Intermediate German I.

Fall (4) Prerequisite: GER 102 or equivalent. Corequisite: GER 201D.
 Training in grammar, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Three hours in the Master Class, one hour in the drill class, and an hour of advanced conversation or the German film of the week.

202. Intermediate German II.

Spring (3) Prerequisite: GER 201 or equivalent.
Readings of German cultural and literary texts. Training in pronunciation, speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing. Three hours in the Master Class and one hour of advanced conversation with the German House tutor or the German film of the week.

203. Intensive Accelerated German.

Fall 2013 (4) Gully.
An intensive, acclerated course that combines 201 and 202 in one semester. For highly motivated students who have completed 102 or legacy/heritage speakers. Fulfills the Foreign Language Requirement.

204. Preparation for Summer Study Abroad.

Spring 2014 (1) Corney. Required for all students participating in the Potsdam Summer Study Aborad Program.

205. Reading German Children's Literature: Intensive Reading and Grammar Review

Fall (3) Morrison. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent.
An intensive reading and grammar course focusing on canonical children's books including texts by the Grimms, Kaestner, Ende and others. Students will read several children's books, write short essays and give oral presentations.

206. Upper-lntermediate Conversation.

Fall (3) Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent.
A course beyond the College's foreign language requirement proficiency level stressing the cultural and linguistic notions of oral discourse in developing communicative ability in the language. Practice in simulated foreign cultural contexts through discussion and student presentations on themes in contemporary German life.

207. Introduction to German Cultural Studies

(GER 4a and 5) Spring 2011 (3). Campbell. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent.
Introduction to the methodologies of German Studies. This course will examine the construction of culture and the ways it is studied. It serves as an introduction to the concentration track in German Studies and as a prerequisite for 300-level courses.

210. Topics in German Language (Taught in German).

Fall or Spring (3)  Prerequisite: GER 205 or 206 or permission of instructor. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.

212. Business German.

Fall or Spring (3)  Prerequisite: GER 205 or 206 equivalent or permission of instructor.
This course provides students with advanced German language skills and the intercultural knowledge necessary to understand the world of commerce from the German perspective. Taught in German. 

220. Survey of German Cinema (Taught in English)

(GER 4A and GER 5) Spring (3) Taylor.
A chronological overview of the history of German cinema. Screenings outside of class. Lecture and discussion.

221. German Fairy Tales and National Identity (Taught in English)

(GER 4A and GER 5) Spring (3).
An examination of the role of German fairy tales in the development of national identity in 19th Century Germany. Lecture and discussion.

287.Topics in German (Taught in English)

Fall or Spring (3-4) Staff.
Students with German Language Proficiency may elect to add an additional credit-hour per week for reading and discussion in German. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.

Topics for Fall 2013:

Media and Politics 1945 to the Present (3-4) Wattenberg

German Cinema (3-4) Gully

306. Advanced German Conversation and Grammar Review

 Spring (3) Staff.
 Advanced conversation and grammar review in German. Course stresses oral discourse on themes relating to the contemporary German-speaking world. Includes review of selected problems in grammar and syntax.

307. The German Speaking Peoples and Their Civilization.

Fall (3) Campbell. Prerequisite: GER 206, 207 or 208. 
This course presents the most important elements of Germanic civilization and is designed as an introductory step to other 300-level courses. It includes illustrated lectures, readings, and films.

310. Advanced German Grammar and Stylistics

Fall or Spring (3) Leventhal. Prerequisite: GER 205 or 206 or 207 or permission of the instructor
An advanced language course for students who wish to deepen and further their competency in German. Difficult aspects of German syntax, semantics, and pragmatics will be covered. Advanced stylistics, levels of discourse, and methods of formulation will be practiced through close analysis of texts and content-based essay writing.

312. Modern German Critical Thought I: 1670-1830 (Taught in English)

Fall (GER 7) (3-4) Leventhal.  Cross-listed with LCST 351 and PHIL 306.
How did important 17th, 18th, and 19th century thinkers such as Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Lessing, Herder, Kant, Fichte, and Hegel construct the individual as a political and moral subject? We will follow four threads through each of these texts: the nature of the self or subject; morality, aesthetic value, freedom, and responsibility; the relationship between the individual, society, and the state; and the nature and function of historical understanding. This class examines important German philosophical texts, and texts which strongly influenced the German tradition 1670-1850, in order to address such questions and distinctions as the public vs. the private, the validity of moral and aesthetic judgement, the claims of interpretation, and the nature of political power. Students with advanced German may take this course for 4 credits by attending one extra hour of discussion in German per week.

313. Modern German Critical Thought II: 1830 to the Present(Taught in English)

Fall 2013 (GER 7) (3-4) Leventhal . Cross-listed with LCST 351 and PHIL 306.
How did important 19th and 20th century thinkers writing in German such as Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Husserl, Weber, Heidegger, Arendt, Adorno, and Habermas understand the construction of the self and how is the self a moral and political subject? We will follow four threads through each of these texts: 1) the nature of the self or subject; 2) morality, value, freedom, and responsibility; 3) the relationship between the individual, society, and the state; and 4) the nature and function of historical understanding. This class examines important German philosophical texts and currents in order to address such questions and distinctions as the validity of moral and aesthetic judgement, the claims of interpretation, the nature of political power and the individual's relation to political power. (German speakers may take this course for 4 credits by attending one extra hour of discussion in German per week).

320. Great Moments in German Literature

Spring 2014 (3)  Leventhal. Prerequisite: GER 205 or 206 or permission of instructor
Advanced training in grammar and composition through critical reading of selected prose fiction, drama, poetry and short essays in German. Fall 2006: Texts by Lessing, Goethe, Novalis, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Kleist, Buechner, Heine, Droste-Huelshoff, Hauptmann, Brecht, Kafka and Oezdamar.

333. Imagining Heimat: German Conceptions of Home

Spring (3)  Campbell. Prerequisite: GER 205 or 206 or permission of instructor
In this course we will read selected texts about or from the provinces of the German speaking world. Each instructor will organize the course around a question or topic relevant to provincial life in German speaking countries.

334. The German City

Fall or Spring (3)  Prerequisite: GER 205 or 206 or permission of instructor. Depending upon the instructor, either Berlin, Munich or Vienna will be used as a case study to explore the conflicts, tensions, crisis and dilemmas that emerged as a result of rapid urbanization in the spheres of literature, film, art, culture and politics.

335. Germans in Exile

Fall or Spring (3)  Prerequisite: GER 205 or 206 or permission of instructor
In this course we will read selected texts about or from German artists, politicians and thinkers who lived and worked in exile. Each instructor will organize the course around certain groups of exiles and/or specific questions raised by exile.

387. Topics in German Studies (Taught in English)

Fall (3-4) Staff. Students with German Language Proficiency may elect to add an additional credit-hour per week for reading and discussion in German. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.

Topic for Fall 2013: Media and Modernity (3-4) Campbell.

Topic for Spring 2014: The Modern City: Germany and Japan 1880-1950 (3-4) Leventhal (with Michael Cronin, Japanese).

390. Topics in German Studies (Taught in German)

(AS) Fall or Spring (3)
Topic will be indicated in the schedule of classes. May be repeated for credit if topic differs.

408. Senior Seminar in German Studies.

Spring 2011 (3) Staff. Prerequisite: German 207 and 307.
Provides a capstone experience for the German Studies concentration. Organized around topics which will change each semester, this course requires students to apply the tools of German Studies to an independent research project.

410. Special Topics in German Literature.

Fall or Spring (3) Prerequisite: One 300-level course in German literature or culture.
An in-depth study of a limited topic in German literature or in the relationship between literature and other disciplines. Course may be repeated for credit when topics differ.

411. Independent Study.

Fall or Spring (var.) Prerequisite or corequisite: two other 400-level German courses
This course is designed to permit an in-depth study in an area of literature not available in current course offerings. A written petition to the instructor and approval of the Coordinator for German are required before registration. Course may be repeated for credit if topic varies.

412. German Studies Teaching Practicum.

Fall and Spring, 1 credit, MDLL faculty, Instructor Permission Required
A mentored teaching internship experience for students to work closely with a faculty member in teaching either a language or content course.

417. German Detective Fiction.

Spring (3) Campbell. Prerequisite: A GER 300-level class or permission of instructor
This is an advanced seminar that investigates both the theory and the genre of detective fiction in the German-speaking world and exposes the student to specific practices and methodologies of German Studies. Auithors to be discussed include Duerrenmatt, Arjouni, GHercke, Ruester, Hettche, Kienast and others.

420. The Enlightenment in Germany

Spring (3) Leventhal. Prerequisite: A GER 300-level class or permission of instructor
The German Enlightenment in social, political, cultural, and European context. Discussion of the emergence and dissemination of Enlightenment in Germany, the public sphere, the new media and loci of modernity. Texts to be discussed include Thomasius, Wolff, Brockes, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Nicolai, Kant. More recent theoretical approaches to the Enlightenment, its signficance and reception-history, will be examined with texts by Koselleck, Habermas, and Foucault.

421. The Turn of the Century: Vienna and Berlin

Fall or Spring (3) Prerequisite: A GER 300-level class or permission of instructor
An investigation of Berlin and Vienna at the turn of the 19th century, with a focus on the notion of the modern. Readings of literary texts, dramas, art movements and scientific/ philosphical movements.

422. The Weimar Republic

Fall (3) Campbell. Prerequisite: A GER 300-level class or permission of instructor
What was the Weimar Republic, and why did it ultimately fail? This course offers a close look at Germany in the 1920's through reading the works of writers, artists, journalists and filmmakers from the only German republic before Nazism.

423. The GDR and the Unification of Germany

Fall or Spring (3) Prerequisite: A GER 300-level class or permission of instructor
This class investigates the former German Democratic Republic and the unification of the two Germanies as they are represented in official government publications as well as in literature and film. Readings include texts by Christa Wolf, Stefan Heym and films such as 'Run, Lola Run' and 'Good-Bye, Lenin.'

424. The Holocaust in German Literature and Film

Fall or Spring (3) Prerequisite: A GER 300-level class or permission of instructor
Philosophical, literary, and artistic responses to and representations of the Holocaust. Authors to be discussed include Thomas Mann, Karl Jaspers, Alexander and Margarethe Mitscherlich, Hannah Arendt, Paul Celan, Peter Weiss, Ruth Klueger, Juergen Habermas, Theodor Adorno, Jean Amery, Primo Levi. The Holocaust in film, the plastic and visual arts, music, monuments, memorials, and in places of remembrance. Theoretical issues raised by the Historikerstreit and by the more recent debate concerning the Air War.

495-496. Honors.

Fall and Spring (3, 3) Prerequisite or corequisite: two other 400-level German courses.