CJ Walsh

M.A. Candidate

Email : [[e|cjwals]]
Current Research : The material displays and ritual use of home furnishings of three artisan families in Williamsburg between 1725 and 1763.

Bio

Raised in historic Chester County, Pennsylvania, CJ completed his Bachelors of Arts in Atlantic history from Duke University in 2002.  His time in North Carolina also reinforced his interests in both barbecue and business. Following a three year stint with the Comcast Corporation, CJ returned to the ivory tower for the polishing of his demonstrative skills. His tenure in major market television advertising fused his passion for business with his ardor for history.

His research interests lie in consumerism in the eighteenth century British Atlantic world. Forging archival research generated through the York County Records Project and artifacts fresh from Williamsburg's infamous sandy loam, his thesis examines the material displays and ritual use of home furnishings of three artisan families in Williamsburg between 1725 and 1763.  Using this combination of knowledge sources, he argues that inventories and trash pits can show us how families presented themselves to their own and to others through social rituals.

CJ often admits that he never excelled at archeology, and his skill set often finds itself better for hosting tea parties than excavating tea cups.  As proof, CJ toiled under the Virginia sun during the summer of 2005 in search of Robertson's infamous Windmill.  Katie and Andy tolerated his subpar trowelling as he often regailed CW visitors with stories of days past and archeological trivia.  His archaeological career reached its peak when he found a Garcia y Vega cigar tube from 1973. This experience garnered him a new appreciation for plowzone and the power of John Deere earthmoving equipment.

Now back in the private sector, CJ operates three consumer shows for DMG World Media, the world's largest exhibition company and a subsidiary of the Daily Mail Group, a struggling British publishing conglomerate. His master's thesis often functions as a release from the inanity of the workplace.