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Kristina  Poznan

ABD History

Email : [[e|kepoznan]]
Website:  : http://kepoznan.blogs.wm.edu/
Current Research : Identity formation and ethnic politics among Austro-Hungarian immigrants in the United States

Bio

Kristina Poznan received her B.A. in 2008 from Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY, and is currently in her fifth year of the M.A./Ph.D. program in History at William & Mary. Her dissertation explores the relationship between transatlantic migration and the dissolution of Austria-Hungary. It traces the actions of Austro-Hungarian state and church officials to maintain the loyalty of subjects abroad, the judgments of Americans as to which peoples they considered nations, and the processes among migrants of crafting new European identities in the United States. The project has been supported by  a Fulbright Austrian-Hungarian Joint Research Award, the George E. Pozzetta Dissertation Award from the Immigration and Ethnic History Society, and an East European Studies Title VIII Short-Term Scholarship from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Kristina also assists with publications at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture and with research for Bedford/St. Martin's America's History textbook. She has taught HIST 216 (From the American Revolution to the Civil War) and HIST 215 (From Jamestown to the American Revolution) for the National Institute of American History & Democracy’s Pre-Collegiate Summer Program, and will be offering HIST 122 (American History since 1877) in the Department in Spring 2014. 

Awards, Fellowships and Publications
  • Short-Term Doctoral Fellowship at the German Historical Institute, 2014
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute for College & University Teachers at Columbia University, 2014
  • Balch Fellowship at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 2014
  • Awarded a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship, March 2014

  • won a $1,000 award for Excellence in Scholarship for the paper she submitted to the 13th Annual Graduate Research Symposium, March 2014
  • Samuel Flagg Bemis Dissertation Research Grant from the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), November 2013
  • East European Studies Title VIII Short-Term Scholarship, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, September 2013
  • George E. Pozzetta Dissertation Prize, Immigration and Ethnic History Society, 2013
  • Reves Center for International Studies Student Research Grant, Roy R. Charles Center at the College of William & Mary, Summer 2013
  • Fulbright Austrian-Hungarian Joint Research Grant, U.S. Department of State, Spring 2013
  • Provost’s Summer Research Grant, College of William & Mary, Summer 2012, 2013
  • Goodwin Fellowship, Lyon G. Tyler Department of History, College of William & Mary, 2010-present
  • Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Hungary, U.S. Department of State, 2009-2010
  • Christopher Wren Summer Fellow, Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture, Summer 2009
  • Lyon G. Tyler Graduate Fellowship, Lyon G. Tyler Department of History, College of William & Mary, 2008 – 2009