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James Hill

PhD Student

Email: jlhill@email.wm.edu

Bio

James Hill received his B.A. in history and his M.A. in American history from the University of North Florida in 2008 and 2010, respectively. He has presented at Florida Historical Society's annual meeting in 2009 regarding the activity of Creek Indians seeking trade partners in British Florida and Spanish Cuba in the mid-eighteenth century. His current research stems from this topic, analyzing Creek methods of social and political organization during the late eighteenth century. His research interests include American Indian history, Atlantic World history, as well as social, political, and economic history during the colonial and Early Republican eras.

Awards, Fellowships and Publications
  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California for the 2014-2015 academic year
  • fellowship at the John Carter Brown Library
  • awarded a research fellowship at the David Library of the American Revolution
  • article, "'Bring them what they lack': Spanish-Creek Exchange and Alliance Making in a Maritime Borderland, 1763-1783," just published in Early American Studies.
  • his paper "'My Warriors are Victorious over the American in every quarter': The Spanish-Creek Alliance and its Efforts to Combat the New Republic, 1784-1789," won the Award for Excellence in Scholarship from William & Mary’s Graduate Research Symposium
  • had an article accepted for publication in Early American Studies. The article, titled “‘Bring them what they lack’: Spanish-Creek Exchange and Alliance Making in a Maritime Borderland, 1763-1784,” will appear in the journal’s Winter 2014 issue.
  • two-month fellowship at the John Carter Brown Library, 2014

  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California for the 2014-2015 academic year
  • "'Bring them what they lack': Spanish-Creek Exchange and Alliance Making in a Maritime Borderland, 1763-1783," just published in Early American Studies
  • McNeil Center for Early American Studies Fellowship, 2014