College Courses & Workshops

The topics and times of workshops and seminars vary each semester. See the Dynamic Schedule for a list of current courses. The Graduate Center's short courses typically meet for 1.5 to 2 hours of instruction each week in the late afternoon or early evening to avoid scheduling conflicts with students' traditional disciplinary courses. These College courses are open to all William and Mary graduate students. These courses are zero credit, and are offered at no cost to the student or home department in Graduate Arts and Sciences. The Graduate Center's College courses are listed below.

Course Descriptions
COLL 501. English Conversation & Pronunciation.

Fall, Spring (0 credit, P/F)

In this course students who are non-native English speakers will learn more about the rhythm, stress, and intonation patterns of spoken English, improve their ability to communicate with others, and practice distinguishing sounds that are unique to the English language. Recorded assignments and in-class discussions will allow students opportunities to practice their conversational skills and learn more about American culture.

COLL 503. Listening, Speaking & Pronunciation Skills.

Spring (0 credit, P/F)

Listening and speaking are inextricably linked.  Active listening is a key component to correcting pronunciation errors, and is essential for academic, professional, and personal success.  This course is designed for nonnative English speakers who wish to develop their English proficiency.  A variety of resources including film, CDs, and the Internet, expose students to different American accents and speech patterns.  Recorded assignments provide opportunities for self-assessment and instructor feedback.

COLL 505. Oral Presentation Skills.

Fall, Spring (0 credit, P/F)

This course is for domestic and international students who want to refine their oral communication skills and learn more about presentation norms.  Students will participate in various kinds of oral communication activities, including presenting speeches given for different purposes, critiquing speech content, organization, and delivery, and presenting a paper following specific guidelines set forth by a conference or association.

COLL 508. Professional Communication: Preparing for the Job Market.

Fall (0 credit, P/F)

This course provides preparation for post-student professional life, with a focus on the corporate environment.  Students will identify the characteristics of their ideal job and will assess strategies to obtain such a position.  Students will gain experience with composing written introductions to a prospective employer via CVs, resumés, and cover letters.  Students will practice the skills needed for job interviews.  Appropriate on-the-job interactions and common business etiquette norms will be discussed.

COLL 520. Academic Writing.

Spring (0 credit, P/F)

A course for domestic and international students to improve writing skills and gain confidence in their ability to write formal, academic English. The  writing process will be emphasized, with special attention given to improving the students’ organizing, proofreading and revising skills. Students will learn how to identify their audience, define their purpose, and add cohesion and clarity to their writing. In addition, writing conventions concerning plagiarism and other writing norms will be examined. 

COLL 525. Writing for Publication.

Fall (0 credit, P/F)

 A course for domestic and international students who have mastered the basics of academic writing, and are preparing articles for publication in the sciences and humanities. Students will examine articles from their field to learn more about field-specific styles. In addition, they will review and revise their own writing, and participate in peer reviews. Participants in this course should currently be involved in doing research.

COLL 530. Thesis/Dissertation Writing.

Fall and Spring (0 credit, P/F)

This is a course for domestic and international students who are actively writing their theses/dissertations, including students who are writing articles for publication as components of their theses/dissertations. In collaboration with their academic advisor and in consultation with the instructor, students will organize and write individual chapters, simultaneously reviewing and revising their writing. Mini-workshops throughout the 10-week class will address topics that are relevant to the thesis/dissertation writer, such as organization, effective research strategies and citations, advisor/advisee interaction, and time management. Instructor permission required.

COLL 550. College Teaching.

Spring (0 credit, P/F) Macdonald, Zuber.

Discussion and exploration of college teaching including general issues in college teaching; various teaching strategies including lectures, discussions, group work, writing assignments; course design, syllabus and test construction, and grading; integrating research and education; and job search and application strategies. Students will develop a portfolio to include sample assignments and a general teaching statement. Readings on teaching and learning and on university education. Instructor permission required.

COLL 601. Intensive English Conversation and Pronunciation.

Summer (0 credit, P/F)

In this course students who are non-native English speakers will learn more about the rhythm, stress, and intonation patterns of spoken English, improve their ability to communicate with others, and practice distinguishing sounds that are unique to the English language. Recorded transcripts and in-class discussions will allow students opportunities to practice their conversational skills and learn more about American culture. In addition, specialized vocabulary and readings will address different fields of study, and student presentations will focus on field-related topics.

COLL 620. Intensive Academic Writing.

Summer (0 credit, P/F)

In this course domestic and international students will improve their writing skills and gain confidence in their ability to write formal, academic English. The  writing process will be emphasized, with special attention given to improving the students’ organizing, proofreading and revising skills. Students will learn how to identify their audience, define their purpose, and add cohesion and clarity to their writing. Writing conventions concerning plagiarism and other writing norms will be examined. Writing assignments will be tailored to the students’ specific fields of study.