William & Mary

Courses in Latin American Studies

LAS Fall 2016 Schedule of Courses

Please note that any courses not cited as cross-listed with LAS are already in our catalogue and will already count for LAS credit. If you have any questions, please feel free to make an appointment to talk with Betsy Konefal [[bokone]] about your schedule.

Latin Ameican Studies Courses for Fall 2016

LAS 132-01 (13638), Modern Latin American History, Konefal, T/Th 11-12:20, Blair 223

LAS 290-01 (14246), Politics of Food, Buck, MW 2-3:20, Wash 308

LAS 290-02 (14247), Intro to Hispanic Studies, Tandeciarz, T/Th 2-3:20, Morton 20

LAS 290-03 (14248), Intro to Hispanic Studies, Terukina, T/Th 2-3:20, Morton 20/1

LAS 350-01 (12393), Latin American Cultures, Society, Politics, T/Th 12-30-1:50, Blair 201

LAS 390-01 (13470), Terror, Rights, Memory in Latin Amer, Konefal, T/Th 2-3:20, Blair 205

Course description: This course examines state terror and its repercussions in Latin America since the mid-20th century, focusing on three case studies: Chile, Argentina, and Guatemala. Through these cases we will engage critically and in-depth with major questions surrounding violence and human rights: What explains the continent-wide wave of repression in Latin America in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s? When and why did governments choose to use extreme force against their own citizens? To what extent was the US government aware of or implicated in the violence?  What is the relationship between race or ethnicity and political violence? How does gender shape repression and human rights struggles? And crucial for our time, what have societies done in the wake of extreme state violence? How do people “remember” periods of intense violence? How can they (and we) best uncover and grapple with “truth”?

LAS 390-xx (coming), Topics in Latin Amer Cultural Studies, tbd

LAS 390-03 (14251), Art of the Andes, Webster, MW 2-3:20, Andrews 201

LAS 390-04 (14252), Politics of Developing Countries, Mullen, MW 2-3:20, Tyler 123

LAS 390-05(14253), Politics of Developing Countries, Mullen, MW 3:30-4:50, Tyler 123

LAS 390-02 (13643), International Political Economy, van der Veen, T/Th 9:30-10:50, Tyler 123

LAS 390-06 (15420) International Political Economy, van der Veen, T/Th 11-12:20, Tyler 123

LAS 390-07 (15421) International Political Economy, Maliniak, T/Th 2-3:20, Morton 202

LAS 390-08 (15422) International Political Economy, Maliniak, T/Th 3:30-4:50, Morton 202

LAS 390-09 (tbd), Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean, Blouet, MWF 11-11:50, Wash 302

LAS 400-01 (14254), Immersion Experience, Konefal, instructor permission required

LAS 450-01 (14255), Senior Seminar: Value, Money & Empire, Terukina; T/Th 11-12:20, Wash 312

Course Description: an interdisciplinary course that seeks to understand “economic thought” as it circulated in the Hispanic Atlantic during the early modern period (16th and 17th centuries), and the social tensions that trade raised both in Spain and in the New World. This course seeks to examine the discrepancies between “economic” theory (Aristotle) and practice as they are represented in texts as diverse as novellas, poems, theatrical pieces, medical treatises, etc., that circulated across the Spanish empire (Spain, Mexico, Peru). This course will be guided by questions such as the following: how are money and trade represented in early modern Hispanic texts? What kind of social impact do transatlantic trade, Spanish-American abundant natural riches, and the accumulation of capital have in the seigniorial Hispanic society? How are concepts such as “demand” and “supply” used to justify the Spanish empire? While we will read Aristotle in English translation, primary sources and class discussion will be in Spanish. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

LAS 450-02 (14556), Senior Seminar: Hispanic Cinema, Buck, T/Th 2-3:20, Tyler 123

LAS 450-03 (14574), Senior Seminar: Blatinx: Black Identity in Lat Am - 12111 - AMST 470 - 01

Course Description -- Blatinx: Black Identities in Latin America This course investigates racial identity formations of African-descended peoples throughout Latin America and the Hispanophone Caribbean. Since 1502 when the first African slaves arrived in Hispaniola until the present, the economic labor, cultural expressions, and sociopolitical movements of afrodescendientes has contributed to the development and peopling of the region. By way of class discussions, videos, music, and other media, students will locate this African presence and examine the complex ways of understanding difference and distinction worked out historically by Afro-Latin Americans. Students will also develop an appreciation for how class, gender, and sexuality entangle with race to create senses of personal and collective selfhood for Blatinx peoples.

For senior seminars, see also ECON 484, below.

Other courses that count for LAS but are not cross-listed:

ECON 475-01, International Trade Theory, T/Th 9:30-10:50, Blow 334

ECON 475-02, International Trade Theory, Feldman, MWF 10-10:50, Blow 334

ECON 475-03, International Trade Theory, Feldman, MWF 1-1:50, Tyler 134

ECON 483, Development Economics, Seyoum, T/Th 3:30-4:50, Tyler 123

ECON 484 , Senior Seminar: Economics of Growth, Albegaz, MWF 11-11:50, Tyler 133

GOVT 150-03, Politics and Policy of Int’l Devt, Tierney, MW 2-3:20, Tyler 113 (COLL 150; 1st yrs only)

HIST 100-02, Atlantic Empires and Globalization, MW 2-3:20, Blair 205 (COLL 100; 1st yrs only)

HIST 150-03, Pirates of the Atlantic World, Prado, MW 3:30-4:50 (COLL 150; 1st yrs. only)

Cross-listed Courses by Department:

American Studies

AMST 470 – 01, Senior Seminar, Blatinx: Black Ident in Lat Am, crn 12111, MW 2-3:20, College Apts 9

Blatinx: Black Identities in Latin America This course investigates racial identity formations of African-descended peoples throughout Latin America and the Hispanophone Caribbean. Since 1502 when the first African slaves arrived in Hispaniola until the present, the economic labor, cultural expressions, and sociopolitical movements of afrodescendientes has contributed to the development and peopling of the region. By way of class discussions, videos, music, and other media, students will locate this African presence and examine the complex ways of understanding difference and distinction worked out historically by Afro-Latin Americans. Students will also develop an appreciation for how class, gender, and sexuality entangle with race to create senses of personal and collective selfhood for Blatinx peoples.

Art History

ARTH 396-01, Art of the Andes (Webster; XL: LAS 390-03/14251) MW 2-3:20, Andrews 201

ARTH xxx, Cross-Cultural Encounters and Arts Across Spanish Frontier in North Amer, Luis Gordo Peláez, tbd

This course would explore the visual and material culture along the Northern frontier of Spain´s empire in the Americas and its legacy in present-day United States. Through lectures, readings, and discussions, I would examine the art and architecture of Spanish Florida, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, California, and Louisiana from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth-century. Students would be introduced to a variety of subjects including the early exploration and visualization of Spanish North America, the encounter with the Native American cultures, the military and religious conquest, the evangelization and foundation of missions and settlements in Florida and New Mexico, the religious imagery of New Mexican santeros or saint-makers, the Jesuit arts and missions in the Baroque era, the indigenous presence, the defense of the frontier and the architecture of fortifications and presidios, the circulation of prints, books, and other material culture along the frontier, the arts and architecture in the Age of Independence and Enlightenment, and the legacy of Spanish and Hispanic Visual Arts in the United States.

Economics

ECON 475-01, International Trade Theory, T/Th 9:30-10:50, Blow 334

ECON 475-02, International Trade Theory, Feldman, MWF 10-10:50, Blow 334

ECON 475-03, International Trade Theory, Feldman, MWF 1-1:50, Tyler 134

ECON 483, Development Economics, Seyoum, T/Th 3:30-4:50, Tyler 123

ECON 484 , Senior Seminar: Economics of Growth, Albegaz, MWF 11-11:50, Tyler 133

Government

GOVT 150, Politics and Policy of International Development (first years only; Tierney)

GOVT 150-03, Politics and Policy of Int’l Devt, Tierney, MW 2-3:20, Tyler 113 (COLL 150; 1st yrs only)

GOVT 312-01, Politics of Developing Countries, Mullen, MW 2-3:20, Tyler 123

GOVT 312-02, Politics of Developing Countries, Mullen, MW 3:30-4:50, Tyler 123

GOVT 328-01, International Political Economy, van der Veen, T/Th 9:30-10:50, Tyler 123

GOVT 328-02, International Political Economy, van der Veen, T/Th 11-12:20, Tyler 123

GOVT 328-03, International Political Economy, Maliniak, T/Th 2-3:20, Morton 202

GOVT 328-04, International Political Economy, Maliniak, T/Th 3:30-4:50, Morton 202

GOVT 384-01, Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean, Blouet, MWF 11-11:50, Wash 302

Hispanic Studies

HISP 281, Intro to Hispanic Studies (Tandeciarz and Terukina; XL LAS 290-02/14247 and 290-03/14248) TH 2-3:20, Morton 20 and 1.

HISP 290, Politics of Food (Buck; XL LAS 290-01/14246) MW 2-3:20, Washington 308

HISP 3xx, Topics in Latin American Cultural Studies (new NTE; XL LAS 390-02)

HISP 417, Senior Seminar: Hispanic Cinema (Buck; XL LAS 450-02/14556) TH 2-3:20, Tyler123

HISP 489, Senior Seminar: Value, Money & Empire (Terukina; XL LAS 450-01/14255) TH 11-12:20, Washington 312

Course Description: an interdisciplinary course that seeks to understand “economic thought” as it circulated in the Hispanic Atlantic during the early modern period (16th and 17th centuries), and the social tensions that trade raised both in Spain and in the New World. This course seeks to examine the discrepancies between “economic” theory (Aristotle) and practice as they are represented in texts as diverse as novellas, poems, theatrical pieces, medical treatises, etc., that circulated across the Spanish empire (Spain, Mexico, Peru). This course will be guided by questions such as the following: how are money and trade represented in early modern Hispanic texts? What kind of social impact do transatlantic trade, Spanish-American abundant natural riches, and the accumulation of capital have in the seigniorial Hispanic society? How are concepts such as “demand” and “supply” used to justify the Spanish empire? While we will read Aristotle in English translation, primary sources and class discussion will be in Spanish. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

History

HIST 100, Atlantic Empires and Globalization (1st yrs only; Prado, crn 14184) MW 2-3:20, Blair 205

HIST 150, Pirates of the Atlantic World (1st yrs only; Prado, crn 14280) MW 3:30-4:50,

HIST 132, Modern Latin America (Konefal; XL LAS 132/13638) TH 11-12:20, Blair 223

HIST 311, Terror, Rights, Memory in Latin America (Konefal; XL LAS 390-01/13470) TH 2-3:20, Blair 205

Course description: This course examines state terror and its repercussions in Latin America since the mid-20th century, focusing on three case studies: Chile, Argentina, and Guatemala. Through these cases we will engage critically and in-depth with major questions surrounding violence and human rights: What explains the continent-wide wave of repression in Latin America in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s? When and why did governments choose to use extreme force against their own citizens? To what extent was the US government aware of or implicated in the violence?  What is the relationship between race or ethnicity and political violence? How does gender shape repression and human rights struggles? And crucial for our time, what have societies done in the wake of extreme state violence? How do people “remember” periods of intense violence? How can they (and we) best uncover and grapple with “truth”?

 *** For registration: please check the college schedules against these courses because room designations and times may be subject to change.