Economics Courses and Current Syllabi

Note: An example of a course syllabus can be viewed in .pdf format by clicking on the course number.

Please see the on-line schedule for the most current information about courses offered.

Description of Courses:

 101. Principles of Microeconomics

(GER 3) Fall and Spring (3 credits)

The study of economic behavior at the level of individual households and firms. Topics include scarcity and choice, supply and demand, production, cost and market organization.

102. Principles in Macroeconomics

(GER 3) Fall and Spring (3 credits)

The study of aggregate economic activity. Topics include national income and output, unemployment, money and inflation, and international trade

150W. FR SEM: Economics of Bad Behavior

Spring (4 credits)

This seminar focuses on specific topics in economics and will vary from semester to semester, with this semester’s topic being the economics of bad behavior. This course is a substitute for ECON 101. Students my not receive credit for ECON 101 and ECON 151.

300. Labor Markets and Entrepreneurship

Spring (3 credits)

Classes focusing on specific topics in economic theory or policy. The topics differ across sections and vary from semester to semester, with this semester's topic being labor markets and entrepreneurship.

303. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151

The theory of price and resource allocation in a market economy.

304. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 102/152

Theories of aggregate economic behavior.

307. Principles and Methods of Statistics

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

A study of the principles and uses of descriptive statistics, probability distributions, sampling distributions, statistical inference, hypothesis testing and regression analysis.

308. Econometrics

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 102/152, ECON 307

A survey of the econometric methods that are commonly used in economic research with emphasis on the application of these techniques rather than their theoretical development. No calculus or linear algebra is required.

311. Money and Banking

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

An analysis of the monetary system with emphasis upon financial institutions, determination of the money supply and the relationship between money and economic activity

315. Financial Economics

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

A survey of the theory and principles of the financial system and of financial economics

321. Economics of the Public Sector

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

Theory and principles of public economics with emphasis on state and federal expenditure programs and taxes. Topics include education, welfare, Social Security, unemployment insurance, an the impact of taxes on labors supply, savings, and wealth.

322. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151

The application of efficiency and equity criteria to environmental issues. Topics include policies for environmental protection, renewable resources, exhaustible resources and unique natural environments.

341. American Economic History

(GER 4A) Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

A study of the major trends and developments in the American economy from colonial times through New Deal. Topics include trade, transportation, business, banking, labor, and policy.

342. Global Economic History

(GER 4A) Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

An introduction to the global economic history of the world from ancient times to the mid-2th century, with emphasis on a European development, growth, world-wide economic interactions perspective.

362. Government Regulation of Business

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

An analysis of the principles and purposes of government regulation of business. Topics include energy policy, consumer and worker protection, transportation, telecommunications and public utilities.

400. Research Methods in Economics

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303 and/or ECON 304

Seminar classes, normally 10-15 junior or senior economics majors focusing on specific topics in economic theory or policy. Topics vary by section and seminar, with this semester’s topic being research methods in economics.

400. Topics in Antitrust

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303 and/or ECON 304

Seminar classes, normally 10-15 junior or senior economics majors focusing on specific topics in economic theory or policy. Topics vary by section and seminar, with this semester’s topic being topics in antitrust.

400. International Economic Governance

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303 and/or ECON 304

Seminar classes, normally 10-15 junior or senior economics majors focusing on specific topics in economic theory or policy. Topics vary by section and seminar, with this semester’s topic being international economic governance.

403. Advanced Microeconomic Theory: Incentives

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303, MATH 111 or ECON 331

An investigation of contracts and other devices that harness self-interest. The aim is to determine the conditions under which the mechanisms generate socially optimal outcomes. Situations in which the pursuit of self-interest is self-defeating, yielding outcomes that are far from socially optimal, are also treated. Calculus is used to identify and evaluate outcomes.

408. Time-Series Econometrics

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 308, ECON 331 or MATH 211

This course is an introduction to the econometric analysis of time series data. Topics include ARIMA models, forecasting, analysis of nonstationary series, unit root tests, co-integration and principles of modeling.

410. Game Theory

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 303

Game Theory is a set of mathematical models used to study how individuals make decisions when their actions affect each other. The emphasis of the course material is a mix of formal theory and applications, including bargaining, information and auctions. While economists turn to game theory to model many situations, the field is firmly rooted in mathematics. Thus, you will struggle in this course if you are not very comfortable with college-level algebra and basic calculus. In addition to mathematical modeling, this course will make extensive use of economics experiments to identify situations where game theory predicts actual behavior and to learn more about why game theory fails to predict behavior in some settings.

451. Labor Market Analysis

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303

A theoretical and empirical analysis of labor demand and supply behavior. Topics include labor force participation, labor mobility and wage differentials, the economics of labor unions, and analyses of minimum wage, occupational safety and health, and unemployment insurance.

456. Economics of Health Care

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303

This course applies economic analysis to the study of health and health care. Topics include the determinants of health status, features of the market for medical care, insurance and health care delivery, and the role of government in the health care sector.

475. International Trade Theory and Policy

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303

This course examines the gains from trade, trading patterns between countries, the effect of trade on income distribution and the effects of industrial and commercial policies. Other topics include the political economy of trade protection an the development of the world trading system.

476. International Finance and Open Economy Macroeconomics

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 304

This course is a theoretical and empirical examination of international financial markets and national income determination in an open economy. Topics include exchange rate systems, the balance of payments and macroeconomic policymaking among interdependent economies.

483. Development Economics

Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152, ECON 303 and ECON 304

A survey of theories that seek to explain the process of economic development and the contrasts in economic performance among low-income countries. Emphasis on the link between the economy and institutions, both market an non-market. Topics include sources and sectorial distribution of growth, evolution of markets, trade, finance, income distribution, and development policy/strategy.