Economics Courses and Current Syllabi

 

Note: An example of a course syllabus can be viewed in .pdf format by clicking on the course number.

Description of Courses

101. Principles of Microeconomics

(GER 3) Fall and Spring (3 credits)

The study of economic behavior at the level of individual households and firms.  Topics include scarcity and choice, supply and demand, production, cost and market organization.

102. Principles in Macroeconomics

(GER 3) Fall and Spring (3 credits)

The study of aggregate economic activity.  Topics include national income and output, unemployment, money and inflation, and international trade

150W. FR SEM: Sports and Economics

Fall (4 credits)

This seminar focuses on specific topics in economics and will vary from semester to semester.   This semester, the topic is Sports and Economics.  This course is a substitute for ECON 101. Students my not receive credit for ECON 101 and ECON 151.

150W. FR SEM: Industrial Revolution

Fall (4 credits)

This seminar focuses on specific topics in economics and will vary from semester to semester. This semester, the topic is the Industrial Revolution.This course is a substitute for ECON 101. Students my not receive credit for ECON 101 and ECON 151.

303. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151

The theory of price and resource allocation in a market economy.

304. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 102/152

Theories of aggregate economic behavior.

307. Principles and Methods of Statistics

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

A study of the principles and uses of descriptive statistics, probability distributions, sampling distributions, statistical inference, hypothesis testing and regression analysis.

308. Econometrics

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 102/152, ECON 307

A survey of the econometric methods that are commonly used in economic research with emphasis on the application of these techniques rather than their theoretical development. No calculus or linear algebra is required.

315. Financial Economics

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

A survey of the theory and principles of the financial system and of financial economics

322. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151

The application of efficiency and equity criteria to environmental issues.  Topics include policies for environmental protection, renewable resources, exhaustible resources and unique natural environments.

331. Introduction to Mathematical Economics

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

A survey of mathematical techniques used in economics including topics in linear algebra, calculus and optimization techniques.  Emphasis will be on the economic applications of these methods.

341. American Economic History

(GER 4A) Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

A study of the major trends and developments in the American economy from colonial times through New Deal.  Topics include trade, transportation, business, banking, labor, and policy.

362. Government Regulation of Business

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152

An analysis of the principles and purposes of government regulation of business.  Topics include energy policy, consumer and worker protection, transportation, telecommunications and public utilities.

380. Experimental Economics

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151

Experimental economics is a field in which decision making is examined in a controlled laboratory environment.  The resulting data are used to evaluate theories and policies that are not easily tested with naturally occurring data.  This course surveys experimental research in many fields including decision and game theory, environmental economics, industrial organization, and public economics, and provides a basic framework for designing and conducting experiments.

400. African Economic Development

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303 and/or ECON 304

Seminar classes, normally 10-15 junior or senior economics majors, focusing on specific topics in economic theory or policy.  Topics vary by section and semeser, with this semester's topic being economic development.

407. Cross Section Econometrics

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 308

Economic data often comes as a cross-section of data points, frequently collected as part of a sample survey.  The nature of these data calls for the use of a specialized set o tools, which will be developed in the course.  Among the models to be examined are discrete, censored and truncated dependent variables, sample selectivity and duration models.  Hands-on analysis of data sets will feature prominently.

410. Game Theory

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 303

Game Theory is a set of mathematical models used to study how individuals make decisions when their actions affect each other.  The emphasis of the course material is a mix of formal theory and applications, including bargaining, information and auctions.  While economists turn to game theory to model many situations, the field is firmly rooted in mathematics.  Thus, you will struggle in this course if you are not very comfortable with college-level algebra and basic calculus.  In addition to mathematical modeling, this course will make extensive use of economics experiments to identify situations where game theory predicts actual behavior and to learn more about why game theory fails to predict behavior in some settings.

415. Applied Financial Derivatives

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303 and ECON 307

The economic theory of stochastic calculus and the solutions of the resulting partial differential equations are developed in the context of equity derivatives.  Corollary risk-management characteristics are considered.  Context is provided as each student manages a paper portfolio of electronic derivatives. 

420. Economics of Information

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303

How markets and governments create incentives to elicit private information from individuals and firms, and how individual welfare is affected as a result.  Topics include: Auctions, bank failures, internet commerce, education, mandatory retirement, voting and preference revelation, allocating dormitory rooms.

446. History of Economic Thought

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303 and ECON 304

The development of economic analysis with emphasis upon classical and neo-classical economics.

460. Economic Analysis of Law

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303

Economic analysis is employed to explain the existence of prevailing legal rules in standard areas of legal study such as property, contracts, torts, family law, civil procedure and criminal procedure

475. International Trade Theory and Policy

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 303

This course examines the gains from trade, trading patterns between countries, the effect of trade on income distribution and the effects of industrial and commercial policies.  Other topics include the political economy of trade protection an the development of the world trading system.

476. International Finance and Open Economy Macroeconomics

Fall and Spring (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 304

This course is a theoretical and empirical examination of international financial markets and national income determination in an open economy.  Topics include exchange rate systems, the balance of payments and macroeconomic policymaking among interdependent economies.

483. Development Economics

Fall (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECON 101/151, ECON 102/152, ECON 303 and ECON 304

A survey of theories that seek to explain the process of economic development and the contrasts in economic performance among low-income countries.  Emphasis on the link between the economy and institutions, both market an non-market.  Topics include sources and sectorial distribution of growth, evolution of markets, trade, finance, income distribution, and development policy/strategy.