2012 Archive

Scientist researches parasite that he removed from his own body

Jon Allen had been experiencing "intermittent rough areas" that he could feel with his tongue. Allen, whose specialty is invertebrate biology, suspected that he might have been harboring an unwanted invertebrate guest.

Emergency siren makes it a bad day for turtle trapping

A wetland ecosystems class caught turtles on Sept. 4 as part of part of a larger initiative. The Ecological Research as Education Network includes turtle censuses from 25 other schools in the United States.

10 EVMS/W&M collaborative research projects funded

Ten research projects involving faculty at William & Mary and Eastern Virginia Medical School will each receive $10,000 in funding as part of a program to foster collaboration between researchers at the two institutions.

Fair game? CCB will examine hunting pressure on shorebirds

The 2011 loss of two whimbrels included in the Center for Conservation Biology’s tracking project to hunters near Port-Louis, Guadeloupe, was a watershed event for shorebird scientists, forcing them to consider the real possibility that hunting within the West Indies and the northern coast of South America may be playing a significant role in observed population declines.

Freshman phage lab evolves into study of proteomics

What could possibly be a follow-up to a group of freshmen discovering a new form of life and finding new genes in its genome? Having that same group continue their research in a new investigation of bacteriophage proteomics.

Invertebrate love

Spring is in full bloom in William & Mary’s biology labs, with more than 350 undergraduate students spawning marine invertebrates.

The politics of fishing in East Africa

As a child, Sarah Glaser dreamed of working in Africa. In studying the fishing of Lake Victoria, Glaser made her dream come true.

Diane Shakes
Professor Shakes receives Plumeri Award

Diane Shakes was one of 20 William and Mary faculty to receive the Plumeri award for Faculty Excellence in recognition of their exemplary achievements in regard to teaching, research and service.

OspreyWatch begins second season

For the second year, the Center for Conservation Biology is sounding the call to OspreyWatchers throughout the world to record and share their observations with a growing online community of global citizens that are linked by an interest in osprey biology and a concern for aquatic environments.

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2013 Creative Adaptation awards announced

Four entries chosen that improve the quality of education at the university while reducing costs or generating revenue that can be reinvested.

Brian Rabe '13 to be awarded Thomas Jefferson Prize

Brian Rabe '13 is the 2013 winner of the Thomas Jefferson Prize in Natural Philosophy. Rabe, a double major in biology and chemistry, has set his sights on being a researcher and professor at a university.

Greg Capelli
Dr. Gregory M. Capelli (1948-2012)

Dr. Greg Capelli, 64, of Lanexa, Virginia died on Wednesday, December 12, 2012 in Williamsburg, Virginia. Dr. Capelli recently retired as Professor Emeritus of Aquatic Biology at the College of William & Mary after 38 years of service.

George Gilchrist
George Gilchrist named as AAAS 2012 Fellow

George Gilchrist, Biology Department Emeritus Professor, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Homecoming 2012
Homecoming Reception - 2012

Despite the threat of Hurricane Sandy, alumni reunited for 2012 Homecoming Weekend.

Advisor of the Year 2013

Dr. Paul Heideman, Professor of Biology, is the 2013 Outstanding Faculty Advisor of the year.

CCB tracks another surprising whimbrel migration

Catching whimbrels on their breeding grounds in the Arctic Circle is quite different from trapping those same birds in their mid-migration staging areas on Virginia's Eastern Shore.

Putting the trees onto the map

A student and professor have been collaborating on a survey of the most important trees on the verdant campus of William & Mary.

Dan Cristol
Professor Cristol pens op-ed for New York Times

Dan Cristol wrote an article the New York Times headlined “Why Bambi Must Go”, published in the Op-Ed section on 18 May, 2012. The article reflects Cristol’s passion for bird conservation, and highlights the effects that burgeoning deer populations have on decimating plant communities that support bird populations.

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In search of Lady's Slippers

Biology professor Martha Case has spent her career researching this delicate, quirky orchid.

Noyce Scholar Robin Shaulis ’11  (front) demonstrates seine-hauling technique to students at a GEAR-UP academy at VIMS.
Noyce Scholars

America needs more good, seasoned K-12 STEM teachers—a set of professionals who not only understand science and math, but who also know how to make other people understand science and math.

STEM Outreach: Summer updates

Every summer since 1999, a number of high school biology teachers gather in the labs and classrooms of William & Mary’s Integrated Science Center to work with and discuss the latest advances in research with the College's biologists.

Recipients of Plumeri Awards for Faculty Excellence announced

First awarded in 2009, Plumeri Awards for Faculty Excellence have touched faculty and students in almost every corner of the campus, and now the College is announcing the 2012 honorees.