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Elizabeth Neidenbach

Ph.D.

Email : [[e|ecneid]]

Background
Elizabeth C. Neidenbach is a PhD candidate in the American Studies program. Her dissertation, "The Life and Legacy of Marie Couvent: Saint-Domingue Free Women of Color Refugees and the Making of a Francophone Free Black Community in New Orleans" recovers the life of an African woman who was enslaved as a child in colonial Saint-Domingue and died a free and wealthy slave owner in antebellum New Orleans. Using Couvent as a focal point, she examines how thousands of free women of color from Saint-Domingue utilized social networks and property ownership to not only rebuild their lives in New Orleans but actively contribute to the development of a French-speaking free people of color community between 1791 and 1840.
Areas of Specialization
African Diaspora; Atlantic World in the Age of Revolutions; Nineteenth Century African American history and material culture; New Orleans history and culture; Free women of color
Education

B.A., Tulane University, American Studies and African and African Diaspora Studies, 2003. Graduated magna cum laude

M.A., College of William and Mary, American Studies, 2005.

Courses Taught

American Studies 470/Africana Studies 306:  "Haiti and the US: Impact, Interaction, Influence," Fall 2011.

Interdisciplinary Studies 480: "Social Movement Theory in Action," Independent Study, Fall 2009.

American Studies 470: "Social Movements of the Past, Civic Engagement for Today: Explorations of American Methods of Citizenship," Fall 2008.

American Studies 470: "Why New Orleans Matters: Cultural, Social,and Ecological Investigations into the History of the Crescent City," Spring 2007.

American Studies 201: "American Popular Culture," Teaching Assistant, Fall 2005.

Publications and Presentations

" 'Mes dernières volontés': Testaments to the Life of Marie Couvent, a Former Slave in New Orleans." Transatlantica (in review).

"From Africa to Jamaica: The Making of an Atlantic Slave Society, 1775-1807 by Audra A. Diptee (Review)," Southern Historian (Spring 2012, Volume 33).

"Marie Couvent" and "Creole Women of Color" in KnowLA: Digital Encyclopedia of Louisiana History, Culture, and Community (Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, 2011).

" 'Refugee from St Domingue living in this city': The Geography of Social Networks in    Testaments of Refugee Free Women of Color in New Orleans." American Historical Association Annual Conference. New Orleans, LA, 2013.

 " 'Anciennes Habitantes de Saint-Domingue': Migration and Social Networks in Testaments of Refugee Free Women of Color in New Orleans." Southern Historical Association Annual Conference. Mobile, AL, 2012. 

 " 'Refugee from St Domingue living in this city': The Geography of Social Networks in Testaments of Refugee Free Women of Color in New Orleans." Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality Conference. University of Chicago/College of the Holy Cross, Chicago, IL, 2012.

 " 'Inhabitant of Saint-Domingue, today refugee in this place': Atlantic Networks and the Contours of Migration among Free Women of Color during the Haitian Revolution." Carolina Lowcountry in the Atlantic World Program Conference. College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, 2012.   

 " 'Mes dernières volontés': Testaments to the Life of Marie Couvent, an Ex-Slave in New Orleans." Graduate Research Symposium. College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 2011.

"From Madame to Madam: A Preliminary Investigation into the Life and Legacy of Marie Couvent." Full participant at the Schlesinger Library Summer Seminar on Gender History. Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 2007.

"The Power of a Legend: Negotiations and Representations of Marie Laveau in Ishmael Reed's The Last Days of Louisiana Red and Jewell Parker Rhodes' Voodoo Dreams." The Fifth Annual Graduate Research Symposium and American Cultures Conference. College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 2006.

"The Woman, the Legend, the Power: Representations of Marie Laveau in Novels by Robert Tallant, Jewell Parker Rhodes, and Barbara Hambly." The Biannual Meeting of the Southern American Studies Association. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 2005.

"Light-Skinned Prostitutes, Black Madams, and White Men, Oh My!: Carl Galmon and His Problem with Black Female Prostitution in Antebellum New  Orleans." The Third Annual American Culture Conference. College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 2004.